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Lift Station Wet WellMr. Chris Rhodes Oldham Goodwin Group, LLC 2800 South Texas Avenue, Suite 401 Bryan, Texas 77802 January 21, 2015 GESSNER E GIN E RI GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING STUDY GESSNER ENGINEERING Lift Station Wet Well Creek Meadows College Station, Texas Gessner Engineering Job No.: 14-0699 CIVIL STRUCTURAL GEOTECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING January 21, 2015 Mr. Chris Rhodes Oldham Goodwin Group, LLC 2800 South Texas Avenue, Suite 401 Bryan, Texas nB02 Re: Geotechnical Engineering Study Lift Stati on Wet Well Creek Meadows College Station, Texas Gessner Engineering Job No.: 14-0699 Dear Mr. Chris Rhodes: e GESSNER ENGINEERING This report conveys our geotechnical engineering study conducted for the proposed Lift Station Wet Well located in College Station, Texas. We trust that this report is responsive to your project needs. Please contact us if you have any questions or if we can be of further assistance. We are excited to work with you on this phase of the project, and look forward to the opportunity to provide additional geotechnical engineering services, structural services, civil engineering services and construction materials testing services as the project progresses. Sincerely, GESSNER ENGINEERING, LLC F-7451 Kristina M. Farris. E.1.T. Raquel Gonzales. P.E. Copies Submitted: Mr. Chris Rhodes COLLEGE STATION • BRENHAM • FORTWORTH • SAN A"ITONIO CIVIL STRUCTURAL GEOTECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING CONTENTS 4 Introduction Project Description and scope of services 5 Site Investigation Procedures 7 Laboratory Testing 9 Site Conditions Site geology, surface and subsurface conditions. grou ldwater 12 Engineering Recommendations Mat foundation. stiffened slab-on-grade foundation system, deep foundations, ear 'lvvork drainage o•her ;ssues & construct o i materials testing 18 General Comments and Limitations 19 Appendix Summary, project layout, bori'lg 'og symbols a·1d terms, ge'.)log1cal 1c>rris GESSNER ENGINEERING 3 CIVIL STRUCTURAL GEOTECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING Introduction This report presents the results of our geotechnical engineering study for the proposed Lift Station Wet Well, located in College Station, Texas. Gessner Engineering was authorized to provide the subsurface investigation and report for this project by Mr. Chris Rhodes on November 5, 2014. Project Description The project consists of the proposed construction of a lift station wet well at the site located at Creek Meadows in Brazos County, Texas. Scope of Services The Texas Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers defines an engineered foundation as one that includes a geotechnical engineering investigation. To act as this first phase of an engineered foundation, our scope of work for this project consisted of: 1. Drilling 1 test bore hole at the selected location within the project site to evaluate the subsurface arrangement of strata and groundwater conditions. 2. Performing geotechnical laboratory tests on recovered samples to evaluate the physical and engineering properties of the strata observed. 3. Engineering analysis to develop design and construction recommendations with respect to: • Site, subgrade, and fill preparation; and • Foundation design and construction . Project Location CIVIL STRUCTURAL GEOTECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING I SITE INVESTIGATION PROCEDURES Bore Holes: 1 Bore Hole Depth: 30 feet Subsurface conditions were evaluated by drilling 1 test bore hole on December 16, 2014 to a depth of approximately 30 feet, below the existing ground surface (at the time of our field activities) within the limits of the proposed lift station wet well. The bore hole was drilled using standard drilling equipment. The log of bore hole, presenting the subsurface soil descriptions, type of sampling used, laboratory results and additional field data, is presented in the Appendix. The Symbol Key Sheet, which defines the terms and descriptive symbols used on the log, is also provided in the Appendix. Soil samples were generally recovered using thin-walled, open-tube samplers (Shelby tubes). This type of sampling produces samples with minimal disturbance, which is important to obtain accurate laboratory results. Samples were taken continuously for the first ten feet in two foot increments. Below ten feet, samples were taken at five foot intervals to the termination of the bore hole. Pocket penetrometer tests were performed on samples of cohesive soils in the field to serve as a general measure of consistency and to give a relative measure of the strength of the sample. Samples of soil for which a good quality thin- walled tube sample could not be recovered were obtained by means of the Standard Penetration Test (SPT). This test consists of measuring the number of blows required for a 140-pound hammer free falling 30 inches to drive a standard split-spoon sampler 12 inches into the subsurface material after being seated six inches. This blow count or SPT "N" value is used to evaluate the engineering properties of the stratum. Correlations between the unconfined compressive strength and the standard penetration number for the in situ soils have been developed to estimate the bearing capacity of the soils. All samples were removed from samplers in the field, visually classified, and appropriately sealed in sample containers to preserve their in situ moisture contents. The term consistency refers to the degree of adhesion between the soil particles and to the resistance offered against forces that tend to deform or rupture the soil aggregate. The consistency of clays and other cohesive soils is usually described as very soft, soft, firm, stiff, very stiff, and hard. The correlation between the pocket penetrometer results and these consistency terms are provided on the Figure, "Symbols and Terms used on Boring Logs" in the Appendix. Additional consistency terms used on cohesive soils are plastic, lean and fat. The more closely a soil approaches the characteristics of a clay soil, the greater the variety of states of consistency in which it may be found. A plastic soil changes physical properties depending upon the moisture content of the soil. The degree of plasticity is sometimes expressed by the terms fat and lean. Lean clay is only slightly plastic; fat clay has a high plasticity. Pocket Penetrometer GESSNER ENGINEERING 5 CIVIL STRUCTURAL GEOTECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING LABORATORY TESTING Samples obtained during the field program were visually classified in the laboratory by a geotechnical engineer or technician. A testing program was conducted on selected samples in accordance with the ASTM Standard Test Procedures, as directed by the geotechnical engineer, to aid in classification and evaluation of engineering properties required for analysis. The testing program for this project included sieve