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10/14/2021 - Regular Agenda Packet - City CouncilCollege Station, TX Meeting Agenda City Council - Amended 1101 Texas Ave, College Station, TX 77840 Internet: https://zoom.us/j/96728393278 *Phone: 888 475 4499 and Meeting ID: 967 2839 3278 October 14, 2021 2:30 PM City Hall Council Chambers College Station, TX Page 1 This meeting will offer both in-person and remote participation following both the City’s Guidelines for in-person, virtual attendance, and the speaker protocol in the agenda. The city uses a third-party vendor to help host the meeting and if the call-in number is not functioning access will be through the internet link only. 1.Call to Order. 2.Executive Session is Closed to the Public and Will Be Held in the Administrative Conference Room. The Open Meeting Will Resume No Earlier Than 5:00 PM. Consultation with Attorney {Gov’t Code Section 551.071}; Possible action. The City Council may seek advice from its attorney regarding a pending or contemplated litigation subject or settlement offer or attorney-client privileged information. Litigation is an ongoing process and questions may arise as to a litigation tactic or settlement offer, which needs to be discussed with the City Council. Upon occasion the City Council may need information from its attorney as to the status of a pending or contemplated litigation subject or settlement offer or attorney- client privileged information. After executive session discussion, any final action or vote taken will be in public. The following subject(s) may be discussed. Litigation a. Kathryn A. Stever-Harper as Executrix for the Estate of John Wesley Harper v. City of College Station and Judy Meeks; No. 15,977-PC in the County Court No. 1, Brazos County, Texas b. McCrory Investments II, LLC d/b/a Southwest Stor Mor v. City of College Station; Cause No. 17- 000914-CV-361; In the 361st District Court, Brazos County, Texas c. City of College Station v. Gerry Saum, Individually, and as Independent Executrix of the Estate of Susan M. Wood, Deceased; Cause No. 17-002742-CV-361; In the 361st District Court, Brazos County, Texas Real Estate {Gov't Code Section 551.072}; Possible action. The City Council may deliberate the purchase, exchange, lease or value of real property if deliberation in an open meeting would have a detrimental effect on the position of the City in negotiations with a third person. After executive session discussion, any final action or vote taken will be in public. The following subject(s) may be discussed: a. An approximately 19 acre tract of land along the north frontage road of Texas State Highway 6 south of its intersection with Corporate Parkway. b. Property generally located in the southwest quadrant of Texas State Highway 6 and Harvey Road. Personnel {Gov’t Code Section 551.074}; Page 1 of 310 City Council - Amended Page 2 October 14, 2021 Possible action. The City Council may deliberate the appointment, employment, evaluation, reassignment, duties, discipline, or dismissal of a public officer. After executive session discussion, any final action or vote taken will be in public. The following public officer(s) may be discussed: a. City Attorney b. City Secretary c. City Municipal Court Judge d. City Auditor e. City Manager f. Council Self Evaluation Economic Incentive Negotiations {Gov't Code Section 551.087}; Possible action. The City Council may deliberate on commercial or financial information that the City Council has received from a business prospect that the City Council seeks to have locate, stay or expand in or near the city which the City Council in conducting economic development negotiations may deliberate on an offer of financial or other incentives for a business prospect. After executive session discussion, any final action or vote taken will be in public. The following subject(s) maybe discussed: a. Potential incentives for a possible expansion of a business located within the Biocorridor area near the intersection of Health Science Center Parkway and Riverside Parkway. 3.Reconvene from Executive Session and Take Action, if Any. 4.Pledge of Allegiance, Invocation, and Consider Absence Request. Speaker Protocol An individual who wishes to address the City Council regarding any item on the agenda other than those items posted for Executive Session shall register with the City Secretary two (2) hours prior to the meeting being called to order. Individuals must register to speak or provide written comments at https://forms.cstx.gov/Forms/CSCouncil or provide a name and phone number by calling 979-764- 3500. Upon being called to speak an individual must state their name and city of residence, including the state of residence if the city is located out of state. Speakers are encouraged to identify their College Station neighborhood or geographic location. Each speaker’s remarks are limited to three (3) minutes. Any speaker addressing the Council through the use of a translator may speak for six (6) minutes. At the (3) minute mark the City Secretary will announce that the speaker must conclude their remarks. 