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Parks Resource GuideCollege Station Since 1938 pARks RECREATION Collt-qc STATiON City of College Station Parks and ecreation Department College Station, Texas COLLEGE STATION PARK SYSTEM RESOURCE GUIDE City of College Station, Texas Parks and Recreation Department 1938 - 1994 PARKS �t RECREAT 1 ON CollEgE STATION TABLE OF CONTENTS Department History 1 Facts & Figures 4 Budget Summary 5 Budget Breakdown 6 Organizational Chart 7 Value Statement 8 Goals 9 Map of Parks 10 Parks Inventory 11 PARKS •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Anderson 12 Bee Creek 14 Brison 16 Brothers Pond 18 Central 20 Conference Center 22 Cy Miller 24 Emerald Forest 26 Fairview 28 Gabbard 30 Georgie K. Fitch 32 Hensel 34 Jack & Dorothy Miller 36 Lemontree 38 Lick Creek 40 Lincoln Center 42 Lions 44 Longmire 46 Merry Oaks 48 Oaks 50 Parkway 52 Raintree 54 Richard Carter 56 Sandstone 58 Southwood Athletic Complex 60 Thomas 62 Wayne Smith 64 Windwood 66 Wolf Pen Creek 68 Woodcreek 70 PAVILIONS ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Pavilion Rules & Guidelines 75 Bee Creek 76 Central 78 Oaks 80 Southwood 82 Thomas 84 COLLEGE STATION PARKS 8c RECREATION HISTORICAL BACKGROUND The City of College Station was incorpo- rated in 1938. The first city council made provi- sions for the creation of the city Parks Board in May, 1939. The Parks Board had authority to manage parks and public grounds for recreational and beautification purposes. Although there was no official city park, the board had the authority to receive grants of money and donations of labor and materials. Other than creating a Parks Board, the council gave little attention to the development of parks or a recreational program during the first decade of the city's existence. In 1947, the Council established the first city park with purchases of land from F.B. Clark and Hershel Burgess. The prop- erty, which surrounded and included the drained College Lake Park, became known as Dexter Park and was renamed Brison Park in 1980 in honor of Fred Brison. In 1953, a large group of citizens, utilizing their newly -attained charter privileges, suggested a possible referendum which, if passed, would establish a Recreation Board. The Board would operate with a budget funded by an increase in taxes. Rather than submit the proposal to a vote, Mayor Langford, with the approval of the Council, appointed a five man Recreation Board. A recre- ation fund account was created which would re- ceive appropriations each year. The Board's duties included administering the parks and developing a recreational program with major emphasis on youth activities. Within a short period of time, the board sponsored programs in swimming, tennis, golf, Little League baseball, and arranged city pic- nics. However, most programs were possible only because Texas A&M officials allowed the city to use the college's recreational facilities. City officials also looked into the possibil- ity of converting the partially damaged Lincoln School into a recreational center. In January, 1966, the Lincoln School caught fire and with 600 - 700 spectators hindering fire fighting efforts, firemen and volunteers could not prevent severe damage. Ten classrooms were lost, along with the library, principal's office, and all school records. The school district agreed, in 1968, to lease Lincoln School to the City of College Station for recreational purposes. The city also obtained use of the property adjacent to the school for an all purpose sports field. The project was not immedi- ately successful. Youngsters vandalized the facili- ties, and only after Mayor Anderson pleaded with the community for support, did destruction di- minish. By 1973, however, Lincoln Center offered a full time recreational program for all College Station residents with such activities as basketball, softball, ping-pong, arts and crafts, and judo. In 1977, the center became city property. During Anderson's administration, offi- cials realized that as the city expanded so must the recreation facilities. Parks and Recreation became a city department in 1971, although the parks super- intendent and his assistant were employed on a part-time basis. The rest of the recreation staff worked without compensation. The new depart- ment also continued to rely heavily on university facilities. In order to insure future recreational areas, the council included mandatory park land dedications in the Subdivision Ordinance. Accord- ing to the ordinance, developers were required to donate a portion of their land for park sites. Acreage was based on the number of units they constructed, or they could give the city the cash equivalent. This principle of mandatory park land dedication was later challenged through the court system and was successfully upheld by a Texas Supreme Court decision in 1985. The Council made substantial progress during the early 1970's in establishing a long awaited municipal park which would have facilities for swimming. College Station officials learned, that beginning in the summer of 1973, its residents could no longer use the Texas A&M pool. It became imperative that the city develop the pro- 1 posed park. In 1973, William Fitch donated six- teen additional acres to the selected park site, and the Federal Bureau of Outdoor Recreation ap- proved a matching grant of $132, 500 for develop- ment of a pool. The city hired J.W. Wood as architect -engineer for the project. Although the budget would not allow all requested amenities to be constructed, residents soon enjoyed the avail- ability of an Olympic -size swimming pool in their community. College Station's first aquatic facility opened in Bee Creek Park on October 5,1974. It was later namedAdamson Municipal Pool in honor ofArtAdamson, long time swimming instructor at Texas A&M University. Since the early 1950's, residents had ex- pressed an interest in a city-wide recreational pro- gram and in acquiring municipal park sites. City leaders have made significant progress towards that goal. The expansion in city parks and recreation facilities during the late 70's and early 80's was phenomenal. Not only did the amount of park acreage double, but officials also sought to accom- modate a variety of activities. The development of the Parks and Recreation Department reflected this growth. The city staff, Parks and Recreation Board and City Council worked together to implement these projects. With additional funds allocated from the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation in 1974, the city added tennis courts, ballfields, and playgrounds at Bee Creek Park. In September, 1975, the Brazos County Bicentennial Committee inquired about the possibility of establishing an official county arboretum at Bee Creek Park in conjunction with the national celebration. The Council enthusiasti- cally supported the idea and designated seventeen undeveloped acres for this purpose. Citizens from both the city and county planted and labeled various species of trees and mapped out a nature trail. The arboretum, later renamed for former Mayor Andy Anderson, was ready in time for the 1976 Fourth of July festivities. Throughout the late 19'10's, the City Coun- cil continued to add land and facilities to the park system. In 1975, the City Council amended the park land dedication ordinance to require develop- ers to donate more acreage for recreation areas than was originally specified by the ordinance. The following year the city established the College Station Parks and Recreation Foundation, a trust fund created expressly for the purpose of purchas- ing Lincoln Center from the school district. Using federal money received in December, 1977, the Parks Department developed facilities at Thomas and Oaks Parks