analyses, moisture contents, Atterberg limits, unit weights, unconfined compressive strengths, and bar linear shrinkage tests. The sieve analyses were performed by passing the sample through a series of sieves to classify the soil based on their particle size. This allows a determination of the type of soils, distribution of the particle sizes and the interaction between the particles. The sieve analysis procedure is outlined in ASTM C136. Sieves used for this test include a series of screens of various sizes to determine the amount of various particle sizes in a sample. Sieves are numbered with the highest numbers representing the finest screens. The moisture content tests were performed in accordance with ASTM 02216 by placing a sample into an oven with a constant temperature and comparing the mass before oven drying to the mass after oven drying. Changes in the moisture content have a significant effect on the behavior of plastic soils. Variations in the moisture content from the state observed during investigation can result in soil shrinkage or swell. If the moisture content of the soil increases after construction, for example, the soil can induce uplift forces on the structure it is supporting. The structure of clay consists of a random arrangement of flat plates. Edges of the particles are positively charged, and the face is negatively charged. The negative charges on the face of the clays bond with positive GESSNER ENGINEERING water ions in the soil, causing expansion of the soils. This water may be released with the application of pressure from load, evaporation, or suction from gravity or vegetation. The specific chemical makeup of the various clays causes them to have a stronger or weaker ability to bond with water. In simple terms, the clay molecules can be represented as a randomly scattered stack of playing cards. With the addition of wate r, it is similar to attaching ping pong balls to the face of the cards. Stacking these cards would result in a large volumetric change similar to what occurs in clay soils. In order to relate moisture content and soil consistency, Atterberg limit tests were performed on the samples in accordance with ASTM 04318. The Atterberg limit test is comprised of two separate tests: plastic limit and liquid limit. The plastic limit test determines the moisture content of the soil in its dry ASTM Testing Standards: Technical standards for a wide range of materials, products, systems, and services laid out by the American Society for Testing and Materials, an international standards organization. state wh ile the liquid limit test determines the moisture content as the soil nears a liquid state. The plastic limit is described as the water content of the soil where it transitions between brittle and plastic behavior. This point is determined by rolling the samples in threads 1/8 inch (3 mm) in diameter to the point at which they begin to crack and/or crumble. In contrast, the liquid limit describes the water content of the soil where it transitions between plastic and liquid behavior. In conducting this test, the sample is placed in the metal cup portion of a liquid limit device. A standard grooving tool is used to create a gap in the center of the sample 0.53 inches (13.5 mm) in width. The cup is then dropped repeatedly onto the hard rubber base. The liquid limit is the moisture content at which the groove closes after 25 6 CIVIL STRUCTURAL GEOTECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING blows. The plasticity index is the difference between the two and provides a description of the moisture states a soil can experience. The plasticity index is an indicator of the potential for expansion or contraction of the soil. Uquid Umit Device For select samples of clayey soils, bar linear shrinkage testing was done to provide an additional measure of the expansive potential of the soil. Testing was done in accordance with TEX-107-E, in which the soil is placed in a sample mold at a moisture content slightly above the liquid limit, oven dried overnight, and the dry length measured. The difference between the dry and wet lengths is representative of the potential linear shrinkage of that soil strata. Unit weights were determined by the ratio of the weight to given volume of a sample in accordance with ASTM 07263. Dry density measurements are useful to determine the degree of soil compaction, void ratio and porosity. GESSNER ENGINEERING The most direct qualitative measure of consistency is the load per unit area at which unconfined samples of the soil fail in a simple compression test. This quantity is the unconfined compressive strength of the soil and can be used to estimate the shear strength of cohesive soils. Unconfined compressions tests indicate the strength of soil under unconfined conditions. Tests were performed in accordance with ASTM 02166 by placing a cylindrical soil sample with no confinement and applying a compressive load until it fails . The load is applied fairly rapidly thus producing undrained conditions. In an undrained condition the pore water does not move through the sample quickly and excess pore pressures develop. Generally, structures are constructed and loads imposed on the soil more quickly than the rate of drainage of the soils. Therefore, the undrained condition is the more applicable condition for testing. Results of the laboratory tests are presented on the Log of Bore Hole in the Appendix and are discussed in the following sections. 7 CIVIL STRUCTURAL GEOTECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING SITE CONDITIONS Site Geology Site specific soils data is critical to design and performance at this location. On a grander scale, the major soil formations provide information with regards to the depth and magnitude of the conditions, as well as anticipated features of the soils in this area . On a more localized level, the US Department of Agriculture provides general soils data based on regional shallow soils data. This information provides typical data for the area . While it is valid as a general reference, it does not provide data accurate enough to replace site specific engineering analysis. The site is located in the Yegua Formation of the Eocene Age in the Tertiary Era as indicated on the Geologic Atlas of Texas, Austin Sheet as published by the University of Texas at Austin. The Yegua Formation is composed of sandstone, clay, and lignite. The sandstone is fine grained, subangular to subrounded, indurated to friable, calcareous, glauconitic, massive, locally cross-bedded, and contains mostly quartz and some chert. The clay is lignitic, bentonitic, sandy, silty, mostly well laminated, and is chocolate brown to reddish brown. Lentils of lignite are common, and flat ironstone concretions and spherical calcareous concretions a foot or more in diameter are common. The Yegua Formation is approximately 750 to 1,000 feet thick. According to the USDA, the site is located in the Singleton fine sandy loam formation. This soil unit is characterized