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1998 Northgate Design Guidelines ii We 144,,1,1' W r [d RAPS t S t�Y(AA Cl 11 (i ' ..: € "' di, City off College Station, Texas _, . „ :„.,,,,,,, NORTHGATE t., ,.. ..,,, ,, , ,, „,. ir. DESIGN F N 1GUIDELINES ,, :1 r r 1r { 1 k7��Ns r r "n i- ,5 } �. fir# ' W 1 ij Prepared by: Planning Division 11 Development Services City of College Station, Texas September 1998 L] , .,•----,, .,„* I r i }Cf:4\IL , iS e r x. 's moi:3; 1 f: o 'S `i eZNvYsFkl �'` L a k k 411.4:'44* f ;- 1. I I Cl City of College Station, Texas NORTHGATE DESIGN GUIDELINES Prepared by: Planning Division Development Services 1101 Texas Avenue P.O. Box 9960 College Station, Texas 77842 Ph. (409) 764-3570 September 1998 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 1 HISTORY 2 ARCHITECTURAL BACKGROUND 3 PURPOSE 4 GOALS 5 HOW TO USE THE GUIDELINES 6 SIGNS 8 AWNINGS AND CANOPIES 10 BICYCLE PARKING 11 STREET ELEMENTS STREET FURNITURE 13 STREET LIGHTS 15 STREETSCAPING and LANDSCAPING 16 SIDEWALKS 18 MAILBOXES 19 ARCHITECTURAL CHARACTER 20 STYLES 20 MASS and SCALE 20 COLOR 21 BUILDING ELEMENTS 22 SITE DESIGN 23 BUILDING ORIENTATION 23 PARKING SCREENING 23 SERVICE AREAS 23 DRIVE - THRU 26 ACCESSIBILITY 27 Northgate Design Guidlines CURB AND GUTTER 27 GLOSSARY 28 RESOURCES 32 APPENDIX A-NORTHGATE ZONING DISTRICTS APPENDIX B -BIKELOOP PLAN APPENDIX C - ROOF TYPES APPENDIX D -PARKING SCREENING Northgate Design Guidlines INTRO UCTION Northgate is a special place, unique in both its campus environment and historic character. It is a place of mixed land uses including businesses, churches, and residential areas, all located adjacent to Texas A&MUniversity. It is a place with interesting architecture, combining traditional forms and materials in a variety of different styles. Northgate is bound by the City of Bryan to the North, College Avenue to the East, Wellborn Road to the West, and University Drive to the South. (See map of the District boundaries in Appendix A) However, the unique character of Northgate is threatened by new incompatible development. Since the growth surge of the 1960's, historical areas of Northgate have been overshadowed by strip commercial and vehicular-oriented developments that are typical of"suburban" areas. Misguided suburban growth and redevelopment could further diminish the unique character of the Northgate area. Over the past two decades, attempts to enhance Northgate have been largely piecemeal and lacking in financial and political support. Public support for Northgate has recently increased dramatically. The College Station City Council ranked Northgate among the top strategic issues over the past few years. In 1995, citizens voted in support of a Northgate Bond Proposition which earmarked funds to finance redevelopment in Northgate. In January of 1996, the City Council adopted the . �� Northgate Redevelopment Plan. These design guidelines seek to describe in detail and facilitate �xwimplementation of the design recommendations presented in the Plan. In order for the distinctive character of Northgate 9s, n 'Z k / Y', 144 ` to be preserved, development needs to follow more compact land use patterns that are compatible with its original character and give adequate 4,1e consideration to its surroundings. It is this vision of Northgate's future that is articulated by the City Council through the Northgate Redevelopment Plan and is encouraged by the design guidelines presented in this manual. Northgate in the mid-1940's Northgate Design Guidelines 1 HISTORY Northgate originated to provide commercial services at the northern gate of the A&M College. At the time, the College was isolated from Bryan and had no provisions for commercial and residential services. In 1912, A&M College directors set aside land on the northern side of campus so that businesses could be established to serve the ,"71 �, yycampus. A butcher shop, shoe repair, 3/a 11 � � � , � � ��� � . �i � tailor, barber, and photo gallery were some "t �fr 11`:: of the first services to be offered in the Northgate area. In the early 1920's the Boyett's Grocery Store and Post Office were relocated to the Northgate area. Northgate,1921 Between 1920 and 1927, this wooden strip center was the only commercial area within the vicinity of the campus. In 1928, A&M College ordered all commercial businesses to move off campus. This led to a number of businesses relocating in Northgate. In 1929, a fire destroyed many of the wooden structures including Youngblood's cleaners, Sosolik's studio, and Mrs. Parkhill's Cafe. On Sosolik's property, a new brick building was constructed which housed a pharmacy and cafe. In addition, the early 1930's saw the expansion of Northgate with the addition of Holik's, Northgate Barber Shop, Charlie's Grocery, and Zubik's Uniform Taylor Shop. In 1940, Judson Loupot opened his first store in a seven foot wide shop. In 1938, the City of College Station incorporated and leased space for the first City Hall on College Main. In 1947, as the city grew, a new City Hall was built on Church Avenue, now Cafe Eccell. The 1930's through the 1950's brought a large < rPknumber of homes into Northgate. The addition 1 # of housing to the area provided an increased customer base which allowed area businesses to thrive. Duddley's Draw,311 University Drive By the 1950's and 60's, Northgate saw the addition of a number of churches and bars into the Northgate area. Since the 1960's there has been a continual expansion of the commercial and residential areas, including more multi-family apartments and condominiums. Northgate Design Guidelines 2 In April of 1975, the Northgate Merchant's Association was formed. This organization worked to address problems of traffic, appearance, and publicity. They hosted street parties that were highly popular. Today, Northgate is still a thriving campus `� ` neighborhood. It includes a wide variety of „ housing types and a thriving commercial sector that includes groceries, fast food, and x��t �, specialty shops. z j However, the urban nature of the area has created difficult traffic and pedestrian safety _ y issues that need to be addressed. In addition, 33,: r� ,� � 4 the age of the buildings in the area has led to serious deterioration problems. Northgate, 1970's The Northgate Redevelopment Plan seeks to address many of the issues that are relevant in Northgate today. Through regulation and formalized design guidelines, the future Northgate can become a healthier and safer campus