on the east side of the city. A second municipal pool opened in Thomas Park on June 21,1980. One of the Parks and Recreation Department's most successful achievements was the development of College Station Central Park. In June of 1978, the city purchased forty-seven acres near the East Bypass and Krenek Tap Road to provide athletic fields for the community's orga- nized softball and soccer teams. The site also con- tained a large wooded expanse and a small pond. The natural setting convinced park officials to expand the facility to a multi -purpose recreational area. Tennis courts, picnic areas, playground facili- ties, nature trails, and a group pavilion were in- cluded in the plans. College Station residents cel- ebrated the completion of their largest municipal park in August of 1982. The Parks and Recreation Department not only decided to use Central Park as a model for the future, but also chose to establish their office building and maintenance facility amid the scenic setting. In 1984, the Parks and Recreation Depart- ment created "Christmas In The Park". Substantial donations from local businessman Jack Lester en- abled the city to purchase lights and other decora- tions for the park. Every year volunteers and city employees install lights throughout Central Park, creating a brilliant show for all to see. 600 cars per hour view the decorations at peak times and this attraction will continue to be enjoyed by many for years to come. In response to the community's needs, the city purchased and developed Southwood Athletic Park. By the end of 1984, one and a half years after construction first started, Southwood became Col- 2 lege Station's second largest developed park, con- sisting of forty-four acres. The park has many facilities including a pool, baseball and soccer fields, a tennis center and basketball courts. There is also a maintenance facility and a large group pavilion located in the park. Funding for this project was made available through the 1981 bond issue along with a matching grant from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. In 1985, the city obtained its first historical park. Richard Carter Park is the site of the Richard Carter Homestead. The park is on the corner of Brazoswood Drive and the East Bypass. Carter was College Station's earliest settler, arriving fromAla- bama in 1831. He received a land grant from the Mexican government of 4,428 acres. Carter was appointed to the first Board of Commissioners after Brazos Countywas created in 1841 and helped survey the site of Booneville, the first county seat. He was also one of the area's wealthiest land own- ers, raising cattle, corn, and cotton during the years before the Civil War. In honor of Richard Carter, Carter Park has a self guided interpretive center with displays about the history of this early settler and a stylized sculpture depicting Carter staking the homestead. In March 1987, the City Council studied the expenditure of Parkland Dedication Funds in the park zone which contains a section of Wolf Pen Creek. This area is approximately a one and a half mile section of the creek between the Highway 6 Bypass and Texas Avenue. During discussion of expenditures and improvements, it was suggested the opportunities of the flood plain should be examined for recreational use. Comparison was made to a similar project in Navasota where consid- erable public support and assistance was given to the project by adjacent property owners and the general citizenry. From this and other discussions, evolved the City Council's request of staff to develop a conceptual plan. Through collaboration between the Parks, Engineering and Planning Departments, a conceptual approach for development of Wolf Pen Creek was prepared and submitted to the Council. The Council requested that work be continued. The consulting firm of J.T. Dunkin and Associates was hired to work on the creation of a Master Plan for the Wolf Pen Creek Corridor. Within two years, the City Council had placed the development of Wolf Pen Creek Corridor as its first priority for 1989-90. The first phase of this;devel- opment was begun with the construction funded by various sources, including a grant from theAstin Trust and a grant from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. In November of 1991, construction of the amphitheater and surrounding park land, involved in Phase I, was started. Construction was complete in June of 1993. The park contains such amenities as an amphitheater with a 2,000 square foot stage, a lake, a playground, restrooms, and a picnic pavilion. This 2 million dollar project will set the pace for future phases to come, as well as provide a staging area for existing and future recre- ation programs and special events.. Other long range projects include the imple- mentation of the Lincoln Center/Wayne Smith Park Master Plan and the development of Lick Creek Park. The Lincoln Center/Wayne Smith Park Master Plan includes the acquisition of addi- tional property to create a greenbelt corridor that will provide additional recreational facilities. Lick Creek Park will be a 515 acre natural park set aside for hiking, camping, nature study, and as perma- nent habitat for endangered species of our area. 3 CITY OF COLLEGE STATION INTERESTING FACTS & FIGURES 1993 - 1994 POPULATION ESTIMATES: City of College Station 52,456 (Incorporated 1939) City of Bryan 55,002 (Incorporated 1871) Brazos County 121,862 (Established 1841) { 1990 Census Figures } *PROPERTY TAX RATES: College Station Bryan City .445 .6092 School District 1.63 1.485 Brazos County .4342 .4342 Total 2.5092 2.5284 { * Per $100 Valuation} SALES TAX RATES: City of College Station City of Bryan Brazos County State of Texas CITY OF COLLEGE STATION Total City Budget ($209,995 per day) $76,648,279 General Fund Budget $20, 710, 697 Parks & Recreation Budget ($9025 per day) $3,294,133 Total Permanent Employees (City) 608.5 Total Permanent Employees (PARD) 55 Developed Park Acres 354.17 AC Undeveloped Park Acres 559.00 AC Total Park Acres 913.17 AC Total Area Incorporated 28.1 Sq. miles Total Miles of Paved Streets 201 miles Maximum Water Production (4 wells) 15.6M Gal/Day Maximum Electric Capacity 170 Megawatts College Station Parks and Recreation services cost $.17 per person per day 4 PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT FY 1993-94 BUDGET SUMMARY Division Salaries Supplies Maintenance Service Utilities Sundry Capital Total 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 Administration $262,629 $ 7,350 $ 2,950 $ 0 $ 3,310 $34,616 $ 2,900 $313,755 Recreation 413,438 86,798 3,950 94,004 99,937 55,254 5,000 759,981 Special Facilities 483,059 58,981 44,653 10,685 125,170 56,826 18,135 813,709 Parks Operations 592,732 37,860 89,927 2,325 94,210 35,115 0 852,169 Forestry 306,010 19,200 76,260 41,500 35,559 23,790 46,200 544,519 Totals $2,057,868 $210,189 $217,740 $148,514 $358,186 $205,601 $72,763 $3,294,133 PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT REVENUES/EXPENDITURES COMPARISON FY1978-93 Fiscal Year Expenditures ( Total Less Capital ) Revenues (Total) Revenues / Expenditures FY78-79 $366,660 $47,718 FY79-80 426,377 71,184 FY80-81 640,479 95,298 FY81-82 733,073 140,120 FY82-83 1,024,694 192,245 FY83-84 1,238,709 . 