by non-plastic to low plasticity fine sandy loam at the surface, high to very high plasticity clay between 9 and 17 inches, moderate to very high plasticity sandy clay between 17 and 28 inches, and bedrock between 28 and 60 inches. The Building Site Development is rated as very limited due to shrink-swell potential. G SSNER ENGINEERING Surface Conditions Based on visual observations, the area of the proposed lift station wet well is located on a gentle slope with an elevation difference of approximately 2 feet across the site. Ground cover for the proposed site consists of grass and weeds. Subsurface Conditions The subsurface arrangement of strata at the site was evaluated from our field and laboratory programs. In general, the soil stratigraphy from the surface to 28 feet indicated clayey sand followed by fat clay from 28 feet to the termination of the bore hole at approximately 30 feet below existing grade. These soils generally exhibit a low to very high potential for volumetric change due to moisture variations, as indicated by the measured plasticity indices (Pl) which are presented in Table 1. The table (Table 1) also contains the in situ moisture contents that correspond to the plastic limits found in the bore hole. These moisture contents indicate that the soils were dry on the surface and wet below the surface at the time of sampling. Moisture contents are compared to plastic limits to evaluate the conditions within the plastic state for the particular soil, as opposed to absolute values of mo isture content. During the procurement of subsurface samples, pocket penetrometer tests were performed upon each undisturbed soil sample. Pocket penetrometers provide an estimate of soil strength by pressing a spring loaded piston a specified depth into the soil sample. In addition, unconfined compression tests were performed on selected samples in the laboratory to supplement the field results. The shear strength based on unconfined compressive tests and correlated from the pocket penetrometer tests are included in 8 CIVIL STRUCTURAL GEOTECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING Table 1 below. Another good indicator of strength is the friction angle, which can be correlated from the SPT test in the field. These values are also included in Table 1 below. The clayey sand found from 2 to 4 feet in Bore Hole 1 was tested for shrinkage through a bar linear shrinkage test. The soil was found to shrink 12% in volume from its maximum volume to an oven dry state. This value indicates a moderate shrink-swell potential. Groundwater Conditions The bore hole was dry augered to its completed depth in an attempt to observe groundwater conditions. No groundwater was observed in the bore hole at the time of the drilling. We should note that groundwater at the site may occur in the form of "perched" water traveling along pervious seams or layers within the soils. The frequency of such groundwater is expected to increase during and soon after periods of wet weather. The direction of flow of subsurface moisture is unknown and many times will differ from the surface topography. Caution should be taken when constructing in wet seasons and all water accumulated during construction shall be removed prior to concrete placement. , . · · .· · · Moisture ·, . Approximate St t Pl . C . t t Shear.Strength (tsf)/. -· · Depth .· · ra a Range . R. · ~n e(~/) Friction Angle (°) . , . . . , . ange /o 0-28' 28' -30' Clayey Sand (SC) Fat Clay (CH) 16-43 44 2% Dry to 7% Wet 4% to 5% Wet Table 1: Engineering Properties of Each Soil Strata 0.15-4.83 40° 0.55-1.50 GESSNER ENGINEERING 9 CIVIL STRUCTURAL GEO TECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING ENGINEERING RECOMMENDATIONS The following recommendations are based upon the data obtained in our field and laboratory programs, information provided to Gessner Engineering by the client including scale of the project and use, and our experience with similar subsurface and site conditions and the proposed construction methods. Often the use of the facility dictates that the foundation will support closely spaced walls and brittle fin ishes. The extensive use of brittle finishes throughout typical office buildings and homes requires that the foundation be sufficiently rigid to limit deflection which would crack these finishes. By contrast, the use of some facilities requires flexibility in the foundation system. Retail centers, for instance, require frequent remodeling due to tenant changes and thus need to cut the floor slab to relocate plumbing. In addition, the scale of the project affects the geotechnical recommendations. For relatively small facilities, it is more cost effective and successful to stiffen a foundation to perform on the underlying expansive soils. Projects with large footprints can economically be constructed through extensive preparation of the subgrade soils to provide suitable conditions for a less stiff and consequently less expensive foundation. Subgrade treatment can include chemical stabilization, removal and replacement, or other methods to improve the in situ soil characteristics. Gessner Engineering makes reasonable assumptions regarding these recommendations based on client data. The cost effectiveness of the foundation system may be affected by numerous items including but not limited to: construction cost variations, the availability of fill, site topography, and presence of groundwater. Expansive soils are present on this site. This report provides recommendations to help mitigate the effects of soil shrinkage and expansion. However, even if these procedures are followed, some movement and cracking in the structure should be anticipated. The potential for material cracking and other damage such as unlevel floor slabs will increase if modifications at the site during or after construction results in excessive wetting or drying of the expansive soils. Eliminating the risk of movement and distress may not be feasible, but it may be possible to further reduce the risk of movement if significantly more expensive measures are used during construction. Gessner Engineering would be pleased to discuss other construction alternatives with you upon request. Deciding the type of foundation system is a process that should involve the owner, architect, contractor/builder, and engineer. The owner and architect should be aware of the potential risks and cost implications of the selected foundation system. The type of foundation may affect the selection of fin ishes, joint locations in walls and joint locations in masonry. Given the scale and use of the facility in the soil conditions located at this site, a mat foundation system or a stiffened slab-on-grade foundation is recommended to support the proposed structure. Mat Foundation For small areas with high distributed loads, a shallow mat foundation may be the most appropriate system. A value of 3,000 pounds per square foot (psf) may be used as the resulting allowable bearing pressure for the soils at one to three feet