neighborhood. Northgate Design Guidelines 3 ARCHITECTURAL BACKGROUND Most of the historic fabric of Northgate consists of common local building forms of the 1940's and 1950's The Historic Resources Survey documents the historic homes, churches and businesses that can be found throughout the Northgate area. COMMERCIAL STYLE The commercial core of the Northgate area consists of One and Two-Part commercial blocks. The One-Part commercial block is a simple box with a decorated facade. The Two-Part commercial block is generally limited to structures of two to four stories. The single story is the lower zone, at street level. This lower level is generally occupied by retail stores, while the upper zone normally includes office or residential space. Another example of the architectural diversity of Northgate is the Campus Theater, which is the only example of Art Deco within the Northgate area. The theater was built in 1930. Today it serves as a dance hall. RESIDENTIAL STYLE The residential areas of Northgate are filled with a variety of housing styles. The majority are small and medium Queen Anne style homes. There are also a number of American Four-Square. These homes are relatively plain and square two-story structures with a one story front porch. built between 1910-1920. Simple, modest bungalows, built between 1910-1925, are also found throughout the Northgate residential area. Many of these homes once were located on the A&M College Campus, but were moved when the College decided it did not want to be in the business of providing housing for the faculty and staff of the school. yr, „)'�0.),�xr r � 4 � 1t �Pfi 1.J1 44,)••ir fb1W''4L s • {gyp(4t ,y�1 $' 12h � �"Ayl �A,d (.�3' ��K }, .. t rt11 S $ '1 j firEE `l1S Yf 7 5= • �f �i5. v� i 9. �. rr t k# i. k. {t ��iii ri orf . 1 K ...... ... �A,.>,f � .+.+.ba.+:<a 4.4 ..., =.1� . ..a,+.i.4G` ...... '`" ritar� . 415 Tauber,Cottage Style, built in 1915 400 Boyett,Queen Anne,built in 1902 Northgate Design Guidelines 4 INSTITZTI'IONAL STYLE Churches also have a historic role in Northgate. St. Mary's Catholic Church was built in 1926. In the 1950's, the church expanded and built a new student center and chapel. A&M Methodist church, first built in 1923 as a temporary structure, remained in place until the construction of an educational building and sanctuary in the late 1940's and early 1950's. The A&M Presbyterian Church was first an Army Chapel in Victoria, Texas. In 1948, the church was moved to Northgate. Ernest Langford was mayor of College Station ‘'T'� ���, `�` � � from 1942 through 1965. Langford, a Professor �� g ` of Architecture, first designed the A&M Church ' }`� ,'', ' of Christ, in the early 1930's. The building has 1 ,k;' ;� 4;:ittAte,fi since seen additions and major alterations 1 ,`II � .) 5 IP'�` Langford also designed the first City Hall at 101 ,, ' �� '�{, ^g' ry )� ' r� Church Street. The home at 303 Cherry was i ; ,�� A ; '= designed by Langford's architecture students as �" ,. a class project. Langford made significant architectural contributions to Northgate and the city as a whole. 202 College Main.built in 1935 : Iii�3 L y a VP,1111/:114 t., kir 0,,4,1 , F� ,, F g ate d,4,, tfi P is.1.' f4 / ✓.i . , 1 i 1 {4 n, tr,', /0 4 t' 2l v.. ): M y�� B v4l i as 4 1� s _ r ", , tit 4,.r 'Ik i n h r k i. ' i9t rYt„ r v piss t Hvo,,1 fin- w f ' yy 1 . N 2,G fij'. k f u 0- d t zb, �,& ?� ,F A&M Methodist Church, Gothic Style,built in 1951 Northgate Design Guidelines 5 PURPOSE This manual was created as an "ideabook" for both the professional and the layman. The following sections present design guidelines which will be incorporated into the Northgate redevelopment process. These guidelines are not regulatory, but provide guidance for complying with the Northgate Redevelopment Plan and Zoning Ordinance. Y,y3 `°`"..«� -zjt• z �Fs# � ftr t Oxy f?as s ys;'f.-peh .r., 1,4 giff� } Ffi ''{ r (f� � fC3 1 tt t s5 Fi's x >�t rAs tr�'q ( pit t ''( Rut ttr° ' d Yf.l , t Prx. Ktlar F - ,'� "t '� iE� R 4f+ Y • 1 }usE :011 '""�" i�'''� t+��r� 6 yr ��"Flk.. � : Z ;.-•YtrN '^ !' C 3 Y i7i 55'' '{<f � a•+.aa+ru .M itt f t if S tT �'� l �t vo sn7r 3Y}3 - a r't x tit,x,.z}C.fb fai^` 17'rt'7rt1; t,5�da r r Cid + d 7S r W»wSU`r 2 3 nt �,tc"1rrAtt# ''s r s • k?�fd ftP'�",rN�'.u3�+hvr3s r t.'s r s yap o- Y �§ � ,s :� WOMO,li Ittibit$411iPPI::'d:;Y! 4000 fSi . 4,1001.44q igezt , w t a 44" The Spark.building 1995. The Sparks building in 1997 after facade renovations. GOALS The goals of this manual seek to improve the physical appearance of the Northgate area and to create a safe and healthy environment for residents and visitors. In addition these goals provide City Staff, Northgate Revitalization Board members, and the development community a guide emphasizing appropriate redevelopment practices. It is not the intent to freeze the Northgate District in time. The Northgate area has continually evolved, and should continue to do so as long as that change does not overshadow the character of the historic core. General design goals for the entire Northgate District: • To promote a sense of identity for the District. • To minimize negative impacts on adjacent properties from inappropriate development. • To encourage pedestrian activity. • To convey a sense of human scale. • To improve the aesthetic qualities of the district. Goals for the treatment of historic properties in Historic Northgate Subdistrict: • To preserve the integrity of each historical structure by preserving its character- Northgate Design Guidelines 6 defining features. Goals for design of new buildings and alteration of non-historic structures in the Historic Northgate Subdistrict: • To accommodate change, in a manner that is compatible with the historic character of Northgate, without imitating it. • To encourage new construction that is similar to that seen historically in overall mass and scale, materials, and treatment of openings. ke , r„. „„ II III 1VPk? 32114 5-4 qfP This building, built in 1950, was recently renovated. HOW TO USE THE GUIDELINES Property owners, real estate agents, tenants, and architects should use the guidelines when beginning projects in the Northgate District. This will help establish an appropriate direction for the design. The guidelines will be used in two ways. The City staff will use the guidelines when working with and advising property owners. The Northgate Revitalization Board will use the guidelines in the review process. This document will guide decisions, but not dictate them. Because