5.Hear Visitors. During Hear Visitors an individual may address the City Council on any item which does not appear on the posted agenda. The City Council will listen and receive the information presented by the speaker, ask staff to look into the matter, or place the issue on a future agenda. Topics of operational concern shall be directed to the City Manager. 6.Workshop Items. 6.1.Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding potential changes to the Dockless Bike Share Program ordinance. Sponsors:Venessa Garza Attachments:None 7.Consent Items. Page 2 of 310 City Council - Amended Page 3 October 14, 2021 Presentation, discussion, and possible action on consent items which consist of ministerial or "housekeeping" items as allowed by law. A Councilmember may request additional information at this time. Any Councilmember may remove an item from Consent for discussion or a separate vote. 7.1.Presentation, discussion, and possible action of minutes for: • September 23, 2021 Council Meeting Sponsors:Tanya Smith Attachments:1.CCM092321 DRAFT Minutes 7.2.Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding Change Order No. 1 in the amount of $80,100 to the professional services contract with Kimley Horn and Associates, Inc for the Jones Butler Extension and Roundabout project. Sponsors:Emily Fisher Attachments:1.Change Order 1 2.20210811_Jones Butler Roundabout Amendment 1 to Client Agreement 7.3.Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding the first renewal of a contract to Brazos Paving, Inc. for base failure repairs and pavement treatments in an amount not to exceed $4,613,250. This item is for contracted equipment, labor, and materials for standard maintenance activities associated with asphalt streets. Sponsors:Pete Caler Attachments:1.Signed Renewal #1 For Annual Price Agreement For Base Failure Repairs & Road Reconstruction Treatments 7.4.Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding a construction contract with Larry Young Paving, Inc. in the amount of $8,799,523.75 for the Greens Prairie Road Widening Phase 2 project. Sponsors:Emily Fisher Attachments:1.Project Map 2.21-058 Tabulation 7.5.Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding a construction contract with Jacody Construction, LP in the amount of $278,521.79 for the Fleet Upgrades - Oil Pit and Storm Drain project. Sponsors:Emily Fisher Attachments:1.21-060 Tab 2.Project Location 7.6.Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding an ordinance approving a participation agreement by and between the City, Costco Wholesale Corporation and RSR Construction Company for the development of certain public infrastructure including a detention pond and authorization of public funds in the amount of $1,239,660 for property generally located near the intersection of Earl Rudder Freeway and Corporate Drive in the Midtown Business Park. Sponsors:Natalie Ruiz Attachments:1.Participation Agreement-Available in City Secretary's Office 2.Ordinance 7.7.Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding a reciprocal easement and shared use agreement with Costco Wholesale Corporation for property generally located near the intersection of Earl Rudder Freeway and Corporate Drive in the Midtown Business Park. Sponsors:Natalie Ruiz Page 3 of 310 City Council - Amended Page 4 October 14, 2021 Attachments:1.Reciprocal Easement and Shared Use Agreement-Available in the City Secretary's Office 7.8.Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding a Declaration of Restrictive Covenants by and between the City of College Station and Costco Wholesale Corporation for property generally located near the intersection of Earl Rudder Freeway and Corporate Drive in the Midtown Business Park. Sponsors:Natalie Ruiz Attachments:1.Declaration of Restrictive Covenants-Available in the City Secretary's Office 7.9.Presentation, discussion, and possible action on the second reading of a ten (10) year franchise agreement with the City of Bryan for retail sale of electricity within the City of College Station as certificated to Bryan by the Public Utility Commission of Texas. Sponsors:Brian Piscacek Attachments:1.BTU_Franchise_FINAL_(8-26-2021) 7.10 . Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding the approval of a contract with Oldham Goodwin Group, LLC for commercial real estate brokerage services for City-owned property in the Midtown Business Park. Sponsors:Natalie Ruiz Attachments:1.21300702 Oldham Goodwin 8.Regular Items. 