254,412 FY84-85 1,405,236 266,100 FY85-861 1,574,678 300,552 FY86-87 1,586,457 290,068 FY87-882 2,395,419 453,907 FY88-893 2,032,305 378,585 FY89-90 2,191,970 417,436 FY90-91 2,267,853 404,363 FY91-92 2,554,325 414,750 FY92-934 2,921,269 633,795 FY93-945 3,294,133 535,900 i Community Center & Teen Center added to PARD 215 Month Fiscal Year 3 Cemetery added to PARD 4 Wolf Pen Creek Amphitheater and Adamson Lagoon implemented s Approved Budget Source: Comprehensive Annual Financial Reports, FY1992-93,er FY1993-94 Annual Budget 13% 17% 15% 19% 19% 21% 18% 19% 18% 19% 19% 19% 18% 16% 22% 16% 5 1992-1993 P.A.R.D. Budget by Division Recreation 23.77% Special Facilities 24.59% Parks Operations 27.46% Administration 10.56% Forestry 13.61% 1993-1994 P.A.R.D. Budget by Division Special Facilities 24.78% Parks Operations 25.95% /-- Recreation 23.14% Administration 9.55% Forestry 16.58% COLLEGE STATION PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT DIRECTOR ASSISTANT DIRECTOR DIV. 80 Administration'. FORESTRY SUPERINTENDENT SENIOR PLANNER STAFF ASSISTANT SENIOR SECRETARY/ RECEPTIONIST PLANNER DRAFTSMAN (PT) DN.81 Recreation!. RECREATION SUPERINTENDENT SENIOR SECRETARY/ RECEPTIONIST PROGRAMS SUPERVISOR ASSISTANT PROGRAMS SUPERVISOR FORESTRY SUPERVISOR 1 DIV. 82'. Special Facilities DN. 83 Parks Operations FACILITIES SUPERINTENDENT ATHLETICS CONCESSIONS INSTRUCTION SUPERVISOR SUPERVISOR SUPERVISOR ASSISTANT ATHLETIC SUPERVISOR CEMETERY SEXTON IRRIGATION SPECIALIST HORTICULTURE / FORESTRY WORKER HORTICULTURE / FORESTRY CREWLEADER AS OF MARCH 1994 POSITION NUMBER FULL TIME 53 PART TIME 2 SEASONAL N/A TOTAL 55 HORTICULTURE / FORESTRY WORKER CONFERENCE/ TEEN CENTER SUPERVISOR SENIOR SECRETARY/ RECEPTIONIST POOLS SUPERVISOR FACILITY MAINTENANCE/ SETUP COORDINATOR CEMETERY GROUNDS WORKER CEMETERY GROUNDS WORKER PARKS SUPERINTENDENT LINCOLN CENTER SUPERVISOR BUILDING ATTENDANT SECRETARY/ RECEPTIONIST RECREATION ASSISTANT (PT) EAST DISTRICT SUPERVISOR PARKS CREW LEADER EQUIPMENT OPERATOR GROUNDS WORKER I PARKS CREW LEADER EQUIPMENT OPERATOR GROUNDS WORKER I 1 SOUTH DISTRICT SUPERVISOR PARKS CREW LEADER EQUIPMENT OPERATOR GROUNDS WORKER I PARKS CREW LEADER EQUIPMENT OPERATOR GROUNDS WORKER I WEST DISTRICT SUPERVISOR PARKS CREW LEADER EQUIPMENT OPERATOR GROUNDS WORKER I PARKS CREW LEADER EQUIPMENT OPERATOR GROUNDS WORKER I "WE PROVIDE GOOD THINGS IN LIFE!" * We are absolutely dependable. * We are innovative. * Be confident in our abilities and tho our fellow employees. Be willing to accept the risk of failure. WE ARE PROFESSIONAL Be responsible for our actions. Fully utilize training opportunities to improve our knowledge and abilities. Always present a positive image and attitude. Be safety conscious and technically proficient. Always be courteous in our daily contacts. 8 1994 GOALS DEPARTMENTAL GOALS ''c Develop Parks and Recreation Masterplan Develop Infrastructure Replacement Plan `r Develop Future Capital improvement Program 'r Park Development and Improvement * ; Continue to Prornote Tourism `r Continue to Improve Emergency Preparedness DEVELOP PARKS AND RECREATION MASTERPLAN • Continue to seek input and conduct public hearings • Complete draft masterplan for review and input • Consideration and approval of masterplan by Parks and Recreation Board • Consideration and approval of masterplan by City Council DEVELOP INFRASTRUCTURE REPLACEMENT PLAN 'r Establish a staff committee to determine scope of plan 'fir Develop a comprehensive inventory of existing facilities and methodology for updating i Develop criteria for replacement standards and schedule A Establish criteria to enhance the longevity of new facilities DEVELOP FUTURE CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 'Or Conduct a comprehensive needs assesment A Determine priorities for development ' Determine the cost of development and operation of proposed facilities * Assist with the marketing and promotion of bond elections PARKDEVELOPMENTAND IMPROVEMENT ✓ Design and construct improvements for Oaks Park At Design and construct improvements for Thomas Park ' Design and construct improvements for Central Park ✓ Plan and design the development of Sandstone Park 'r Construct Wolf Pen Creek Improvements * Design additional restrooms for Wolf Pen Creek ''r Design and construct improvements for Lincoln Center, Wayne Smith Park, and Lions Park CONTINUE TO PROMOTE TOURISM ✓ Continue to bid and conduct regional, state, and national tournaments ✓ Conduct '94 Games of Texas ✓ Determine tourism impact from George Bush Library and other planned facilities it Continue to host events and seek partnerships with other groups and agencies at the local, state, and national level ' Develop a long range plan to promote and enhance tourism CONTINUE TO IMPROVE EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS At Assist Brazos County with the completion of all annexes related to the Emergency Management Plan 'e Review and update the College Station Emergency Standard Operating Procedures ✓ Continue to promote city staff training programs, exercises, and professional development • Conduct a comprehensive analysis of emergency preparedness for the City of College Station 9 GREENS PRAIRIE 23 sL z Z 1. Anderson 0 2. Bee Creek k 3. Brison 4. Brothers Pond 5. Central * P.A.R,D, Office 6. Conference Center 7. Cy Miller 8. Edelweiss 9. Emerald Forest 10. Fairview 11. Gabbard 12. Georgie K. Fitch 13. Hensel 14. Jack & Dorothy Miller 15. Lemontree 16. Lick Creek 17. Lincoln Center 18. Lions 19. Longmire 20. Merry Oaks 21. Oaks 22. Parkway 23. Raintree 24. Richard Carter 25. Sandstone 26. Southwood Athletic ComplE 27. Thomas 28. Wayne Smith 29. Windwood 30. Wolf Pen Creek 31. Woodcreek RENTALS Picnic pavilions and softball fields may be rented at the Parks and Recreation Department. All reservations are made at the Parks and Recreation Office and payment and deposit must be made at the time of reservation. FRIDAY SATURDAY- MONDAY- RATE SUNDAY THURSDAY MAXIMUM PER RATE PER RATE PER PAVILION CAPACITY DAY DAY DAY DEPOSIT Central Park Southwood Bee Creek Oaks Thomas Central Softball 200 300 100 50 30 $75.00 $75.00 $30.00 $30.00 $15.00 $125.00 $125.00 $ 30.00 $ 30.00 $ 15.00 $50.00 $50.00 $30.00 $30.00 $15.00 $100.00 $100.00 0 $ 50.00 0 $150.00 $7.00/hr. $100.00 * The softball fields at Central Park may be rented March - November for softball tournaments on Friday, Saturday and Sundays only. The Parks and Recreation Department reserves all concessions rights. ** Multiple day usage discounts are available *** Hensel Park rentals are handled by Texas A&M PARK RULES • Advertising in City parks is prohibitted. • Park curfew for neighborhood parks is 11:00 pm - 5:00 am. • Park curfew for community parks is 1:00 am - 5:00 am. • Dogs must be on leashes at all times. • All wildlife in City parks is protected. • It is unlawful to litter in City parks. • It is unlawful to cut or destroy vegetation. • All vehicles must park in designated areas. • It is unlawful to swim in park ponds. • All firearms and airguns are prohibited. • All vendors must have an approved permit. College Station �co <Zr vco JQ GpJQ6`0 �.9 40 0 od' Q ° Parks System 40 , 40 1AN ,.0� ." v° , ,' �v u0J Qvv �Q C? Inventory yQ el-Q��', Qs`' Qz.= Qs si<' e° 4r ij..4<i2 c0 '<14 09 4t. � ova c f Q4' . ,,,., •<K:�\\ ?Z„ A 1 E � � @. p ��&i�.rc.>':�..a �&:'u�� �,Y:: BEE CREEK xM� \\ * S. �i ��S \ �. \ �3,.... • • h�' '• , • t.2 �Y C<>, \ .rY,�., .: . lN��i„ k Zi + \. ,: e�t>.. ;4 -A.�2 <'h�`�<�o Jo �uC1>i�Ys\, • ''' � ��: • Ci\..'3 237 43 E • 76 teen center . CONFERENCE CENTER 7.8 CYMILLER t` � `� » `' i 2 O 2.5i k� 4 „, :i �^ t�. 2Qli 11..: , EASTGATE 1 • :....,y �. �.�..2,>'"F<'a:^,cZ:z ci< fi� '' U`u�A�tt i2^Zc'`yZ 4r>'Q� .?� i�l'< !'..ps?r:�`x �' • �>xx����,,,. '��Yc>"2,`'R<� ;.iks :Y' c.G • t:�;gt.nde ,��:. 'andev of d EMERALD FOREST 10.7 FIRIMIN a ° , ' `5'o .i E; "' • , undeveloped R ..a _ R EIMI LINCOLN CENTER • 8 • • • 10 ` t oted.�. tJONS 34,� i 4 2 r Ali • • •4 A� LONGMIRE �O' bx,< #�i < S" MERRY OAKS �3,<� ss :,>4.:x� �; C��( :)5 , a'b3 ; 3 ! \`><o�l3So;,>��$c 1 . ::�. undeveloped OAKS 7.5 • 0 • PARKSITE te7 � � 0• • i<al, 401001403 .r PARKWAY 19 AINTRE x ;;. ? ,< n� W.d tt RICHARD CARTER 7.4 • :..:XeC��Y:��,\�3iZ{,yn�: <,^>:t:.iti:;'.r. sSAND�S)1+IF�� �3 � s � � �Z�\i�x.Yl :',i: , , akuvica a�� SOUTHW00D 44 7 • • • • 0 0 0 0 • 0 27 :: Sa., ���� i b 5j v :, 161.5 Z • � .