each project has special circumstances that require consideration, the Northgate Revitalization Board will review each project on a case-by-case basis. Northgate Design Guidelines 7 SIGNS Neighborhood Commercial Districts depend heavily on effective sign design and location. Signs play an important role in the appearance of urban commercial areas. The location and design characteristics of signs strongly influence people's perceptions of the district and its individual businesses. First impressions have a lasting influence, making it essential that the Northgate area present an appealing image to potential customers, tenants and investors. Signs that are designed without regard for the surrounding architecture and placement, can detract from the district's overall appearance. Signs should be scaled more appropriately to a pedestrian environment and designed to accommodate shoppers strolling along sidewalks and motorists driving at slower speeds. Such a pace allows people to take in more of their surroundings at a glance. 1,.P ,,4,4:441,,,,P1 ii', ' '.1; ' ,„t-,,,,,,,.:,,,,,,,---. , ,, -, \ 6 '':.•'.*::' j tt r ffekt !f( /l 1 L::;':,-37-,,QZzti',:itA,T-vt;-,'' 1, 1 'j : I:Am:0: ,,, .,,,-, This chain restaurant, in downtown Ft. Worth, changed its I restaurant menu is built into the side of the signage to better fit in the context of the building. building which allows pedestrians to view menu options without eliminating sidewalk space. The following types of signs are all encouraged: • Icon or graphic signs: These are a type of sign that illustrate, by their shape, the nature of the business within. They are the easiest signs to read and are therefore well-suited to vehicular as well as pedestrian traffic. • Window signs: These are pedestrian oriented. They allow for the majority of the display area to be open for pedestrian window shopping. These signs should not cover more than 33% of the window area. • Hanging signs: These are hung from sidewalk coverings or mounted perpendicular to the sidewalk. They are very effective for pedestrians. • Flush mounted signs: These are signboards or individual die-cut letters placed on the face of the buildings. Usually there is a recess or horizontal molded band on the building that was designed to accommodate the sign. • Perpendicular signs: These are hung from exterior façade of the building. This style of sign is appropriate for the Northgate area on a limited basis. No more than one perpendicular sign should be allowed every 35 feet. All perpendicular signs should be modest in size. Northgate Design Guidelines 8 .1)41411:.,v, f 61 n \n i' `` .� ✓ wvww y J 4 1...I is 5 I"+- , I It ..ri t y Sr i iii jt3 1 GSI t:11 .; �1t I S I �t z These hanging signs are targeted at the pedeshrian• This combination of signs provides a pedestrian oriented sign and a vehicular oriented sign Pllacement and Design of signs ® Signs should relate in placement and size to other building elements. o Signs should not obscure other building elements such as windows, cornices, or decorative details. e Sign material, style and color should compliment the building facade. e Individual shop signs in a single storefront should relate to each other in design, size, color, placement on the building, and lettering style. © Wood or metal is recommended O Illuminated plastic signs are strongly discouraged. e Letters exceeding 14" in height are discouraged in pedestrian oriented areas. Northgate i e ogn Guidelines 9 AVI9NIINOS AND CANOPIES Awnings and canopies shelter pedestrians from sun and rain and protect display window merchandise from ultraviolet rays or sunlight exposure damage. • Due to the diversity of architectural styles, both horizontal fixed canopies and fabric awnings are encouraged. • Canopies should be compatible within a given block. • Colors should be compatible with the overall color scheme of the facade. Solid colors or simple muted striped patterns are appropriate. • Rigid canopies are encouraged to provide recessed lights that illuminate the sidewallc. tyi• f � c l;i��`Ye'ARA+� •`'-4 I' �• f � ��• .,_ +SS' MN T.SI tF7,. • t • h `�F l.y �MW + ' 1 t ri ,G°� r - t k'i^ h� �. Ott' 4 � f R ill ! '�I: �. T 1# '��� �: 451rP �• — 1 } ti °" s, t l t i 9 . ra 1 err ' '1 4� _ r vrmd7l sir •b"4: ry;r,, 4& 4X1' 'Fins fabric awning in downtown Ft. Worth empahsizcs the This block provides a variety of styles and materials of awnings entry to this boutique. and canopies. • 0. + mut.l l'l.S ilk t .. :J t This building effectively uses both fabric awnings for the upper windows and a canopy over the walkway. This canopy is even with the surrounding canopies. Northgate Design Guidelines 10 BICYCLE PARKING Both businesses and customers can benefit from safe, accessible bicycle parking. Providing the proper bicycle parking not only accommodates the bicyclist, but also can help to discourage improper bike parking which can cause problems such as blocking sidewalks or interfering with handrails. Therefore, the building's design should provide the necessary visual clues to tell the bicyclist where to park. Bike parking should be located in well lit convenient locations with adequate surveillance. • Consolidation of bicycle parking is encouraged. • Bicycle parking in the front of the building is encouraged. However, where this is not possible, the side or rear of the building may be used. • Parking should be located in visible and easily accessible locations. • If a building has access to a street that is designated as a bike lane or route on the Bikeway Master Plan, bicycle parking should be located along these streets. (see map Appendix B) • Placing bicycle parking near building entrances with adequate surveillance from building occupants and visitors is encouraged. Bicycle Racks should be compatible with the character of the street. • The bicycle rack below has been approved by the Northgate Revitilization Board and its use is strongly encouraged. • Muted colors are encouraged Acceptable colors include bronze, maroon, and dark green. • Other designs and colors may be considered by the Northgate Revitilization Board. :�::%:si;Y�r;%i::.%i:?$i:::�;i:::;i!::i:f!�ii:i'.'r,'':ii<},y,••Y.,,v:�:Y..,.\y,\.,n.1.. :Y:ii::Eist:;`.:v;iE:;>::;::;::::•.;•.;�:;::{5::..v?i�:Z%;�.5•,�.,::<3:��'tik...'�:c':S: 4iii};;'i.tii:j?:Ei;{rii?moi}yF ii§:}:'{Y<�i\;v•xF ..,{.::\\•:n+w::S.Y: 4YYC{F:•.`•A:{F:;+;�:::•,.:<:F:;•}}i•:$:.CC{?::{:n,.;.:i"•\4,:\�::i:?C}: ................ • z::c.:F:'•}:;•`.kit::;;;;:::::•>:x::........, •St'S:.Y .:..F.;:'.4ii:iii:�iiiiiiii.iii: ::% : Thisrack allows cyclists to attach their r biccl e on eita side of the rack and has been approved by the Northgate Revitilization Board. Northgate Design Guidelines 11 Where bicycle parking is not clearly visible, appropriate signage is encouraged. • A directional sign indicating where bicycle parking can be found is encouraged, especially where the parking is not clearly visible. • Where it is necessary to place a sign prohibiting bicycle parking, an additional sign indicating where parking can be found is encouraged. Northgate Design Guidelines 12 STREET FURNITURE Street Furniture • All street furniture should use the same color as found in the surrounding block. • Street furniture should not inhibit pedestrian flow. Newspaper Racks Newspaper racks, when clustered at a corner, can impede pedestrian activity and obscure the storefronts behind them. Their visual impact should contribute to the streetscape. • Newspaper racks painted in a muted color are encouraged. • Acceptable colors include bronze, maroon, and dark green. • Other colors may be considered by the Northgate Revitalization Board. • Newspaper racks should be an ! "^ .F„„ enclosed metal container with door 4i `T P { r access to the paper. ; :H —. . • Racks should be organized in groups • ' l ,, -14 ‘ that do not block access to cross- f,,,' -21,7 r i lI i.' .} ,., ,' walks or parking. 3 + Ti e �f j • Due to the high numbers of -0! °fit -4 C,1 xil„v,ii,ili c. dYx ' �iF � r xw ''?' , pedestrians at nighttime and the '• �'x:tr `y�� ,��, t\ �, �., �- ��' � P tendency of these pedestrians to gather fir a' err�;n-,y3 . , 1 .a. �� �l �{r,r rs� 1 e. a r y4� * 1 at intersections, newspaper racks ' .r.�:• 1.-,?''0' '. �s ; �> I''+ re f should not be located at corners or on crowded pedestrian ways. This rack allows cyclists to attach their bicycle on either side of the rack and has been approved by the Northgate Revitalization Board. Sidewalk benches Sidewalk benches should be compatible with the character of the street. • The use of seating areas should be similar to it, , ii iii ~nt4 ' those approved by the Northgate i : m 0/+1 1 Revitalization Board. "`"'; F7.. t • The Northgate Revitalization Board has ;''iI >r ' ' approved the purchase of several metal dark t,.. , ;,'-,\�'� i '2 ` ' �Illl 1,., green benches (see plots). The purchase of ,, .. ,, �VI\��1 :i�ti9 additional benches similar to this design is _ strongly encouraged and should be bronze, , , ... maroon, or dark green in color. -Itco ' , 4 t Other colors and designs may be considered ' '`''' ' ' J • by the board. This bench and trash receptacle have been approved. Northgate Design Guidelines 13 Trash Receptacles Trash Receptacles should be compatible with the character of the street. • The use of trash receptacles is encouraged. ® The pictured trash receptacle has been approved by the Northgate Revitalization Board and should be bronze, maroon, or dark green in color. • Other colors and designs may be considered by the board. it , fj; , tsFe l3t�i`t r �• 1,4'.I t�! �dr0.; + 1 } M y ��w rtarzw f x {y It. {{i � -0 � C 119 � Y t+ r� � 1._., � szduz x r S •" ' Newspaper containers, h• ; benches,trash receptacles,and • planters are all grouped together and have � u++ coordinating colors. (o� miT1111111 INC i Ittlu ITV r . = - 1 = • ttirlitUallEatal Typical placement shown at right. 11IlU�IIii[[(litilA(If(IIWI[[$ �gltlt[�[df1!Illif!�Lll(!� 10' 14 Northgate Design Guidelines STREET LIGHTS Street lights are encouraged and should be in accordance with the Subdivision Regulations where required. • The street light design has been approved by the Northgate Revitalization Board. (see photo) • Other designs may be considered by the Board. • Street lights on residential or collector streets should be no more than 14 feet in height including the globe. jyf, • Other heights may be considered by the Northgate Revitalization Board. ie_ • Street lights located on arterial streets shall be no more j rVc-'4: tiY f1,1 r than 16 feet in height including the globe. , 3 xr. • Banners (approximately 2'x6') attached to the approved "t street lights are strongly encouraged. • Additional exterior lighting, highlighting the architectural t`?4 ``f� elements of the facade are encouraged. • Additional exterior canopy lights illuminating the - 3 sidewalks and storefront window are encouraged. is design has been approved by the Northgate Revitalization Board. Northgate Design Guidelines 15 STREETSCAPING and LANDSCAPING • The development of outdoor patios, walkways, seating areas, and courtyards in the rear and in side alleys is encouraged. dn F , tiY 31' r ' z 7f' ti... M i els/� 4} :" T i f fnj c t'K• f :.:r��a Al • ,,,‘1 '.,,,',. "7, ‘"- rit 44'-.-‘;I •' ..' ' ''':,--.... - — -.,.. ' .-.7:5-.--'....,.:, -,'''' -4:; 1 1 ..+, -'it''' y ! ri ,�P 5 11 111-4- ,i 11-4 . or, Fr A , ^ 11 -' ref , f;'r i�, , \ ,, ' r. Iii; .-f '{ !ti t'LI t ge. . . , i �_n �,i ' . .!'1'� d mi_fr .Ati , This empty building space was turned into an open This outdoor seating area, in Northgate, provides courtyard with benches and table areas with landscaping appropriate plantings and space for customers to relax elements. outside. • Planters are encouraged and should:. -.ti, 1 J coordinate with the building or with r ,� i, I ,F k' li I {{ {, :M surrounding landscaping. ..,{t-,40.. ty,,g , (r.� ,r, ,e :,'r fr 5 T' Ip i N L I l p ; `M7 Sri . r.I S is t 1 11 a ��rL,l • .-r/�j rt ir. 1 R! S.is• r1 }.. V 4k,A 1 ''F`eQ iA' . (3A ye14 '.� These planters in downtown , 1, s',. Ft. Worth coordinate with ",1, }0 9 the building materials. 'tAi it • Landscape Requirements: A landscape plan shall be required for all proposals involving site development or redevelopment, and shall be reviewed by the NRB/PRC in accordance with the following standards: (1) Landscape/streetscape improvements may be required along at least 1/3 of the length of a property's frontage onto public streets. Doorway widths and driveways shall be excluded from frontage calculations. Live plant material must be included where feasible in each proposal. (2) Eligible landscape/streetscape improvements shall include raised planter boxes, at-grade planting beds, indoor window plantings where sidewalks are too Northgate Design Guidelines 16 narrow for outside plantings, seating benches, light features, trash receptacles, decorative railings, and other elements featured in the College Station Streetscape Plan. y 1 i ,. I ;_ 1� k II `, s yr ? . 