8.1.Public Hearing, presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding an ordinance repealing the official City of College Station Comprehensive Plan (adopted by Ordinance No. 3186) and adopting a new Comprehensive Plan as part of the 10-year update to the City of College Station Comprehensive Plan, and all associated map updates within the Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan, the Water System Master Plan, and the Wastewater System Master Plan, as the "Official City of College Station Comprehensive Plan". Sponsors:Alyssa Halle-Schramm Attachments:1.Ordinance_Comp Plan Update 2.Updated Comprehensive Plan 3.Proposed Bicycle Facilities Map 4.Proposed Pedestrian Facilities Map 5.Future Water System Exhibit 6.Future Wastewater System Exhibit 7.Summary of Public Input 8.2.Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding a resolution to set a public hearing on amendments to land use assumptions, capital improvement plans, and impact fees for roadway, water, and wastewater. Sponsors:Jason Schubert, Carol Cotter Attachments:1.Resolution 8.3.Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding an ordinance consenting to and extending the Mayor's renewal of a disaster declaration due to public health emergency. Sponsors:Bryan Woods Attachments:1.Disaster Declaration Renewal Ordinance 10-14-21 Page 4 of 310 City Council - Amended Page 5 October 14, 2021 9.Council Calendar - Council May Discuss Upcoming Events. 10.Items of Community Interest. The Council may receive reports from a Council Member or City Staff about items of community interest for which notice has not been given, including: expressions of thanks, congratulations or condolence; information regarding holiday schedules; honorary or salutary recognitions of a public official, public employee, or other citizen; reminders of upcoming events organized or sponsored by the City of College Station; information about a social, ceremonial or community event organized or sponsored by an entity other than the City of College Station that is scheduled to be attended by a Council Member, another city official or staff of the City of College Station; and announcements involving an imminent threat to the public health and safety of people in the City of College Station that has arisen after the posting of the agenda. 11.Council Reports on Committees, Boards, and Commissions. 12.Future Agenda Items and Review of Standing List of Council Generated Future Agenda Items. A Council Member may make a request to City Council to place an item for which no notice has been given on a future agenda or may inquire about the status of an item on the standing list of council generated future agenda items. A Council Member’s or City Staff’s response to the request or inquiry will be limited to a statement of specific factual information related to the request or inquiry or the recitation of existing policy in response to the request or inquiry. Any deliberation of or decision about the subject of a request will be limited to a proposal to place the subject on the agenda for a subsequent meeting. 13.Adjourn. The City council may adjourn into Executive Session to consider any item listed on the agenda if a matter is raised that is appropriate for Executive Session discussion. City Secretary This building is wheelchair accessible. Persons with disabilities who plan to attend this meeting and who may need accommodations, auxiliary aids, or services such as interpreters, readers, or large print are asked to contact the City Secretary’s Office at (979) 764-3541, TDD at 1-800-735-2989, or email adaassistance@cstx.gov at least two business days prior to the meeting so that appropriate arrangements can be made. If the City does not receive notification at least two business days prior to the meeting, the City will make a reasonable attempt to provide the necessary accommodations. Penal Code § 30.07. Trespass by License Holder with an Openly Carried Handgun. "Pursuant to Section 30.07, Penal Code (Trespass by License Holder with an Openly Carried Handgun) A Person Licensed under Subchapter H, Chapter 411, I certify that the above Notice of Meeting was posted on the website and at College Station City Hall, 1101 Texas Avenue, College Station, Texas, on October 11, 2021 at 1:00 p.m. Page 5 of 310 City Council - Amended Page 6 October 14, 2021 Government Code (Handgun Licensing Law), may not enter this Property with a Handgun that is Carried Openly." Codigo Penal § 30.07. Traspasar Portando Armas de Mano al Aire Libre con Licencia. “Conforme a la Seccion 30.07 del codigo penal (traspasar portando armas de mano al aire libre con licencia), personas con licencia bajo del Sub-Capitulo H, Capitulo 411, Codigo de Gobierno (Ley de licencias de arma de mano), no deben entrar a esta propiedad portando arma de mano