� :L is:.; Z„ti oZ> ,.. >.J-> -.xO 1'1.J "5 ..3-. 3,. Rc, ) c. ia.Z ti: WAYNE SMITH 2 • 0 • o WIIDWOOn4W, , 1 <,,,. • • 0 • • • 0 z z 0 .lndeveloped WOODCREEK 66 0ODWAY fi zz; � s 3 �� � S �ti � � 3 �� rss z \�� a WOLF PEN CREEK 19.47 0 0 • o • • • 36 amphitheater M i ' \ <TOTAL_ACHES; 9132T ft a , , : LL . 11 o Lighted Facilities • Unlighted Facilities * Neighborhood Park ANDERSON PARK LOCATION: 900 Anderson Zone 6 SIZE: 8.94 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1979 PURCHASE PRICE: $165,774.42 PARK DESCRIPTION: Anderson Park was designed primarily to alleviate overcrowding on the few soccer fields which existed at the time. The park contains five youth soccer fields of various sizes along with two basket- ball courts, a playground, a shelter with restrooms and storage, and a parking area for 30 cars. Funding for development was through the 1981 bond issue. Anderson Park is dedicated to Rev. Norman Andcrson who was Minister of College Station A&M Presbyterian Church from 1928- 1963. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION . DATE: COST: 1. Full Park Development 1983 $ 234,185.44 2. Additional Irrigation 1987 $ 3,645.00 3. 2 Water Fountains 1987 $ 1,096.00 4. Concrete Sidewalk 1992 $ 14,300.00 TOTAL $ 253,226.44 12 ANDERSON HOLL EMAN SOCCER FIELD NO 2 PICNIC TABLES SOCCER FIELD NO 1 V w w J • ler) ,iii:z lip•mi .. 0 Iti . y1 Y ' d • PLAYGROUND z H O LL J w 0 N SOCCER FIELD NO 3 SOCCER FIELD V 0 BASKETBALL 8 SOCCER FIELD NO 5 ANDERSON PARK, NOT TO SCALE BEE CREEK PARK LOCATION: 1900 Anderson Zone 6 SIZE: 43.5 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Community Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1946 PURCHASE PRICE: Parkland Dedication PARK DESCRIPTION: Bee Creek Park is the site of College Station's first swimming pool. Art Adamson Pool is a 50 meter pool with a separate wading pool that is named in honor of the former A&M swimming coach. The park also contains four lighted tennis courts, two lighted softball fields, a pavilion, sand volleyball court, playground, and a concessions building. There is on -site parking for 237 cars. The Andy Anderson Arboretum is also located here on 17 wooded acres bounded by the cemetery, Bee Creek, and Hwy 6. The Arboretum contains a shelter and an interpretive trail system and is named in honor of D A Q nderson n former Mayor Collo e Station. Partial funding for this park by -- • --•-----+�-����, .� .�.....-. +.. �.,.�... of vvaa..g,. ��avaa. i as aaaa auaauaia� was provided the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Project No. 48-00230 in the amount of $207,850. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION DATE: COST: 1. Pool, Tennis Courts, Playground, and Ballfields 1976 $ 422,060.63 2. Parking Lot Expansion 1979 $ 88,803.50 3. Concessions Bldg., Misc. Park and Arboretum Improvements 1983 $ 61,645.00 4. Additional Playground 1986 $ 26,000.00 5. Swing Set Pits and Volleyball Court 1991 $ 7,000.00 6. Shade Structures around Pool 1991 $ 23,500.00 7. Mural, Fence Expansion, Frog Slide and other Pool Amenities 1992 $ 52,379.00 8. Large Slide, Stump Slide, 2 Shade Covers,Walks, Bridge, and Tree Plantings 1993 $ 152,433.33 TOTAL $ 836,821.46 14 TEXAS AVE AMNd 1S3M4H1fOS BEE CREEK CONCESSIONS BRISON PARK LOCATION: 400 Dexter Zone 6 SIZE: 9.2 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACOU 1947 PURCHASE PRICE: Donation PARK DESCRIPTION: Brison Park, formerly known as Dexter Park, was renamed in 1980 in honor of Fred Brison. The park is a beautifully wooded green space protected from development by deed restrictions. A sea- sonal stream runs the length of the park. Fred Brison was on the College Station City Council and Mayor Protein from 1971 - 1974 and a member of the Texas A&M University Horticultural Fac- ulty for 43 years. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: 1. Parking Area Construction 2. Drainage Improvements 1982 $ 8,143.00 3. Signage and Landscaping 1983 $ 25,750.00 4. Jogging Trail & Bridge 1986 $ 3,500.00 S. Replacement of Jogging Trail with Concrete c: d ___ 1992 $ 13,050.00 and Additional Concrete Walks CONTRACT DESCRIPTION D� COST: 1993 $ 25,024.00 TOTAL $ 75,467.00 16 BROTHERS POND PARK LOCATION: 3100 Rio Grande Zone 5 SIZE: 16.12 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1977, 1978 PURCHASE PRICE: Parkland Dedication 7.57 Acres Purchased 8.55 Acres @ $132,834.90 PARK DESCRIPTION: Brothers Pond Park was named for the 1 acre pond located near the center of the park that was the playground of the Fitch brothers as they were growing up. The site varies in topography from a flat open area to a rolling wooded area traversed by an intermittent stream. Development: of the.site,. included pond and drainage improvements, nature trails, picnic units, basketball court, playground, seating area, practice fields and a 1/2 mile jogging trail with exercise stations. Development funding was through the 1981 bond issue. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION DATE: 1. Full Park Development under the Neighborhood Parks Improvements Fund 1983 COST: $ 83,950.00 TOTAL $ 83,950.00 18 AC, . . ' 0 0 \ ‘ \ < , ....., ...-• . \ co ‘ \ ,..., .4. \ \ 0.... 0...••••• • ' \ \ ‘ ..... ....... 0.... • ' .; \ ek*. ..... • ... ••••.' ••••••••• ‘ . 0... .e. 0,... 9) ,OZ7.;r• ,,,, .... , \ \ ‘ / .„„...\ \ \ \ .. ..... , \ , \ " •••• .' .:;,(• ,...„ s \ —1 Z ‘Z ‘Ek \ tiNi (52 X \ V < • N. --I .04.. 41 ' f . .. C3 ' 0 0.. cal Cc Efi 43, 1— O. cc; CENTRAL PARK LOCATION: 1000 Krenek Tap Road Zone 3 SIZE: 47.22 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Community Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1978 PURCHASE PRICE: $ 353,536.14 PARK DESCRIPTION: Developed in 1979 as College Station's largest park, Central was unique in that it offered the widest variety of recreational opportunities of any park in the city at the time.The natural setting was origi- nally the Arnold family farm. It includes a two acre pond and ten acres of dense woods. A second pond was developed in 1983. Other facilities on the site include four lighted softball fields, three adult soccer fields, two lighted tennis courts, a sand volleyball court, basketball court, a fishing pier, nature trails, and parking for 297 cars. The Parks and Recreation Department office is also located here along with the maintenance chop for tiie Eacr Maintenance Distrirct oral Forestry Division Partial funding ---- -------------------_ _.._�........✓.s....v......... a v. rob. Y l/l . Partial blCll 11.L114111 for this park was provided by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Project No. 48-00-701 in the amount of $ 265,056.00 and Project No. 48-00701 in the amount of $31,082. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION DATE: COST: 1. Overall Development, includes: Irrigation, Fencing, Waterline, Architectural/Concessions Building, Paving, Concessions Building, Sewer Line, Tennis Courts, Architectural/Office, Pavilion, Lighting, Playground, Fishing Pier, Signage, Trails, Paving, Office Building, Architectural/Maintenance Building, Maintenance Building 1979-83 $ 927,940.49 2. Signage & Landscaping 1986 $ 2,600.00 3. Basketball Court, Sidewalks, and Ballfield Fences 1991 / 92 $ 73,900.00 4. Maintenance Building Expansion 1992 $ 68,120.00 5. Office Building Expansion and Tree Plantings 1993 $ 81,098.33 TOTAL $1,172,158.82 20 0 �. ac w 0 z Z w -'00 SOFTBALL PARKING z 0 H I— I— iii CC CY D 0 8 H 0 ZH 6 1-- a0 m B PLAYGROUND NATURE TRAIL OC a CC 1- z w U ti cc W. QO� 2m Y O Q N cc C WWI a co Et a. t CONFERENCE CENTER LOCATION: 1300 George Bush Dr. Zone 6 SIZE: 2.3 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Conference Center DATE ACQUIRED 1980 PURCHASE PRICE: Land trade with College Station Independent School District FACILITY DESCRIPTION: Originally built in 1949 as a high school, the renovated Conference Center opened to the public in June 1982. The center is available for rental to any individual or group, with accommodations fo 10 - 400 people in various rooms. Rates and fees vary according to the type of group utilizingthen facility. The center is ideal for receptions, dances, parties, and exhibits, as well as non-commercial, commercial, or political meetings. The Conference Center is funded by the College Station hotel/ motel tax which collects tax on rooms rented in local establishments in College Station, Shenanigans Teen Center, located behind thc Conference .. Conference Center, was opened in 1985 to provide an after school recreational facilty for students. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: 1. Complete Renovation, including: Land, Building, Furnishings, and Landscaping 1981 $1,000,000.00 3. Interior Renovation Work 2. Complete Renovation of Shenanigans Teen Center (approx.) 1984 $ 85,000.00 4. Interior Renovation Work i 1992 $ 31,149.00 12 1993 $ 12,199.00 CONTRACT DESCRIPTION DATE. COST: TOTAL $1,128,348.00 22 OAKWOOD MIDDLE SCHOOL NOT TO SCALE } • a) W 0 Zp� W W cr1_ WZ W W 0 0 1S NI1OH CY MILLER PARK LOCATION: 2615 Texas Ave. Zone 3 SIZE: 2.5 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1976 PURCHASE PRICE: Land trade with Clarence Miller PARK DESCRIPTION: The Chamber of Commerce occupied the site in 1976 and the pond was used as a picnic area and a gathering spot for people to see the ducks and go fishing. When the Chamber of Commerce moved in 1984, the City of College Station used the property for the developmentofa newpolice'station^ which in the process had to fill in over half of the pond for a new parking lot. In 1987, the remain- ing pond was renovated and a jogging trail, pavilion, aerator, and two piers were added to give this park a pleasant and enjoyable atmosphere to play and relax in. Cy Miller Park was dedicated on Apri116,1988 to Clarence Ivan Miller, who used to own this site. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION 1. Full Park Development DATE: COST: 1987 $ 71,860.00 $ 71,860.00 24 • J (ID g 1 O PARKING LOT 2 3f1N3AV SVX31 EMERALD FOREST PARK LOCATION: 8400 Appomattox Zone 4 SIZE: 4.59 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1986 PURCHASE PRICE: Parkland Dedication PARK DESCRIPTION: Emerald Forest is one of the most beautiful native plant sites in the City of College Station Park System Inventory. The 4-1/2 acre site is heavily wooded and bordered on the north side by Bee Creek. The park has a playground, half basketball court, picnic tables, drinking .fountain,.walking, trail, and some arca lighting. The design of the park was guided by the intent of preserving the native vegetation with minimal disturbance to the site. The varied recreational opportunities arc many in this unique park. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION 1. Full Park Development DATE: COST: 1989 $ 78,380.00 TOTAL $ 78,380.00 26 FAIRVIEW PARK LOCATION: 501 Park Place Zone 6 SIZE: 1.8 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1954 PURCHASE PRICE: Donation PARK DESCRIPTION: Fairview Park encompasses a small city block and consists of an open playing field with a practice ballfield. Small Oak trees line a portion of the park perimeter.This park will become a link in the development of the Lincoln Center/Wayne Smith Park Corridor. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION 1. Construction of three concrete slabs DATE: COST: 1988 $ 1191.00 TOTAL $ 1191.00 28 cc u_ NOT TO SCALE CC —J 0 2 GABBARD PARK LOCATION: 1201 Dexter Dr. S. Zone 6 SIZE: 10.67 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1978 PURCHASE PRICE: $ 187,802.67 PARK DESCRIPTION: As a neighborhood park, Gabbard Park has proven to be one of the most popular parks in town. Purchased as a result of interest of neighborhood residents, Gabbard Park received substantial public input during the planning stages. Prior to construction, a Texas A&Mprofessor-was consulted to: determine recommendations for renovation of the pond. Recreational features include a playground, fishing piers, seating areas, kiosk, and practice fields. Development funding was through the 1981 bond issue. The park is named in honor of Letcher P. Gabbard for his service to the community. Mr. Gabb rd was head of 1 Iep rtfYlent l�f Agric„itural Economics and Rural Sociology y at Texas �» ...+� ..v»u �. the a... .+t+ua.....�...., v. a aba vua..ua ua •...�.v aav aaaaW VVl.1l/1VijJ 1 �.AQs A&M from 1922-1940. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION DATE: COST: 1. Full Park Development under the Neighborhood Parks Improvement Fund 1983 $ 58,650.00 2. Tree Planting 1987 $ 4,840.00 3. Jogging Track & Plaque Pedestal 1992 $ 26,050.00 TOTAL $ 89,540.00 30 cc a. m m GEORGIE K. FITCH PARK LOCATION: 1100 Balcones Zone 5 SIZE: 11.3 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1977 PURCHASE PRICE: Donation PARK DESCRIPTION: This park's recreational features include a basketball court, practice fields with backstops, picnic units, shelter, playground, open play areas and nature trails. Fitch Park is dedicated to Georgie K. Fitch in honor of her total dedication to her family as a wife and mother. This park is=dedicated to a -; mother as an eternal gesture of the public appreciation due to all those who quietly mold the rest of.. us and securely hold our worlds together. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION 1. Full Park Development under the Neighborhood Parks Improvement Fund 2. Lighting DATE: COST: 1983 1992 $ 45,700.00 $ 9,000.00 TOTAL $ 54,700.00 32 NOT TO SCALE Sloe iit.1 CC0,0 Z HENSEL PARK LOCATION: South College Zone 1 SIZE: 29.7 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Community Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1958 PURCHASE PRICE: Does not apply PARK DESCRIPTION: Hensel Park is a part of the Texas A&M University system designed primarily for the students of the university. In 1986, the City of College Station installed a playground and a fitness center. The park includes 3 pavilions, picnic units, playground, jogging trails, volleyball,court .fitness, court softball- - Field, parking, and an open play area. The City of College Station provides limited development funds through the Parkland Dedication Ordinance through an agreement with Texas A&M Univer- sity. The pavilions for this park can be rented through Texas A&M Parks and Recreation Depart- ment. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION DATE: COST: 1. Installation of 2 Wood Decks, Playground, Curb, and French Drain 1986 $ 12,179.50 2. Installation of Exercise Station 1985 $ 220.95 3. Installation of 2 Gazebos 1987 $ 20,220.00 TOTAL $ 32,620.45 34 JACK & DOROTHY MILLER PARK LOCATION: 501 Rock Prairie Road Zone 5 SIZE: 10 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1988 PURCHASE PRICE: 5 Acres Parkland Dedication 5 Acres for $ 75,000.00 PARK DESCRIPTION: Westchester Park is the first joint use project for the College Station Independent School District and the City of College Station. The cooperative effort between the two entities led to the design and implementation of a facility that would serve a dual purpose; during school hours the park will function as school playground and playing fields: the remainder of the time as a regular city park for use by the general public. The park has a fitness court, pavilion, basketball court, jogging track, picnic tables, and practice fields for baseball and soccer. Future improvements will be implemented cw tht ...I the h I ,...,7 ..,,..1. develops. Partial 1 funding for t e. development fth park e aa�.a ary uaau ui�. school and park u�.v�.av�.Jo. 1 cLLL10.1 1U1111111� 1V1 L11L. UI. Vl.1VtJ111L.11L of 1111J 1Jd1A was provided by the C.S.LS.D. in the amount of $75,000.00. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION 1. Full Park Development DATE: COST: 1989 $ 86,648.00 TOTAL $ 86,648.00 36 NOT TO SCALE • • • •• 4* • • • -J 0 .--1 8 C.) Z Z PRACTICE BALLFIELD tu cc czi 2 A o g S A -3c L•1 IX X 0 co CC "zZ CD 31 LEMONTREE PARK LOCATION: 1.300 Lemontree Zone 6 SIZE: 15.43 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1976, 1978 PURCHASE PRICE: Parkland Dedication PARK DESCRIPTION: Recreational features in this park include a basketball court, girls lighted softball fields, 3/4 mile concrete jogging exercise trail, playground, open play area, picnic units, pedestrian bridge, and a 30 car parking lot. DEVELOPMENTAL'`' DATA: " CONTRACT DESCRIPTION 1. Ball Field Irrigation 2. Parking Area 3. Park Development under the Neighborhood Parks Improvements 4. 1/2 Basketball Court DATE: 1978 1979 COST: $ 1,875.00 $ 19,024.00 1983 $ 58,900.00 1991 $ 12,000.00 TOTAL $ 81,799.00 38 w w CC Z CC 0 < CL L1.1 -J 00 LICK CREEK PARK LOCATION: East Rock Prairie Road SIZE: 515 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Natural Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1987 PURCHASE PRICE: Land Trade PARK DESCRIPTION: This park was established as part of land negotiations to establish a city industrial park. The site has a variety of plant and animal species indigenous to this area. The park currently offers several miles of trails and provides an excellent opportunity for hiking and nature study. DEVELOPMENTAL °DATA: ,. The park is undeveloped at this time. Future plans include the development of camp sites, addi- tional nature trails, interpretive centers and protected habitat for endangered plant species as well as other native flora and fauna. 40 0 z ec a pp °teas 4000 o 0 os n 0 d, a AQ LOCATION MAP Lady Tresses Tail ' W cc. •41 9S'O81'17 0, • 11 Q0 4 r 0, LINC t LN CENTER LOCATION: 1000 Eleanor Zone 6 SIZE: 8.0 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Multi -use Facility DATE ACQUIRED: 1978 PURCHASE PRICE: $ 80,000.00 PARK DESCRIPTION: Originally constructed as College Station Black High School, Lincoln Center has been utilized at one time or another as a neighborhood center, recreation center, Senior Citizens center, mainte- nance shop, and was formerly the headquarters for the College Station Parks and Recreation Depart- ment. The center now provides a variety of recreation and social services to the citizens of College Station. Renovation funding was through the 1985 bond issue. This facility will provide the nucleus for the Lincoln Center/Wayne Smith Park Corridor. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION DATE: COST: 1. Title V Renovation 1978 $ 19,557.00 2. Title III Renovation 1980 $ 9,480.00 3. Community Development Renovation 1981 $ 4,959.17 4. Complete Renovation 1985 $ 650,114.00 5. Landscaping 1985 $ 3,800.00 6. Landscaping, Playground, Walkways, and Lighting 1988 $ 34,518.04 7. Walkways, Landscaping, and Irrigation 1989 $ 34,585.00 TOTAL $ 757,013.21 42 LIONS PARK LOCATION: 501 Chappel Zone 2 SIZE: 1.5 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1967 PURCHASE PRICE: Donation PARK DESCRIPTION: Lions Park includes a 1/2 basketball court, playground, picnic units, and a parking area. A new iron fence, a walkway, area lighting and landscaping was added in 1990. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION DATE: COST: 1. Park Development 1981 $ 25,286.90 2. Park Improvements 1990 $ 29,000.70 TOTAL $ 54,287.60 44 z - 8 BASKETBALL PLAYGROUND z 0 w PICNIC UNIT CONCRETE CONCRETE BORDER NOT TO SCALE LIONS PARK :2 0 ft ; 0 to 3 Et tZ 8 03 Er) Et a_ LONGMIRE P LOCATION: 2600 Longmire Zone 5 SIZE: 4.16 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1977 PURCHASE PRICE: Parkland Dedication PARK DESCRIPTION: This beautiful wooded park contains picnic areas and nature trails. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION 1. Park Development under Neighborhood Parks Improvements DATE: 1983 COST: $ 9,500.00 $ 9,500.00 46 WATER FOUNTAIN .447 301 wo1,40 NOT TO SCALE LONGMIRE PARK ME' 'Y OAKS P LOCATION: 1401 Merry Oaks Zone 2 SIZE: 4.6 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1972 PURCHASE PRICE: Parkland Dedication PARK DESCRIPTION: Merry Oaks Park features an open play area, playground, low water crossing, nature trails, picnic units, basketball court, and jogging trail. DEVELOPMENTAL. DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION DATE: COST: 1. Park Development 1983 $ 28,455.50 2. Basketball Court, Jogging Trail, Sidewalks, Sign, Erosion Control Improvements 1991 $ 45,550.00 3. Concrete Sidewalk 1992 $ 4,800.00 $ 78,805.50 48 SYVO AllStigAlun —J 0 (J) Lu cc a. ni o 2 0 I._ Ls 1,7; 14 CC 6 C.) X 8 co OAKS P LOCATION: 1601 Stallings Zone 2 SIZE: 7.5 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1970 PURCHASE PRICE: Parkland Dedication PARK DESCRIPTION: Oaks Park features a pavilion with a BBQ pit, restrooms, and an attached deck area. A wooden pedestrian bridge links the pavilion to a lighted basketball court. Custom designed conversation pits serve in lieu of picnic tables and are scattered throughout the park. The conversation pits are linked by a 1/4 mile asphalt jogging track which winds through the mature Post Oaks. Partial funding for this park was provided by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Project No. 48-00567 in the amount of $91,252.00. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION DATE: COST: 1. Pavilion, Deck, and Bridge Construction 1978 $ 38,862.18 2. Tennis Court, Jogging Trail, and Picnic Area Construction 1979 $ 52,390.00 3. Pavilion Replacement and Renovation 1984 $ 32,456.54 4. Concrete Sidewalks 1987 $ 13,486.00 5. Court Renovation, Brick Pavers, and Retaining Walls 1992 $ 18,700.00 TOTAL $ 155,894.72 50 OAKS PARK NOT TO SCALE AY PARK LOCATION: Munson and Woodland Pkwy. Zone 2 SIZE: 1.9 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1939 PURCHASE PRICE: PARK DESCRIPTION: Parkway Park's primary use is to alleviate flooding around the surrounding neighborhood. The park contains a playground and a picnic table. DEVELOPMENTAL -DATA CONTRACT DESCRIPTION DATE: 1. Playground, Picnic Unit, Sign, Drinking Fountain 1991 COST: $ 14,000.00 TOTAL $ 14,000.00 52 NTREE PARK LOCATION: 2505 Raintree Drive Zone 4 SIZE: 12.98 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1978, 1982 PURCHASE PRICE: Parkland Dedication Donation PARK DESCRIPTION: Designed to compliment the surrounding neighborhood, Raintree Park provides a good example of park planning to integrate urban park facilities into a natural low -land ecosystem. This park boasts many natural amenities such as Wolfpen Creek, sharp slopes, and 50' Water Oaks along with developed facilities including a playground, seating area, picnic units, kiosk, and trails. Develop- ment funding was through the 1981 bond issue. Future plans include the addition of trails and related amenities. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION 1. Full Park Development under the Neighborhood Parks Improvements 1983 2. Installation of two 15' Light Fixtures 1988 3. Jogging Trail, Signage, & Volleyball Court 1992 DATE: COST: $ 45,850.00 $ 8,750.00 $ 32,350.00 TOTAL $ 86,950.00 54 RAINTREE'PARK PICNIC UNIT RICH CARTER PARK LOCATION: 1800 Brazoswood Zone 2 SIZE: 7.14 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1983 PURCHASE PRICE: Parkland Dedication PARK DESCRIPTION: Richard Carter Park is College Station's only historically significant park. It is the site of the Richard Carter homestead. Carter was College Station's earliest settler, arriving from Alabama in 1831. His original land grant, of one league (4,428 acres) from the Mexican government, covers most of which is College Station today. Development for the park includes an interpretive center with displays about Richard Carter and the reconstruction of the original water well. There is also a discovery garden area featuring decks, seating, indigenous plants, a historical marker, and a bronze statue by Albert Pedulla. The development of this park was an officially sanctioned Texas Sesquicentennial Project. In 1991, Richard Carter and his wife's graves were moved from an adjacent site to the park itself. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION DATE: COST: 1. Full Park Development 1985 $ 100,000.00 2. Irrigation and Native Plant Garden 1987 $ 24,988.00 3. Iron Fencing around Graves 1991 $ 1,430.00 4. Headstones and Footstones 1992 $ 7,200.00 TOTAL $ 133,618.00 56 BRAZOSWOOD z W ti cc W 0 • o H z m O O C '^ .W C • U 6.W o • ar a HWY 6 BYPASS SANDSTONE PARK LOCATION: 1700 Sebesta Zone 4 SIZE: 15.21 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1983 PURCHASE PRICE: $ 251,040.00 PARK DESCRIPTION: Sandstone Park provides temporary soccer and baseball facilities for residents on the east side of the Highway 6 Bypass. The park consists of 2 soccer fields with bleachers, 4 practice fields, and plenty of parking for everyone. Future plans include permanent athletic and neighborhood recreation facilities. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION 1. Temporary Park Development DATE: 1989 COST: $ 19,033.80 TOTAL $ 19,033.80 58 SANDSTONE DRIVE W1 a-4Z X 0>- .-1(ZHJ 2 Pt 8-1 ASHEO8 cN 0 00 �wwOO V aO z - <I-00Cr) w 2 cJ ri v - - i C� C i I- 0 w a w u ¢ a 1 1-4 i O a w I-- < I- CO CY w C.)ZZDU O CO Z w-0 <L 0 I1 V) 1- W >JWW,--1 z = Q1~-130 w 0 0 aZ0zw .--1 .-, w E 30-) W 1- 6 '-1 >- u) F- & 0 0 wlr HQd 0 z 0 :1�": '-'`f�r:i�•:: :•:tiff _ _ : •ti\L. h SANDSTONE PARK W >- Q F— Z CC W W 0_ W O 0_ H F— Z H CC F— cCV) F— H V)t� L1J J CD W O J = O C) CJ V)... W Z O cc c < a' co SOUTHWOOD ATHLETIC PARK LOCATION: 1600 Rock Prairie Road Zone 5 SIZE: 44.65 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Community Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1980 PURCHASE PRICE: • $ 267,900.00 PARK DESCRIPTION: Southwood Athletic Park, as the name implies, is College Station's first Community Park devoted almost exclusively to athletics. Designed by the staff in response to perceived community needs, the park facilities consist of four little league (200') lighted baseball fields, two senior league (300') lighted baseball fields, two adult lighted soccer fields, three youth soccer fields, two concession buildings, a 75' pool with bathhouse, four lighted tennis courts, 2 lighted basketball courts, a play- ground, a BBQ pavilion with horseshoes, volleyball court, and parking for 550 cars. Funding for this project was through the 1981 bond issue along with a matching grant through the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Project number 48-008-69 in the amount of $ 842,750.00. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION DATE: 1. Architectural/Engineering, Water/Sewer, Roadways/ Parking, Irrigation, Fencing, Hydroseeding, Lighting, Concession and BBQ Pavilion 1983 2. Pool, Tennis and Basketball Courts 1984 3. Sign and Flower Beds 1986 4. Landscape Improvements 1 1987 5. Tennis Asphalt Overlay and Resurface, Basketball Court Resurface 6. Tree Plantings 1993 1991 COST: $1,212,008.10 $ 701,546.00 $ 2,100.00 $ 31,708.00 $ 63,600.00 $ 3,333.33 TOTAL $2,014,295.43 60 G / / / / / 3CINVZI9 0 w (1) I- 0 _J LU .--4 - J LL - J 0 -I 0 < C4 CO w CO CC w w 0 C.) 0 0 < LU -J 0 CO w I- 0 • (/) - J 0 _J • w • ,--I LL -J 0 1-4 -J 2 a. (/) 0 -J w U- CC UJ C.) 8 o u) w xc < 0 UJ ›- -J CO YOUTH SOCCER FIELD UJ (1) I__ -J • • •----erlir • • 1-4 -J LL - -J 0 -I 0 < t,-1 CO w < CO / • 0 cD V) t— a. Q f z • 0 t7i qzc La O a- u co 'Ct ILL LJ THOMAS PARK LOCATION: 1300 James Parkway Zone 2 SIZE: 16.10 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Community Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1938 PURCHASE PRICE: Donation PARK DESCRIPTION: Thomas Park, although smaller than typical community parks, serves in that capacity by virtue of the fact that it is the largest park in its respective park zone. Thomas is also one of the oldest parks in College Station. Facilities include a 25 meter swimming pool with bathhouse, two lighted tennis courts, two basketball courts, picnic units, two playgrounds, two soccer fields, a pavilion, a lighted jogging track (1/3 milc), and parking for 27 cars. Partial funding for this park was provided by matching funds from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Project Numbers 48-00-567 in the amount of $184,500.00 and 48-00-764 in r fi�� the amount of � i a,750.00. Thomas Park is dedicated to Mable Clare Thomas for the work she has done for the community. DEVELOPMENTAL' '.DATA:.. ,, CONTRACT DESCRIPTION 1. Swimming Pool and Pool Fencing 2. Tennis Courts, Basketball Courts, Playground, Drainage, Parking, Irrigation, Jogging Track, Lighting 1982 3. Wood Decks and Pool Shelter $ 177,088.00 4. Sign and Flower Beds ' 1985 $ 7,496.28 1986 $ 1,300.00 5. Playground 1989 6. Concrete Block Wall $ 13,300.00 1992 $ 3,900.00 7. Pool Renovation 1993 $ 136,194.00 DATE: 1980 COST: $ 357,568.00 TOTAL $ 696,846.28 62 WAYNE SMITH PARK LOCATION: 401 Luther Zone 6 SIZE: 2.46 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED:. 1954 PURCHASE PRICE: $ 1,900.00 PARK DESCRIPTION: Wayne Smith Park was originally designed as a Little League field with bleachers. In 1987, the Parks and Recreation Department completely renovated the park to accommodate a playground, plenty of seating, picnic units, and a full basketball court. This park is dedicated to Mr. Wayne Smith for his foresight and efforts in establishing the first Little League fields in College Station. Future plans include the development of a corridor to connect this site with Lincoln Center. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: ` CONTRACT DESCRIPTION DATE: 1. Demolition of Existing Ballfield and Buildings 1984 2. Complet Construction of Basketball Court, Playground, and Picnic Units 3. Lighting COST: $ 4,300.00 1987 $ 75,933.00 1990 $ 12,000.00 TOTAL $ 92,233.00 64 NOT TO SCALE K8ONTCLA}B z •zt a_ '4' •=' tu • 0 z •••- 2 I -- CC w If, -3 Cc 8 05 5 co ce • PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS WINDWOOD PARK LOCATION: Appomattox Zone 4 SIZE: 1 Acre CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1984 PURCHASE PRICE: Parkland Dedication PARK DESCRIPTION: Windwood Park features a playground, shelter, picnic unit, seating areas, decorative paving, and an open play area. The design has been adapted to the heavily wooded area of the site to preserve as much vegetation as possible. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION 1. Full Park Development DATE: 1985 COST: $ 25,000.00 TOTAL $ 25,000.00 66 F- cn 0 CC 03 APPOMATTOX (1) w w CO 0 w 0 0 0 0 0 < za NOT TO SCALE WOLF PEN CREEK PARK LOCATION: 1015 Colgate St. Zone 3 SIZE: 19.49 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Community Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1977, 1991 PURCHASE PRICE: 7.69 Acres Existing Parkland 1.59 Acres for $ 19,235.77 5.04 Acres for $125,000.00 PARK DESCRIPTION: Wolf Pen Creek Park is being developed as the first phase of the Wolf Pen Creek Corridor Master Plan. This plan was approved by the College Station City Council in 1988. The goal of this com- prehensive plan is to recognize the interrelationships of drainage, erosion control and recreation along Wolf Pen Creek, as well as to create a community attraction for residents and out-of-town guests. The park will offer a variety of outdoor recreation experiences for all ages including walking, fishing, picnicing, and playground activities. The amphitheater will offer a wide array of entertain- .._e_. with outdoor _- .