below ground surface with a properly prepared building pad. Based on the characteristics of the soils at this site and the planned load of the tanks, the GESSNER ENGINEERING 10 CIVIL STRUCTURAL GEOTECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING structure may be supported on grade as long as the surface material is compacted to form a properly prepared building pad . The foundation shall bear a minimum of 12 inches into compacted fill or existing material, and the final mat depth should be properly evaluated by the structural engineer. Gessner engineering understands that the client wishes to bear the foundation at a depth that allows the tank to remain mostly underground. The deep bearing capacities at different depths have been provided in the table below. To minimize movement and to reduce the possibility of cracking, it is recommended that the subgrade beneath the foundation be stabilized with lime per the "earthwork recommendations" section of this report. In addition, the walls of the structure shall conform with to the "retaining walls" section of this report. ., Allowable Bearfng Allowable Bearing.·, Depth (feet) Capacity Total Load Capacity Dead (ksf) Load (ksf) 10 4.22 2.81 15 4.22 2.81 18 11.75 7.83 20 11.75 7.83 ~ 23 3.36 2.24 -25 3.36 2.24 -29 4.22 2.81 30 2.34 1.56 Table 2: Allowable Bearing Capacity at Increasing Depths Stiffened Slab-on-grade A stiffened slab-on-grade, also known as a waffle slab or modified mat foundation, consists of a slab stiffened with beams spanning across the foundation in each direction. Stiffened slab-on- grade foundations are appropriate for foundations on expansive soils which are sensitive to deflection, but where structural elevated foundation systems are beyond the project budget. Grade beams in these foundations should extend from edge to edge across the slab. The network of grade beams is intended to create a rigid plate that moves as a unit in response to soil movement. Stiffened slab-on-grade systems can be designed as conventionally reinforced or cable post tensioned systems. Gessner Engineering has calculated the potential vertical rise (PVR) of the soils at this site using the Texas Department of Transportation Method Tex-124-E. The movement may be either heave or settlement depending on the changes in the moisture content. The PVR at this site is calculated to be approximately 2.4 inches. After the building pad is constructed as recommended in the "Earthwork" section, the PVR may be taken as approximately 2.0 inches. Due to assumptions and generalities required for the calculation of the potential vertical movement, it should only be taken as an approximation. We should note that moisture variations in the subgrade soils due to poor drainage, perched water in pervious layers, leakage of utilities, etc. could induce volumetric changes resulting in movements which are in excess of those estimated by the PVR procedure. GESSNER ENGINEERING 11 CIVIL STRUCTURAL GEOTECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING The parameters for the foundation design presented here are provided for the methods recommended by the Texas Branch of the American Society of Civil Engineers. Should the design engineer require additional parameters. please contact Gessner Engineering. Compacted subgrade Slab cast on grade (prepared fill) Earth·formed grade beams extend from edge to edge of foundation Conventionally Reinforced System Adjacent soils sloped to drain Steel reinforcement The primary role of steel reinforcement in reinforced concrete is to carry the tensile forces due to flexure of the beams. Concrete has high compressive strength, but lacks tensile strength. The conventionally reinforced stiffened slab-on-grade uses steel reinforcement in the grade beams to create the necessary stiffness in the foundation. Increasing the grade beam depth and size of reinforcement, and decreasing the beam spacing provide additional stiffness for more expansive soils. Presented below are the design parameters for the Building Research Advisory Board (B.R.A.B.) design method and the Wire Reinforcement Institute (W.R.I.) design method based upon the subsurface conditions observed at this project location. These methods are essentially empirical design techniques and the parameters provided are based on our interpretation of the project soil borings and criteria published in the B.R.A.B. design manual and the W.R.I. design manual. Based on the existing soil, the effective plasticity index is calculated at 32 which indicates a moderate expansion potential. After the building pad has been placed in accordance with the foundation portion of the "earthwork" section of this report, the design effective plasticity index is 29. A value of 3,000 pounds per square foot (psf) may be used as the resulting allowable bearing pressure for the soils at one to three feet below ground surface with a properly prepared building pad. Other measures recommended to reduce moisture infiltration into the subgrade are presented later in this subsection and in the "Drainage" subsection. The effective design parameters after the recommended earthwork is performed are presented in the table below. GESSNER ENGINEERING 12 CIVIL STRUCTURAL GEOTECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING Design Effective Plasticity Index 29 Allowable Bearin CaP-aci~ (P-sf> __ 3....:..,o_o_o __________ ___, Climatic Rating 22 Soil Support Index (SSI) 0.89 Table 3: B.R.A.B. or W.R./. Design Parameters We recommend that grade beams extend at least 12 inches below final grade into properly compacted earth. This recommendation is to reduce surface water migration below the foundation elements and to develop proper bearing of the grade beams. According to section 1805 of the International Building Code, the foundation is required to bear 12 inches below the adjacent soil. The grade beam width and depth should be properly evaluated by the structural engineer. Grade beams may be thickened and widened at column locations to serve as spread footings to support concentrated loads. The amount of total and differential settlement of the proposed site is anticipated to be minimal if the design requirements are precisely followed as stated in this report. Calculated bearing capacities for this site should be sufficient to provide this performance. For a stiffened slab-on- grade foundation. we highly recommend that measures be taken whenever practical to increase the tolerance of the structure to post-construction foundation movements. An example of such measures would be to provide frequent control joints for masonry/brick/stucco veneer exterio rs. if any, to control cracking across such walls and concentrate movement along the joints. Care should be taken in all foundation systems to provide adequate drainage around the structure and prevent ponding of runoff adjacent to the foundation. Reference the "drainage" section for additional resources. In addition, systems that extend from the building into the shallow soils such as