2111!! p .i` x? t Street trees,banners,and planters are all used as part of the For a large scale development a open pedestrian area is landscaping for the area in downtown Ft.Worth. appropriate. This open space in Galveston, TX includes a human checkerboard. ,a y:. g x4 `' • �(" p I h o y E. •,.., 7 fir. 1 F•c1-�-1 _.:: ..... • 1 K{ `�- ,Jj _L`ice.... A.gym .....,. —it _.. - - _ '�� - ft4 This alley,in Downtown Ft.Worth,successfully landscapesr� ....! I L EaFprovides an attractive entrance intoa seating area. Sh .4 5111111 4111 . q� 94 --1- -1.----- ill I I 1 r , . , AV . . __ _. A M tTTH1- - if / . \ `'s'4(' . intiro \ . , -ey,-- I Sample arrangement of landscape elements. Northgate Design Guidelines 1 7 SIDEWALKS Sidwallcs allow pedestrians to travel around the area in a safe and efficient manner. Sidwallcs must be wide enough to provide adequate pedestrian flow as well as space for street furniture and other elements. Pedestrians may avoid businesses where sidewalks are to crowded or cluttered. • In all redevelopment projects sidewalks should be constructed if none currently exist along the street frontage. • If the sidewalk is placed against the curb, the width should be six feet. • If there is a six foot buffer/green space between the sidewalk and the street, the sidewalk should be a minimum of four feet in width. • Sidewalks at least eight feet in width are strongly encouraged. • All sidewalks in Northgate should be constructed with brick pavers where feasible. \� /jA•0' s ,n \� \ ri // , • 4 Sn �� � f xk mR;r,N 'g 1... }n This sidewalk is appropriate for a residential area. It provides a buffer from street traffic with appropriate landscaping. + .t 'e�`x�� ire�yror£ 3i This eight foot wide sidewalk in residential Northgate provides room for a higher volume of pedestrians.street traffic Northgate Design Guidelines 18 MAILBOXES In residential areas mailboxes should positively contribute to the streetscape. The visual impact of mail delivery areas should be minimized. • Mailboxes on individual units should be attached to the building where possible. • In apartment complexes mailboxes should be enclosed in a structure that is similar in design and materials to their respective apartment buildings. r ._-----,-- 1111111 T i ~i I �� Ir. IIIIII I I1( I! i LI IIl . f I �{�I 1 I II ILIL II1 II IilLJIIJLUL I II t°t"��1;011 Y.I,1�1,, g y� itA r Rtut,At stomtw� maw 1ry�0:)?;! P� ��,< ; tai c`K��„yn �:e63,t,� • n,°. h\14.��n���q�j 100 .$r r @.e. ,•.� R gra . a?•,. ,' 171 '17", �.! ►�,ii$16o tt„ ,•�.fie �,a.:.ltz: ,r, tipl �I d l r,,,..4,, .'i0 o„t �,, X 1!•1 tq�l ,,� ._:14,,�t _.r_w `,,,x %u,1e• ` jv,, � :�i- -i%„r Ae •it� re, I �r\0 ' ►tip► '� , >%. !1i a • � � ,� \•0 it.Ni.' $Anise �n. �� ' �I 4 y,f% Po �ll�NI©Se "Tr!rte*`y •a 4 3,T ) )igi enrusent it, ' /y , l • This mailbox area in this apartment complex is shielded by a cover that is identical to the stairways and is also screened by landscaping. Northgate Design Guidelines 19 ARCHITECTURAL CHARACTER STYLES The architectural character of the Northgate District should remain historic (circa 1940— 1950) and future development should be sensitive to the elements. • Contemporary interpretations of traditional buildings, which are similar in scale and overall character to those seen historically, are strongly encouraged. • Infill should be contextually appropriate. MASS AND SCALE A band or division between the storefront and upper facades of buildings at similar heights or a predominance of canopies or awnings extending along several facades, or the alignment of windows and window sills are all excellent ways to provide buildings with horizontal rhythm. The following standards apply to the Historic Northgate subdistrict: • New construction should conform to the overall mass and scale of the existing streetscape. • • Additions to the tops of existing buildings should not adversely affect the composition of the facade, nor should the addition be out of scale with the building. • New facades should contain both vertical and horizontal 3-D features that relate to the pedestrian or human scale. Examples of such features are railings, cornices, window mullions, and recessed entries. • Existing structures within the Historic Northgate Sub-district range from 12 feet to 30 feet in width. • In the Historic Northgate Sub-district, most buildings are between 15 and 30 feet. • The use of canopies or awnings is strongly encouraged. The following standards apply to the commercial and residential subdistricts: • Areas near the perimeter of the subdistricts should feature smaller transitional building heights in order to be more compatible with adjacent Historic Northgate Subdistrict. • Buildings exceeding two stories are strongly discouraged. • Building should be similar in height and width to surrounding structures. • New buildings should include portions that are similar in height to surrounding buildings. Northgate Design Guidelines 20 • Maintaining a visual division between street level and upper floors is encouraged. • Large projects that occupy several lots are encouraged to vary building heights, including portions that are designed at a human scale. L ,i--r:1 i--,17,'•.,i,' 11, 1,pv5r(, 'p' Iv' , .tom .i. r� ..,;',.t?", {I it { 7r ° ry St 1 .ti. i v 3fY 1)1 f. ;+ Ir '.I ` 'yam irk.'-41,4111.11:;11'1 1 ;,=,-- air + s+ 9 t t �` kr �� ��`+,�5�y�, � * 1s�y �}i 1.'is } ,t r ter. ' i 1 t , [ is. —•-t a yzt 1 t)1 + ...,,..r 1`1 ( ' 1 #''Ferry Y fi i kd' yr rx { ..r i • tt5{ > r -4'!..`', 1 ff i t r >1 I0 1 i s,'Y,,„‘,,,!,,:,.,,I i 1>r i f '� 7 i }d1i Fr' .(:' ,.i ,: 7Stt ..`111'4,:7t. SN,},.,.:, .�...