-l-- n festi---t I- ------ also L - � for - • rti__ Additional -1 entertain- ment with vu�uvvi concerts, plays and ica�tvnia. t� may- also �c rented for private parties. nuuiuviini information may be obtained by contacting the Parks and Recreation Department. Partial funding for this project was provided by the -Texas Parks,& Wildlife Department,. Project No. 20-00328'in the amount of $500,000.00 and the Nina Heard Astin Trust in the amount of $100,000.00. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION DATE: COST: 1 Phase I Development: Amphitheater, Lake, Playground, Restrooms, Picnic Shelter, Bridge, Trails, Parking, Lighting, Signs, Landscaping, and Irrigation 1992 $1,466,098.37 2. Wrought Iron Fence, Sidewalks, Stairway 1 1993 $ 102,576.00 3. Sound Equipment Stage and Dance Floor Addition 1994 $ 22,913.00 TOTAL $1,570,967.37 68 WO 0 D C ' EK PARK LOCATION: 9100 Shadowcrest Dr. Zone 4 SIZE: 6.6 Acres CLASSIFICATION: Neighborhood Park DATE ACQUIRED: 1981 PURCHASE PRICE: 6.6 Acres Parkland Dedication PARK DESCRIPTION: Woodcreek Park is a heavily wooded park with a small creek meandering through it. The design of the park retained much of the natural wooded areas allowing the residents the opportunity to enjoy this beauty. The park has a playground, a 1/3 mile jogging trail, a half basketball court, a volleyball court, and two bridges. Also, lighting was installed for futher enjoyment and security of the resi- dents. DEVELOPMENTAL DATA: CONTRACT DESCRIPTION 1. Full Park Development DATE: COST: 1991 $ 124,412.00 TOTAL $ 124,412.00 70 WOODCREEK ct a 0 W Y i0 0 I ` Y Q N K � W 7.1 CC CC 0 0 u i CC a PAVILIONS CITY OF COLLEGE STATION RENTAL AND SECURITY DEPOSIT INFORMATION 764-3773 or 764-3414 1. Reservations for picnic shelters must be made between the hours of 8 am to 5 pm, Monday thru Friday. The deposit and rental fee must be paid at the Parks and Recreation Office, 1000 Krenek Tap Road, before the reservation is confirmed. 2. Cancellations must be made in writing no later than seven (7) days prior to the date of use. Failure to notify the Parks and Recreation Office will result in loss of rental fee. 3. Lights must be off at 1:00 am. NO EXCEPTIONS (excluding Oaks Park, where they have to be off by 11:00 pm) 4. Any person wishing to sell food or drink items in a park must apply for a Park Vendors Permit at the Parks and Recreation office and a Health Permit from the Health Department (361-4450). 5. The rental deposit will be refunded to you if the facility is left clean, undamaged and the keys are returned during the facility checkout time. The deposit will then be mailed to the name and address on the reservation form. This takes approximately 8 - 10 working days. 6. All rentals and deposits will be paid with cash or check made payable to the City of College Station. 7. All other picnic facilities that are not listed below are available on a first come first served basis. 8. The emergency number for the Police Dispatch is 764-3600 and Utility Dispatch is 764-3638. 9. Athletic fields must be reserved seperately from pavilion rentals through the College Station Recreation Department (764-3486). You must obey all "FIELD CLOSED" signs. 10. CROWD CAPACITY: If you anticipate a crowd in excess of the maximum capacity, please let us know so that we may provide extra trash cans and paper products. 11. Campfires, hot air ballons, tents, etc., are not allowed without prior consideration and Director approval. 12. Dunking booths, pony rides, off -road vehicles, driving of golf balls, firearms, airguns, crossbows, and bows and arrows; -are-strictly prohibited... 13. All vehicles must park in designated areas on pavement only. SA 1 URDAY - MONDAY - MAXIMUM SUNDAY FRIDAY THURSDAY PAVILION CAPACITY RATE / DAY RATE/ DAY RATE/DAY DEPOSIT Central 200 $125.00 I $75.00 $50.00 $100.00 Southwood 300 $125.00 $75.00 $50.00 $100.00 Bee Creek 100 $ 30.00 $30.00 $30.00 0 Oaks 50 $ 30.00 $30.00 $30.00 $50.00 Thomas 30 $ 15.00 $15.00 $15.00 0 Arboretum 25 0 0 0 0 Multiple day usage discounts are available, inquire at the Parks and Recreation Office (764-3773) 75 BEE CREEK PAVILION LOCATION: Bee Creek Park CAPACITY 100 People FACILITIES: Lights/ Electrical Outlets Water Sand Volleyball Court 12 Picnic Tables BBQ Pit RENTAL FEE: $ 30.00 DEPOSIT: None DESCRIPTION: Bee Creek 'Pavilion is one of our first picnic facilities. It is located behind Adamson swimming pool at 1900 Anderson in Bee Creek Park. This shelter accommodates up to 100 people and features a BBQpit, lights, electrical outlets, water. A playground, a sand volleyball court, 4 tennis courts and a 100 car parking lot are also located nearby. Restrooms are available at the pool building. Softball fields, available during the off-season, August - March, and a 50 meter pool, open during the sum- mer season, are close by. 76 OUTLETS ELECTRICAL TO SCALE 1— BAR-B-QUE PITS . • . . 0 uJ W Z IX 0 _J W CO a- z cc 14.1 '4' Q 0 Cc t,•• If! 44 8 8 co • 0 CENTRAL PAVILION LOCATION: Central Park CAPACITY 200 People FACILITIES: Restrooms Kitchen 21 Picnic Tables BBQ Pits RENTAL FEE: $ 125 / $75 / $50 DEPOSIT: $ 100.00 DESCRIPTION: -" Central -Park is located at 1000 Krenek Tap Road in Central Park. Nestled among the Oak trees, offering lots of shade and a feeling of privacy. This shelter accommodates 200 people and features complete kitchen and restroom facilities. Parking will accommodate approximately 100 cars. Nature trails, a pond with a fishing pier, a sand volleyball court, basketball court, 2 tennis courts, and a playground located nearby. Also, not far away are softball fields that are available by reservation. 78 0 w 0 - - w z ww MIX ti cc a ao WZm o 2 t Q C wWG rc Le as hY PARKING AREA O • S PAVILION LOCATION: Oaks Park CAPACITY 50 People FACILITIES: Restroorns Water Lighting/ Electrical Outlets 5 Picnic Tables BBQ Pits RENTAL FEE: $ 30.00 DEPOSIT: $ 50.00 DESCRIPTION: The newly renovated Oaks Pavilion is ideal for small social events. This pavilion is located at 1601 Stallings Drive off of Harvey Road in Oaks Park. The shelter will accommodate 50 people and has restrooms, lights, electrical outlets, and water. Curb side parking will accommodate approxi- mately 25 to 30 cars. A basketball court and a deck are located nearby. 80 0 w. 0 0 0 0 TO SCALE H O Z SOUTHWOOD PAVILION LOCATION: Southwood Park CAPACITY: 300 People FACILITIES: R.estrooms Lighting/ Electrical Outlets Kitchen 27 Picnic Tables BBQ Pits Sand Volleyball Court Horseshoe Pits Playground RENTAL FEE: $ 125 / $75 / $50 DEPOSIT: $ 100.00 DESCRIPTION: This is our newest and largest pavilion. It is located at 1600 Rock Prairie Road in Southwood Valley Athletic Park. There may not be many trees but there is always a breeze blowing. The pavil- ion will accommodate 300 people and features complete kitchen and restroom facilities. Approxi- mately 200 parking spaces are available. Playing fields, a 25 yd swimming pool, tennis courts, and basketball courts are in close proximity. 82 THOMAS PAVILION LOCATION: Thomas Park CAPACITY: 30 People FACILITIES: Water Lighting/ Electrical Outlets 4 Picnic Tables BBQ Pit RENTAL FEE: $ 15.00 DEPOSIT: None DESCRIPTION: Small but adequate. This pavilion is located at 1300 James Parkway in Thomas Park. It will accommodate 30 people and is ideal for small gatherings, birthday parties, and family get-togethers. Water and electricity is available under the shelter. Limited parking is available at the pool or along Puryear Drive. Tennis courts, a playground, a 25 meter pool, restrooms, horseshoe pits, and volley- ball poles are close by. 84 WATER FOUNTAIN 8c HOSE BIB ELECTRICAL OUTLET BAR-B- QUE O • ti Ct 4 w Z- .� m o� Q zi V1 wW c 0 u CO CO CC Q 4 O TO S CA L E 0 Z