plumbing should be designed to accommodate the movement of the shallow soils. Subgrade for stiffened slab-on-grade foundation system shall be prepared in accordance with the foundation portion of the soil preparation section of this report. Site Retaining Walls The walls of the wet well can be designed as a retaining wall for a basement. Reta ining walls for basements shall be designed as internally braced walls in accordance with Peck's empi rical method. Braced walls should be designed as a rigid wall that will not move enough to activate active or passive earth pressures. Instead. earth pressures shall be applied as shown in the following figure and equation. GESSNER ENGINEERING 13 CIVIL STRUCTURAL GEOTECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MA TE RIALS TESTING Where: H/4 <---------<' H H/2 ___________,,--+ H/4 ~p Figure 1: Applied Lateral Pressure p = 0.3/fl P=applied lateral pressure, in pounds per square foot H =retained wall height, in feet y =soil unit weight, in pounds per cubic foot The pressure on the wall will greatly increase if water is allowed to collect adjacent to the wall; thus, a drain system shall be installed to prevent pore pressures from building up within the backfill soils. Earthwork Construction areas should be stripped of all vegetation, loose topsoil, surficial concrete, etc. Roots of trees to be removed within construction areas should be excavated and removed from the construction area. During earthwork. best practices shall be applied to limit erosion and pollution by sedimentation. At all times. the contractor shall work to maintain natural drainage and prevent the accumulation of runoff. To achieve the required moisture content, the following recommendations are included as an aid to contractors. Where subgrade or layer of soil material requires moisture before compaction, uniformly apply water to surface of subgrade. Remove and replace, or scarify and air dry soil material that is too wet to permit compaction to specified density. Soil material that has been removed because it is too wet to achieve compaction may be stockpiled or spread and allowed to dry. Assist drying by discing, harrowing or pulverizing until moisture content is reduced to a satisfactory value. Alternate methods to achieve the end result of specified moisture content and compaction may also be used. Four different methods may be utilized to successfully compact the soil. They include the processes of static weight, kneading action, impact, or vibration. The soil must be compacted using a compactor in accordance with the ASTM standards. A compactor is required to compact the soil to such a large degree. Track equipment such as bulldozers apply pressure across a large GESSNER ENGINEERING 14 CIVIL STRUC'T\JRAL GEOTECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING surface area and are therefore limited in their capabilities compared to a compactor. If the select fill is not compacted properly, the fill material and structures constructed on it are subject to significant settlement. Foundation Earthwork For stiffened slab-on-grade at this site, it is recommended that a minimum of 1 foot of existing material be removed and 2 feet of select fill be compacted in place to form a level building pad. The building pad shall extend a minimum of five feet from the edge of the site of the footprint in all directions. Select fill shall slope away at an angle that allows for proper drainage. Refer to the Drainage section of the report for more details. Beneath a jointed slab, the 12" of clayey sand at the bottom of the Earthwork: Stiffened Slab-on-grade • Remove 1' of existing material • Replace with 2' of compacted select fill • Lime stabilized bottom 12" excavation shall be lime stabilized with 5% lime by weight prior to the placement of compacted select fill. Lime treatment shall be accomplished such that a uniform subgrade mix is obtained. The treated subgrade should be compacted to a minimum of 95 percent of the maximum density as determined by the moisture/density relation (ASTM D698) at +1 to +3 percent above optimum moisture content. Lime stabilization is not required for stiffened slabs on grade. Select fill to be utilized beneath the stiffened slab-on-grade limits should consist of a low plasticity clayey soil with a plasticity index between five and 20, a maximum gravel content (percentage retained on No. 4 sieve) of 40 percent, and rocks no larger than two inches in their largest dimension; or a crushed limestone base material meeting the requirements of the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) 2004 Standard Specifications Item 247, Type A, Grade 4. Alternatively, a low-plasticity granular fill material which does not meet these specifications may be utilized only if approved by Gessner Engineering. All structural fill should be placed on prepared surfaces in lifts not to exceed eight inches loose measure, with compacted thickness not to exceed six inches. Select fill should be compacted to at least 95 percent of the Standard Proctor (ASTM D 698) density at a moisture content ranging within two percent of optimum moisture content for depths of three feet or less. If fill in excess of three feet is required, all structural and select fill deeper than three feet shall be compacted to 100 percent of Standard Proctor (ASTM D 698). Construction areas should be stripped of all vegetation, loose topsoil, surficial concrete, etc. Roots of trees to be removed within construction areas should be excavated and removed from the construction area. Once final subgrade elevation has been achieved, exposed soil subgrade areas shall be proofrolled with a 15 ton roller (minimum) or equivalent equipment as approved by the engineer to detect weak zones. Weak areas detected during the proof rolling process, as well as zones containing debris and/or organics and voids resulting from removal of tree roots, etc., should be removed and replaced with soils exhibiting similar classification, moisture content, and density as the adjacent in situ soils. Finally, the minimum amount of select fill shall be placed to evenly build up the pad. Select fill amounts may be increased to raise the building pad to the desired finished floor elevation, or to decrease the movement potential of the site. Site Fill For site areas not below pavements or structures, general fill may be used to achieve the desired grade. General fill shall have a plasticity index no greater than 30, and shall be free of debris and GESSNER ENGINEERING 15 CIVIL STRUCTURAL GEOTECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING organics. All general fill should be placed on prepared surfaces in lifts not to exceed eight inches loose measure, with compacted thickness not to exceed six inches. General fill should be compacted to at least 92 percent of the Standard Proctor (ASTM D 698) density at a moisture content ranging within two percent of optimum moisture content. General fill within five feet of the foundation perimeter for the top foot of