�•.i{,,. '.r..xbsh';" st.;. These buildings,which are wide,divide up the structures with The new building at the back,with the tower,uses similar recessed entries and columnsmaterials as the historic building at the front,while using a more modern design. nn Snii .Iimini i inline n -1' ... , - — - - . ' Sample mass/scale proportions J 00 �1�1M,11 �— -- _ i - P P P • •r,• Ail i , wEra.js� .a ._, 4s that meet guidelines. COLOR The color of buildings, window trim and doors is a personal decision to be made by the building owner or merchant. The following procedures should be used in evaluating ' which colors will most suit the building. Use colors to create a coordinated color scheme for the building. • Consider the building color in the context of the entire block or area. The color of the building can affect the overall character of the street. Northgate Design Guidelines 21 • The amount of sunlight can change the hue of the paint color. Colors on south and west facades appear warmer than if placed on north or east facades. Reserve the use of bright colors for accents only. • The more intense hues of a color or the use of more than one vivid color are not encouraged. • White is a bright color that does not blend in readily with most downtown environments. Paint color should be used to tie together all building elements, including the cornice, upper facade,windows, storefront, and doors. • In general, the larger and simpler the building, the more subtle the color. Small buildings or those with elaborate detailing can often use a larger number and more intense colors. • Building trim colors should not dominate the building. • In most cases, no more than three complementary colors should be used. • Paint colors should relate to natural material colors found on the building, such as brick, stone, or tile. • Contrasting colors which accent architectural details and entrances are encouraged. BUILDING ELEMENTS Materials should appear similar to those used throughout the district. • Masonry materials are preferred, primarily stone and brick. • Other materials may be considered by the board, but they should appear similar in character to those used in the district. Roof forms should be similar to those found throughout the district. (See Appendix C) • Flat roofs should be concealed by a parapet. • Sloped roofs are acceptable. • Mansard roofs are discouraged. Window and door frames should be painted or finished with appropriate color. Bronze metal is acceptable. Artistic murals are recommended and encouraged. Porches, balconies and courtyards, where space allows, are encouraged. Northgate Design Guidelines 22 SITE DESIGN BUILDING ORIENTATION Buildings should retain orientation to the street. • Orient a new building parallel to its lot lines, in a manner similar to those found in the Historic Northgate Sub-district. • Orient the primary facade toward the street. At corner sites, a secondary facade should be used to face the cross street. • Where the rear of the building abuts a street, this side should maintain a facade and have rear access where possible. • Maintain the alley as an open space. • Entrances on multiple sides of a building are encouraged where there is public right of way or public pedestrian walkways. Zero lot lines are encouraged in the Historic and Commercial Subdistricts. • Maintaining the alignment of facades along the sidewalk edge is encouraged. • When considering courtyards, minimize the amount of frontage on the street. PARKING SCREENING Off-street parking should be screened from the public right of way to minimize its visual impacts. (See Appendix D) • Screen the edges of parking lots with a three foot high landscaping screen. • Locate parking in the rear of the building where possible. • Landscaping the interior of parking lots is encouraged. • Dumpsters shall be kept in the rear of the building and shall be screened with devices made of masonry or wood with surrounding landscaping. Where feasible, consolidation of dumpsters may be required by the NRB/PRC. SERVICE AREAS Minimize the visual impact of trash storage areas from public right of way and public pedestrian walkways. • Dumpsters, grease recycling containers and recycling receptacles should be screened with masonry or wood and with surrounding landscaping. Where feasible, Northgate Design Guidelines 23 consolidation of dumpsters may be required by the Northgate Revitalization Board and/or Project Review Committee. ® Where wood is used it should be coated with a water sealant. ® Service areas should be located away from major pedestrian routes. ® Consolidation of trash storage and service areas is encouraged. • In order to accommodate dumpster access, screens should be at least twelve feet in length, twelve feet in width, and eight feet in height. ® Where there is consolidation of two dumpster or service areas an additional ten feet in width, for a total of twenty two feet in width, should be provided. Minimize the visual impact of loading docks, transformers, air conditioning units, utility meters and other mechanical elements. • Loading docks should be screened or gated from public right of way and public pedestrian wallcways. ® Transformers, air conditioners and other mechanical elements should be screened when visible from public right of way or public pedestrian wallcways. nrr Yz nr df �*#� [ Y r a rf 1J► r1 oT r C J "fit^'"' i.1i• � � I 1117 I {I .' 111111111 irI: II. II�, 41 j FiNk} k o 1 .'`i 1 R§ k if1k sta =t r .., - `•i r-._ 7r a'�f h This dumpster screening needs additional landscaping to meet This dumpster screening meets the ordinance requirements. the ordinance requirements. lr rid ��iLi7Ar 1Nul�2raleq t tt 41.ue<x 41i A 1i This receptacle area is consolidated and screened, but This dumpster is the recommended height and length for the accessible from a service driveconsolidation of receptacle areas. Northgate Design Guidelines 24 PPOTEK771/ Af.57711.. n'575 AT M.ar-WrIc ("X ',Yr). pparecTiYE mE7A-1- PosTs AT EA. • 4.-"Goiv4xE7e se/XFAcE ceptNef4 (4'x*4.',/r) 1-.4r,r,c. TP PPA/A/. G#caverE stherAce 'L4"ED To DM/N. 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Sample"side"dumpster screening treatments that meet the ordinance requirements. 25 North gate Design Guidelines • The use of parapet walls and other facade elements to screen mechanical roof equipment is encouraged. ��1 *mall I IIIIE 4 This parapet wall blocks the pedestrian's view of the mechanical roof equipment. DRIVE-THRU • Drive-thru should be a permanent structure, with a minimum size of 2500 square feet. • Rear Access to drive-thru window is preferred. • Drive-thru should not impede pedestrian walkways. (( 1 ( , • -- __: i.---1: .... ,._ . , , .,. .,.F-F---1, - , , .._ _ .. . , .. ,<), ._ I ,_, . , ir IIV;1....-Agi h..,Al.,,,,,,,,,,.1 I tit- 1110° 1 ^� f-� mlw.-. 