soil may be installed as a clay cap on fill materials to prevent migration of surface water beneath the structure. This material shall be placed as noted above, and shall have a plasticity index in excess of 30. The fill shall be free of debris and organics, and shall be placed to comply with the Drainage section of this report. Utility Trench Fill The upper portion of utility excavations should be backfilled with properly compacted clay soils to minimize infiltration of surface water. A clay "plug" should be provided in the trench on the exterior of the building to prevent water from gaining access along the trench to the subgrade beneath the structure. This plug shall extend two feet beyond the pipe face in all directions, and be a minimum of two feet thick. Drainage The performance of the foundation system for the proposed lift station wet well will not only be dependent upon the quality of construction, but also upon the stability of the moisture content of the near surface soils. Therefore, Gessner Engineering highly recommends that site drainage be developed so that ponding of surface runoff near the structure does not occur. Accumulation of water near the structure foundation may cause significant moisture variations in the soils adjacent to the foundation, thus increasing the potential for structural distress. Slope adjacent to foundations is addressed in section 1803 of the International Building Code, which requires a five percent slope in the first ten feet. Where sites do not allow this, the code allows drainage structures to accommodate the runoff. It should be noted that this requirement conflicts with accessibility standards, which would govern at entrances and other travel paths. Other Issues Large trees adjacent to the foundation should be avoided, as they can affect soil moisture contents significantly by creating concentrations of dry soils around the trees. If trees adjacent to the foundation cannot be avoided, property owners should maintain the drip line of the trees, which is typically consistent with the root system, and can help keep the root system from causing foundation issues. Maintenance of the entire landscape is a good practice for maintaining consistent moisture contents and minimizing foundation movement. Proper landscape maintenance uses vegetation as a natural moisture content indicator, as both over and under watering will result in distress of the plants. Any element that can affect the moisture content of the soils supporting the foundation, such as pools or plumbing, pose a risk to stiffened slab-on-grade foundations. Care should be taken to prevent and quickly repair any leaks to minimize damage to the foundation. GESSNER ENGINEERING 16 CIVIL STRUCTURAL GEOTECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING Care should be taken when constructing adjacent to slopes to prevent bearing capacity failure due to nearby slope failure. For slopes steeper than 1 to 1, section 1808.7.2 of the 2012 International Building Code recommends a minimum set back from slopes of fifteen feet or one-half the height of the slope. Construction Materials Testing The performance of foundation systems and pavements are highly dependent upon the quality of construction. Compaction testing of fill material and concrete strength tests are required by the International Building Code. Therefore, we recommend that the foundation installation be monitored by Gessner Engineering to identify the proper bearing strata and depths and to help evaluate building pad and foundation construction. We would be pleased to develop a plan for foundation monitoring to be incorporated in the overall quality control program. Please contact Gessner Engineering for more information. GESSNER ENGINEERING 17 CIVIL STRUCTURAL GEOTECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING General Comments The analysis and recommendations presented in this report are based upon the data obtained from the boring performed at the indicated location and from other information discussed in this report. This report does not reflect variations that may occur across the site, or due to the modifying effects of weather. The nature and extent of such variations may not become evident until during or after construction. If variations appear, Gessner Engineering should be immediately notified so that further evaluation and supplemental recommendations can be provided. Limitations The scope of services for this project does not include, either specifically or by implication, any environmental or biological (e.g., mold, fungi, and bacteria) assessment of the site or identification or prevention of pollutants, hazardous materials, or conditions. If the owner is concerned about the potential for such contamination or pollution, other studies should be undertaken. For any excavation construction activities at this site, all Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) guidelines and directives should be followed by the Contractor during construction to insure a safe working environment. In regards to worker safety, OSHA Safety and Health Standards require the protection of workers from excavation instability in trench situations. This report has been prepared for the exclusive use of Mr. Chris Rhodes with Oldham Goodwin Group, LLC for the specific application to the project discussed and has been prepared in accordance with generally accepted geotechnical engineering practices. This report was written and recommendations were made based on the soil data collected on December 4, 2014. If construction is delayed or the proposed area experiences severe weather conditions, please contact the geotechnical engineer prior to construction. No warranties, either expressed or implied, are intended or made. In the event that changes in the nature, design, or location of the project as outlined in this report are planned, the conclusions and recommendations contained in this report shall not be considered valid unless Gessner Engineering reviews the changes and either verifies or modifies the conclusions of this report in writing. GESSNER ENGINEERING 18 CIVIL STRUCTURAL GEOTECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING APPENDIX ../Summary ../Project Layout ../Boring Log ../Symbols & Terms ../Geological Terms Mobile B-37 Orm Rig: Bubba Red GESSNER ENGINEERING CIVIL STRUCTURAL GEOTECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING RECOMMENDATIONS SUMMARY Foundation Type o Mat foundation o Stiffened slab-on-grade Design Parameters: mat foundation o Subgrade bearing capacity of 3,000 pounds per square foot (psf) o Remove 6"' of existing material o Replace with compacted select fill as required Design Parameters: stiffened slab-on-grade o Effective plasticity index (Pl) equals 29 o Subgrade bearing capacity of 3,000 pounds per square foot (psf) o Remove 1' of existing material o Replace with 2' of compacted select fill o Lime stabilize bottom 6" of evacuation prior to fill placement ***It should be noted that this summary simply outlines the recommendations made in the geotechnical engineering report. This summary is not intended to replace or supersede any part of these recommendations. The report shall be used for all design and construction procedures.