1 J 1 _ I I I {. l Northgate Design Guidelines 26 ACCESSIBILITY The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that places of public accommodation be accessible to all users. These guidelines should not prevent or inhibit compliance with accessibility laws. • All new construction should comply with ADA as specified by the City's building code. • Owners of historic properties also should comply to the fullest extent possible, while also preserving the integrity of the building. • Existing construction should be brought into conformance with ADA standards in a reasonable time frame. CURB AND GUTTER Curb and gutter will be provided in accordance with Section 9 of the Zoning Ordinance. Northgate Design Guidelines 27 GLOSSARY Adaptive Reuse - The process of converting a building to a use other than that for which it was designed, e.g., changing a factory into housing. Such a conversion is accomplished with varying alterations to the building. Art Deco - A style of decorative arts and architecture popular in the 1920's and 1930's. Notable for its use of geometricized classical forms, in colorful glazed terra cotta, black glass, bronze or natural aluminum. Attached Sign - A sign attached to or applied on and totally supported by a part of a building. Awning- Any structure made of cloth, metal or other material attached to a building when the same is so erected as to permit its being raised or retracted to a position against the building when not in use. Balcony - A platform projecting from the upper story, enclosed by a railing or balustrade, with an entrance from the building and supported by brackets, columns or cantilevered out. Banner- A piece of fabric used for decoration or for identification. Bracket - A supporting member for a projecting element or shelf, sometimes in the shape of an inverted L and sometimes as a solid piece or a triangular truss. Canopy - A roofed structure constructed of metal, wood or other material placed so as to extend outward from a building providing a protective shield for doors, windows and other openings supports extended to the ground directly under the canopy or canilevered from the building. Commercial Northgate Subdistrict (NG-2) - This zoning district contains many of the commercial structures in Northgate. This district is depicted on the Northgate Zoning Map. Context - The surrounding environment of a building or site, including other structures, site features, landscape and streets. Design Review - The local process of determining whether new construction or proposed changes to buildings in the Northgate District meet the intent of the Northgate Zoning Ordinance and the standards of appropriateness established by the Northgate Revitalization Board. Deterioration - The process of making a structure's condition worse, by lack of maintenance, normal wear and tear, and/or exposure to weather. 28 Northgate Design Guidelines Easement - A partial interest in real property, through donation or purchase, recorded in the deed. Elevation - A drawing showing the vertical elements of a building or site. Historic Northgate Subdistrict (NG-1) - This zoning district contains some of the oldest structures in Northgate, several of which are eligible for the National Register for Historic Places. This district is depicted on the Northgate Zoning Map. Infill - Descriptive of buildings that have been designed and built to replace missing structures or otherwise fill gaps in the streetscape. Infilling can mean replacing a store destroyed by fire, for example. Mass - The physical volume or bulk of a building, its arrangement and organization. Mixed Use - A term used to signify an authorized variety of uses in a given area, as opposed to the single use called for in most zoned areas. National Register of Historic Places - A listing of sites, buildings, objects, districts and structures of potential interest which may carry some sort of legal protection when listed. Northgate Revitalization Board - A City Council Appointed citizen committee charged with overseeing the revitalization of Northgate as well as performing a design review function. Pitch - The angle of slope of a roof, i.e., 30 degree pitched roof, a low-pitched roof, a high-pitched roof, and so forth. Typically expressed as a ratio of units of vertical distance to 12 units of horizontal distance, i.e., 8/12. Plan - A drawing representing a downward view of a building or site or more specifically, a horizontal section showing arrangement of walls, partitions, rooms, doors, windows, trees, parking areas, or other elements. Pointing - The outer, and visible, finish of the mortar between the bricks or stones of a masonry wall. Porch - A covered entrance to a building; may be open or partly enclosed. Portico - A porch or covered walk consisting of a roof supported by columns. Preservation - The act or process of applying measures to sustain the existing fon', integrity, and materials of a building or structure, and the existing form and vegetative cover of a site. It may include initial stabilization work, where necessary, as well as ongoing maintenance of the historic building materials. 29 Northgate Design Guidelines Proportion - As an expression of artistic endeavor, the relation between parts in relevance to the whole (height to width, for example), which helps create visual order in architecture. Public Art - Reconstruction - The act or process of reproducing by new construction the exact form and detail of a vanished building, structure, or object or a part thereof, as it appeared at a specific period of time. Rehabilitation - The act or process of returning a property to a state of utility through repair or alteration which makes possible an efficient contemporary use while preserving those portions or features of the property which are significant to its historical, architectural, and cultural values. Renovation - Questionable modernization of a historic building in which inappropriate alterations are made and important features and details eliminated. Residential Northgate Subdistrict (NG-3) - This zoning district contains the majority of the residential structures in Northgate. This district is depicted on the Northgate Zoning Map. Restoration - The act or process of accurately recovering the form and details of a property and its setting as it appeared at a particular period of time by means of the removal of later work or by the replacement of missing earlier work. Rhythm - The sense of movement created by the regular recurrence of elements, as in the spacing of doors and windows, across the facade of a building. Roof types (see appendix?for illustration of types): Flat, shed, hip, gable, mansard, and gambrel Scale - Those qualities in architecture and landscape which relate to human size, enhancing the importance of the human individual rather than diminishing the individual. Sense of Place - The sum total of those parts which give a particular site, area, or neighborhood a distinctive character unique to its locality. Sign - means any written or graphic representation, decoration, form, emblem, trademark, flag, banner, or other feature or device of similar character which is used for the communication of commercial information, or communication of ideas or subjects of 30 Northgate Design Guidelines political significance, and which: A. Is a structure or any part thereof, including the roof or wall of a building, or a free standing wall or fence; B. Is written, printed, projected, painted, constructed or otherwise placed or displayed upon or designed into a building, board, plate, canopy, awning or vehicle, or upon any material, object or device whatsoever; and C. By reason of its form, color, wording, symbol design, illumination or motion attracts or is designed to attract attention to the subject thereof, or is used as a means of identification, advertisement or announcement. D. A sign shall be considered to be a single display surface, a double-faced display surface, or display device containing elements clearly organized, related and composed to form a unit. Where matter is displayed in a random manner without organized relationship of elements or where there is reasonable doubt about the relationship of elements, each element shall be considered to be a single sign; provided, however, that the display of merchandise through glass windows in any zone where such merchandise may be sold in the ordinary course of business shall not constitute a sign or signs. Stabilization - The act or process of applying measures designed to reestablish a weather- resistant enclosure and structural stability while maintaining the essential form as it exists at present. Street Furniture - A term for elements of the streetscape other than buildings, such as light fixtures, benches, and trash receptacles. Streetscape - A view or vista of a specific street, the distinguishing characteristics of which are created by the width of the street and sidewalks, their paving materials and color, the design of street furniture, the potential use of plant materials such as trees and shrubs, and the setback, mass, proportion, and scale of those buildings which enclose the street. Store Front - The street level facade of a commercial building, usually having display windows. Style - The manner in which ornament and structure are combined to create the distinctive character of artistic architectural endeavor expressive of an era or period in time. Window Sign - A sign installed on, inside, or behind a window and intended to be viewed from the outside. 31 Northgate Design Guidelines RESOURCES Developing Downtown Design Guidelines, Janice Pregliasco, A.I.A. California Main Street Program, 1988. Dictionary of Architecture and Construction, Cyril M. Harris. McGraw Hill Publishing, 1975. Fundamentals of Urban Design, Hedman, Richard and Andrew Jaszewski. American Planning Association, 1984. Keeping Time, William J. Murtagh. Sterling Publishing, 1990. Signs For Main Street. Mainstreet Guidelines. National Trust for Historic Preservation, 1987. Designing the Future to Honor the Past. Design Guidelines for Cape Cod, Cape Cod Commission and Community Vision, Inc., 1994. Innovative Tools for Historic Preservation, Marya Morris. Planning Advisory Service Report No. 438, September 1992. Design Review, Mark L. Hinshaw. Planning Advisory Service Report No. 454, February 1995. College Station Texas 1938/1988, Deborah Lynn Balliew. Intaglio Press, 1987. Design Guidelines Bryan, Texas, City of Bryan, October 1995. Northgate Redevelopment Plan, City of College Station, Texas. January 1996. Union Station District Master Plan, City of Tacoma, Washington. May 1989. Northgate Design Guidelines 32 APPENDIX A - NORTHGATE ZONING DISTRICT Northgate Design Guidelines NORTHGATE ZONING DISTRICTS e -----\ COLLEGE AV I \ --'--,\ c., • MILAM AV eillfr 'II • ,•\ 6 !. 1 1 1 3 - cn- •ii-I— I \\ \C' i V \ I\1' ci) lim \ I\ IIIIII R ,NC) %0 DOGWOOD ST i 1 C < •N`..• 14 0 \\ 04, -- c;,, -—I" :)._. Aot. itt__....-------\'- til- - / / Ce. (S.0 _ C, -- C, k; \- ,L, t 0 ri') l'-1' —— V I / ..V ri... ... rl —\C'— -—-\i, -' 111). 0 \ 5 II NAGLE I I 11 V \N,4 ,;1)12,\t•t k)I,‘,, . , \ t.,___p",vii-,; --- ' x II fE, NEY ST c_) : ;f) ----- C'J i I 1 . .! vi - 1-14,-;•:(-•? 1 u., II r ,.,,,‘.....c.„.i., ._.1\ c„ <, t,, .,,i,,,., . . k, (., 1 , ,I. .. 1 , 1 . , 1 TAUBER ST 1 \C1 1: 1 I • 1 'I ' 11\'1' I',1,,,,,,, tc \CI)\\I\'11\:13,\1't\'''J\Co •, 411. —I -,-I?. rn„ 1 ,, , • • ,,. 11 1, 1 1-A 111,,,, ,,--L,\ ,.., .. % ',,'6, , , • \ \ • _J I COLLEGE MAIN /Pr .6. (- '1 - •l' t,t,-- 0 •I z 0°, , .\', Ib trl,.---i7,, i„1,,,,.1,1 p4i,:,,,,'.1.• ; -I- ';'i, 'Y -- I;\ .C).._. __ '\ tea.::.);.'. -1'''''' % ..,?,- ,-, S.__'.I- <I) ,.s3 rl•I'\ 'IV\• I • I.',I;-:-..,..1-uo \ SECOND LLi •‘) _3__ . _ 1, ( I ., 0 \ BOYETT ST lit 5 6 I, .---- \.ft •••%... 1„ ,,,, , .",,,o. , ,,, \ Ic '3 1 ji 1 )1 111-111111111-11-iii I .) '' ')I 1' \ 9 N\ '!!!'z) • ! '''' --1-----'' !'l'! --- WELLBORN RD N ......,...„............... smill ""• mcit/....-. Mop produced by Day. Serv. - 6/96 filename: NO_Zono.dwg APPENDIX B - BIKE LOOP PLAN Northgate Design Guidelines NORTHGATE BIKE ROUTES/LANES i \ 1 ___.) COLLEGE AV r,;. CULPEPPER DR / iii S MILAM AV \., r cn DOGWOOD ST E (: o, do yiki., yG !tib .:„.::. i NAGLE ST ---i . 1,...,, ar: \ :':',, .1' 2 U U o STASNEY ST (1II }ceb, w --I II I= TAUBER ST r \.... COLLEGE MAIN _______ s _ O O y w Q W o N • U J Y• Lu SECOND ST ? T OJ I [ 1 U T U i II I 1�/ BOYLII ST 1 w 1 U 7 ce J'n > FIS il Iw 5 o +-F Legend: WELLBORN RD N c s _ MN BIKE ROUTE rg; E BIKE LANE 1 Map Produced by Dev. Serv. — 6/96 filename: NG1one.dwg '1 APPENDIX C - ROOF TYPES Northgate Design Guidelines ROOF TYPES • FLAT SHED Ridge Una Thik Eave /\ \ Line HIP Deck GABLE Line *0 MANSARD GAMBREL Zoning Ordinance APPENDIX D - PARKING SCREENING Northgate Design Guidelines Low PLANTIAlq Ift- 1:- . ' `., • lr Li-); L e r/vcl.r nzuve .w M(1j. ' �r�r': • EeN flM'7 To K tis i roi¢P1 /e O HG ���r � •..i r1 I' o •. , � rbc-SEs o. I rAfFfvNc, KNE.* ' - -n556-7- . • z1-4 7? 7- z14 -& • c d ' d "IAA �N` r • • •i,• �-Atie/f=PD IfectE i / :4f' //d/X F / i 7-rr-s• 3-1,10.1111r0. ''''"' , 4 .. n II w,w low/NAG, oft PACIGE yr, ••( INC l' =k 1 1 . . ::: - 4ft:fiiiifi..'' 4iiii/LO MArai/e010-11 Iii 1, .arr: I Areenium-s7riz 1 / /1 f7Vrif4N6r 2--G V � �r T j Low NW- 014 0) ,[166' '''''''N''''V\., s PENc-& lig N .rari ems► Parking Screen Zoning Ordinance �M ,:., . I I ) •. r I• I I _ ` •.; .9\I ." 1_0 / �••:-:w��r.i.:i�ire.... ..; • ri • I I ,. • 't4 Aln •• I. • I . I • I \ 4 H Q" • •I I p/Y�1/1 t"Elz- fimor,c\ •S7 T Cr 4t. e ` q �S �, Parting Screen