*** GESSNER ENGINEERING 20 CIVIL STRUCTURAL GEOTECHNICAL LAND SURVEYING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS TESTING Scale NTS • 14-0699 Job No. Drawn By TK Checked By RG GESSNER Drawn Date 1 6.15 ENGINEERING Drawing No LOG OF BORING NO: 1 CLIENT: Oldham Goodwin Group, LLC PROJECT: Lift Station Wet Well Creek Meadows College Station. Texas PROJECT NO: 14-0699 DATE: 12/16/2014 DRILLER: Gessner Engineering LOCATION: N 30' 31' 37.28" w 96' 16' 58.82" GROUND SURFACE: Cleared Area 27 16 9.7 118.7 44 4.83 SC 42 27 16.9 47 SC -w/SandSeams 43 16 43 SC 43 29 21.1 100.2 33 1.12 SC -w/ClaySeamsandlrooOre 60 44 20.3 62 TERMINATED AT 30 FEET DRY AT COMPLETION CH Stiff to Hard Gray Fat Clay with Sand -w/ Iron Stains SYMBOLS AND TERMS USED ON BORING LOGS SAMPLER TYPES ~ E] ·~f~~ g 0 ~ CLAY SILT SAND SANDSTONE GRAVEL AUGER SHELBY TUBE D fj II D ~ ~ ~ LIMESTONE FILL ASPHALT CONCRETE SHALE SAMPLE LOST SPLIT SPOON TERMS DESCRIBING CONSISTENCY OR CONDITION COARSE GRAINED SOILS (Major Portion Retained on No.200 Sieve): Includes (1) clean gravels and sands, and (2) silty or clayey gravels and sands. Condition is rated according to relative density, as determined by laboratory tests. Standard Penetration, N-Value, Blows/Ft. 0-4 4-10 10-30 30-50 >50 Relative Density Very Loose Loose Medium Dense Dense Very Dense FINE GRAINED SOILS (Major Portion Passing No.200 Sieve): Includes (1) inorganic and organic silts and clays, (2) gravelly, sandy, or silty clays, and (3) clayey silts. Consistency is rated according to shearing strength, as indicated by penetrometer readings or by unconfined compression tests. Pocket Penetrometer Reading 0.25 0.~.75 1.0-1 .5 1.75-3.0 3.25-4.5 4.5+ Consistency Very Soft Soft Firm Stiff Very Stiff Hard Unconfined Compressive Strength, tons/sq. ft. less than 0.15 0.15 to 0.30 0.30 to 0.55 0.55 to 0.95 1.00 to 1.40 1.50 and higher Note: Slickensided and fissured clays may have lower unconfined compressive strengths than shown above, because of planes of weakness or cracks in the soil. EXPANSION POTENTIAL OF COHESIVE SOILS Plasticity Index 0-5 5-20 20-30 30-40 >40 Degree of Expansive Potential Very Low Low Moderate High Very High TERMS CHARACTERIZING SOIL STRUCTURE Parting -paper thin in size Seam -1/8" to 3/8" thick Layer -greater than 3" Slickensided Fissured Laminated lnterbedded Calcareous Well graded Poorly graded Flocculated -having inclined planes of weakness that are slick and glossy in appearance -containing shrinkage cracks, frequently filled with fine sand or silt; usually more or less vertical. -composed of thin layers of varying color and texture -composed of alternate layers of different soil types -containing appreciable quantities of calcium carbonate -having wide range in grain sizes and substantial amounts of all intermediate particle sizes -predominantly of one grain size, or having a range of sizes with some intermediate size missing -pertaining to cohesive silts that exhibit a loose knit or flakey structure GLOSSARY OF GEOLOGIC TERMS Aphanitic -dense, homogeneous rock with constituents so fine that they cannot be seen by the naked eye Argillaceous -containing, made of, or resembling clay; clayey Bentonitic -an absorbent aluminum silicate clay formed from volcanic ash and used Carbonaceous Chert Conchoidal Cross bedded Fluviatile Fossiliferous Friable Glauconitic Gypsiferous Igneous Inclusion lndurated Laminated Lateritic Lenticular Lignitic Marl in various adhesives, cements, and ceramic fillers -consisting of, containing, relating to, or yielding carbon - a siliceous rock of chalcedonic or opaline silica occurring in limestone -of, relating to, or being a surface characterized by smooth, shell-like convexities and concavities, as on fractured obsidian -intersecting layers of distinct soil deposits -produced by the action of a river or stream -containing fossils -readily crumbled, brittle -a greenish mineral of the mica group, a hydrous silicate of potassium, iron, aluminum, or magnesium found in greensand and used as a fertilizer and water softener -containing gypsum; a widespread colorless, white, or yellowish mineral, used in the manufacture of various plaster products, and fertilizers -rocks formed by solidification from a molten state; pyrogenic -a solid, liquid, or gaseous foreign body enclosed in a mineral or rock. -hardened soil that has been changed by extreme climate - a soil deposit divided into thin layers -pertaining to red residual soil in humid tropical and subtropical regions that is leached of soluble minerals, aluminum hydroxides, and silica but still contains concentrations of iron oxides and iron hydroxides. -lens-shaped grains of soil or rock -pertaining to soft, brownish-black coal in which the alteration of vegetable matter has proceeded further than in peat but not as far as in bituminous coal; also called brown coal -a loose and crumbling earthy deposit consisting mainly of calcite or dolomite; used as a fertilizer for soils deficient in lime Metamorphic -rocks changed in structure or composition as a result of metamorphism Micaceous caused by chemical reaction or heat and pressure -containing mica; any of a group of chemically and physically related aluminum silicate minerals, common in igneous and metamorphic rocks, characteristically splitting into flexible sheets used in insulation and electrical equipment Montmorillonitic -clays that are comprised mostly of montmorillonite; one of the three Morphology Porous Pyrite Scarp Siliceous Surficial Tuffaceous types of clay soil grains (illite, kaolinite, and montmorillonite) -refers to the geological characteristics, configuration, and evolution of rocks and land forms -admitting the passage of gas or liquid through pores or interstices -a brass-colored mineral occurring widely and used as an iron ore and in producing sulfur dioxide for sulfuric acid; also called fool's gold -a long steep slope or cliff at the edge of a plateau or ridge; usually formed by erosion -containing, resembling, relating to, or consisting of silica; a white or colorless crystalline compound occurring abundantly as quartz, sand, flint, agate, and many other minerals and used to manufacture a wide variety of materials, especially glass and concrete -of, relating to, or occurring on or near the surface of the earth -comprising rocks made of compacted volcanic ash varying in size from fine sand to coarse gravel; also called tufa Lift Station Design Worksheet DAILY WASTEWATER WASTEWATER FLOW STRENGTH (mg/I SOURCE REMARKS (Gallons/Person) 8005) Municipality Residential 100 200 Subdivision Residential 100 200 Trailer Park Transient 2-1 /2 persons/trailer 50 300 Mobile Home Park with showers 75 300 School with Cafeteria without showers 20 300 School with Cafeteria Overnight user 15 300 Recreational Parks Day User 30 200 Recreational Parks 5 JOO Office Building or Factory 20 300 Motel 50 300 Restaurant Per Meal 5 1000 Hospital Per Bed 200 300 Nursing Home Per Bed 100 300 Design Source: Subdivision Residential JOO 200 Daily Wastewater Flow: RESULTS Average Daily Flow (ADF) = 43,788 GPD GIVEN Total Units = Capita per Unit = Peaking Factor = 164 2.67 4 (1) Average Daily Flow (ADF) = Peak Flow = 30.41 gpm 121.63 gpm ¢:J Retention Volume: GIVEN RESULTS (2) Longest 24 Month Power Outage = 29.0 min Required Wet Well Storage = 3,527 gallons ¢:J Wet Well Geometry & Pump Cycle: GIVEN Wet Well Diameter = RESULTS 6.00 ft Total Wet Well Depth = 20.75 ft 291.25 ft Useable Wet Well Storage = 3, 171 gallons Top Elevation of Wet Well = Designed Freeboard = Pump On Elevation = 51 in (3) Useable Line Storage = 3,480 gallons 274.00 ft Total Retention Storage Provided = 6,651 gallons ./ Pump Off Elevation = Designed Wet Well Sump = Designed Firm Pump Rate = (5) Influent Gravity Invert Elevation = Notes: 272.00 ft Average Daily Flow Conditions 18 in Pump Time Off= 13.9 min 133 gpm JPump Time On = 4.1 min 274.95 ft (4) Pumping Cycle Time = 18.0 min Peak Flow Conditions Pump Time Off= Pump Time On = (4) Pumping Cycle Time = 3.5 min 37.2 min 40.7 min 1. Average daily flow is based on a twenty-four hour useage period when converting to gal Ions per minute. 2. Longest power outage supplied by BTU Electric in past 24 months (1120115); 3. Storage determined at an elevation of287.0'; 4. Pump cycle shall not be less than six minutes for submersible pumps and ten minutes for non-submersible pumps. 5. Influent sanitary sewer line's invert shall be above the "Lead Pump On" elevation; 260-0551 TCEQ Chp 217 .xlsx 4/2/201 5 j j Tank Floatation Worksheet Design Calculations COLOR & SHADE LEGEND Description Input Value Into This Area Unused Cell (No Entry Required) Referenced Number (No Entry Required) Calculated Result Reference or Instructions DESIGN INPUT VALUES TANK GEOMETRY Description Interior Tank Diameter Interior Tank Depth Wall Thickness Base Thickness Total Depth of Tank Tanlc Above Final Grade Outside Perimeter of Tank Unit Weight of Tank SOIL PROPERTIES Description di bJ lw tb H h p W1 L -0.00 I 1.00 lnfonnation Value 6 20.75 7.75 12.00 21.75 3 22.91 145 Value Soil Classification I Consistency in Place Soft CL Unit Adhesion Value c 0 Table 2-6-7 Geotechnical Soil/Foundations -NA VDOCKS, DM-7 CALCULATED FORCES Description Value e1g to Skin Friction Force (Fs = cHP) Uplift Force (Weight of Water Displaced) Factory of Safety FOS 1.53 260-0551 TCEQ Chp 217.xlsx Unit ft ft in in ft ft ft lb/ft3 Unit lb/ft2 Unit 4/2/2015 WILL NOT FLOAT Page 1of1 Bearing Capacity Worksheet Design Calculations COLOR & SHADE LEGEND Description Input Value Into This Area Unused Cell (No Entry Required) Referenced Number (No Entry Required) Calculated Result Reference or Instructions DESIGN INPUT VALVES TANK GEOMETRY Description Interior Tank Diameter Interior Tank Depth Wall Thickness Base Thickness Total Depth of Tank Tank Above Final Grade Outside Perimeter of Tank Maximum Depth of Storage Unit Weight of Tank SOIL PROPERTIES Description Soil Classification Consistency in Place Allowable Bearing Capacity As reported in Geotechnical Report (FOS=2) CALCULATED FORCES Description e1 to Weight of Equipment Weight of Wastewater in Wet Well Weight of wastewater is estimated at 75 pcf Compensation for Displaced Soils Total Weight Exposed to Subgrade W = WT+WE+Ww-Ws Applied Stress 260-055 1 TCEQ Chp 217 .xlsx dJ hi !w tb H h p dw Wt c I 0.00 I 1.00 Information I Value 6 20.75 7.75 12.00 21.75 0.5 22.91 16.50 Value CL Stiff 3,000 Value 145 Unit ft ft in in ft ft ft ft lb/ft3 Unit lb/ft2 Unit Ws I 37,472 .761 lbs w c 49,756.581 lbs 1,192.14 psf 4/2/201 5 PASSES Page 1of 1 xylem Let's Solve Water CP 3085 MT 3-434 Technical specification 61°0 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Elf. 160mm 350 400 450 500 Note: Picture rright not correspond to the cu«ent configuration. General Shrouded single or multi-channel impeller pumps with large throughlets and single volute pump casing for liquids containing solids and fibres. Cast iron design with double sealing technology. Some models available as stainless steel versions. Impeller ljllpeller material Grey cast iron 3 1/8 inch 80mm Water, pure [US g.p.mOischarge Flange Diameter Suction Flange Diameter Impeller diameter Cu1Ve accoofng lo: ISO 9906 grade 2 annex 1 or 2 160 mm Installation: P ·Semi permanent, Wet Project I Project ID Number of blades Throughlet diameter Motor Motor# Stator variant Frequency Rated voltage Number of poles Phases Rated power Rated current Starting current Rated speed Power factor 1/1 Load 3/4 Load 1/2 Load Efficiency 1/1 Load 3/4 Load 1/2 Load Configuration I Created by 1 3 inch C3085.183 15-10-4AL-W 3hp 61 60 Hz 460 v 4 3- 3 hp 4.5 A 25 A 1705 rpm 0.81 0.74 0.62 77.5 % 78.0 % 76.0 % I Created on 2015-01-27 I Last update xylem Let's Solve Water CP 3085 MT 3-434 Performance curve Pump Dis::harge Flange Diameter 3 1/8 inch Suction Flange Diameter 80 mm Impeller diameter s•1,.· Number of blades 1 Throughlet diameter 3 inch 42 40 38 36 34 32 30 28 26 24 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 [%] 50 40 30 20 10 [hpj 3.5 3.0 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.5 0.0 [ft] 30 25 20 15 Motor Motor# Stator variant Frequency Rated voltage Number of poles Phases Rated power Rated current Starting current Rated ~eed 10 5 133 US g.p.m. 0 50 100 150 200 Wst«,pcre Project I Project ID 250 C3085.183 15-10-4AL-W 3hp 61 60 Hz 460 v 4 3- 3 hp 4.5A 25A 1705 rpm 300 350 400 Power factor 1/1 Load 0.81 3/4 Load 0.74 1/2 Load 0.62 Efficiency 1/1 Load 77.5 % 3/4 Load 78.0 % 1/2 Load 76.0 % 34 160mm 34 160mm 450 500 [US g.p.m.] C11Ve accordng tl: ISO 9!l06 fTOOe 2 ,..,_ 1 or 2 I Created by I Created on 2015-01.27 I Last update xylem Let's Solve Water CP 3085 MT 3-434 Duty Analysis 41 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Eff. 61 °0 34 160mm O.:r-,....,....,...,...,.-,....,...,....,...~1-3~3~U~S-g~.~p.=mF ........ -.-.,.....,....,..~,....,.-.-,....,._,...,.....,....,....,-....... ~,....,....,...,...,....,....,....,....,..~,....,.~..-.-.-.,...,. ........ Pumps running /System Project 0 50 100 150 200 war..-,p.re lndlv I dual pump Flow Head Shaft power 133USg.pm. 30.3ft 2.11ll I Project ID 250 Total Flow 133USg.pm. 300 350 400 450 500 [US g.p.m.] Head Shaft power J0.3n 2.11ll I Created by CtlW accorclng IO: ISO 9906 fTade 2 ameK 1 or 2 Specific Pump eff. energy NPSHre 48.5% 251 IMWUSMG 20.6ft I Created on 2015.01 ·27 I Last update 34 ~ (TO FURTHEST POINT) REF. LINE 23i 51 1 3 ~ REF. LINE 1 ~ 4 196 2,, GUIDE BARS 04" STD. CLASS 125 C.I. FL ANGE (NOM. SIZE) ~IN 0 N 'ii MIN LEVEL t'Jl"<t t'Jl"<t ; 11} 0 N .,--- * ; N w ; 11} LINE -tj- I u (/) 0 Li.... 0 _J u I J ~ ..I VIE W w-w BOLT 0~ ( 4x) Wei * DIMENSION TO ENDS OF GUIDE BARS Pum Disch rm.~ AUTOCAD DRAWING 80 ~~'""NK Cheokcd Dot• 08081 4 Dime n s ion a I d r w g tz"0;;;:-,. ------'-"'---' ----1~=~-1 CP 3085 MT •• , "0 5399 Denomination 4" 4" 5383300 6