al aire libre.” Page 6 of 310 October 14, 2021 Item No. 6.1. Dockless Bike Share Program Ordinance Sponsor:Venessa Garza Reviewed By CBC:Bicycle, Pedestrian, & Greenways Advisory Board Agenda Caption:Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding potential changes to the Dockless Bike Share Program ordinance. Relationship to Strategic Goals: Good Governance Improving Mobility Sustainable City Recommendation(s): Staff recommends that City Council provide direction as desired. The Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Advisory Board discussed this item at their September 13th meeting. Summary: City Council adopted an ordinance in 2018 to regulate and permit bike share companies in the City in response to Texas A&M University’s introduction of a bike share program. The ordinance currently excludes scooters and other electric modes. Since that time, there have been changes with the current operator, Veoride, to ensure a successful and orderly program, as well as interest from companies including Veoride to offer electric micromobility options. The term micromobility includes different types of microvehicles that are typically human powered or electric, low speed (i.e. less than 20 miles per hour) and light weight. Staff will propose changes to the City’s current ordinance in response to the changing environment. Budget & Financial Summary: N/A Attachments: None Page 7 of 310 October 14, 2021 Item No. 7.1. Minutes Sponsor:Tanya Smith, City Secretary Reviewed By CBC: Agenda Caption:Presentation, discussion, and possible action of minutes for: • September 23, 2021 Council Meeting Relationship to Strategic Goals: Good Governance Recommendation(s): Recommends Approval. Summary: N/A Budget & Financial Summary: None Attachments: 1.CCM092321 DRAFT Minutes Page 8 of 310 CCM092321 Minutes Page 1 MINUTES OF THE CITY COUNCIL MEETING VIA TELECONFERENCE CITY OF COLLEGE STATION SEPTEMBER 23, 2021 STATE OF TEXAS § § COUNTY OF BRAZOS § Present: Karl Mooney, Mayor Council: Bob Brick John Crompton Linda Harvell Elizabeth Cunha John Nichols Dennis Maloney City Staff: Bryan Woods, City Manager Jeff Capps, Deputy City Manager Carla Robinson, City Attorney Tanya Smith, City Secretary Lisa McCracken, Records Management Administrator 1. Call to Order and Announce a Quorum is Present. With a quorum present, the Meeting of the College Station City Council was called to order by Mayor Mooney via In-Person and Teleconference at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, September 23, 2021, in the Council Chambers of the City of College Station City Hall, 1101 Texas Avenue, College Station, Texas 77840. 2. Executive Session In accordance with the Texas Government Code §551.071-Consultation with Attorney, §551.072- Real Estate, and §551.074-Personnel, the College Station City Council convened into Executive Session at 4:00 p.m. on September 23, 2021, to continue discussing matters pertaining to: A. Consultation with Attorney to seek advice regarding pending or contemplated litigation, to wit: Kathryn A. Stever-Harper as Executrix for the Estate of John Wesley Harper v. City of College Station and Judy Meeks; No. 15,977-PC in the County Court No. 1, Brazos County, Texas; and McCrory Investments II, LLC d/b/a Southwest Stor Mor v. City of College Station; Cause No. 17-000914-CV-361; In the 361st District Court, Brazos County, Texas; and City of College Station v. Gerry Saum, Individually, and as Independent Executrix of the Estate of Susan M. Wood, Deceased; Cause No. 17-002742-CV-361; In the 361st District Court, Brazos County, Texas; and Page 9 of 310 CCM092321 Minutes Page 2 B. Consultation with attorney to receive legal advice; to wit: Legal advice regarding potential City participation in the global opioid settlements. Legal issues related to enforcement of violations of zoning restrictions by allowing more than four unrelated individuals to reside in a single-family dwelling unit. C. Deliberation on the purchase, exchange, lease, or value of real property; to wit: An approximately 19-acre tract of land along the north frontage road of Texas State Highway 6 south at its intersection with Corporate Parkway. D. Deliberation on the appointment, employment, evaluation, reassignment, duties, discipline, or dismissal of a public officer; to wit: Municipal Court Judge City Attorney City Manager Council Self-Evaluation 3. Reconvene from Executive Session and take action, if any. Executive Session suspended at 5:56 p.m. and will return after the public meeting. 4. Pledge of Allegiance, Invocation, consider absence request. 5. Hear Visitors Comments No one signed up to speak. 6. Workshop Items 6.1. Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding draft land use assumptions, capital improvement plans, and roadway costing template for the upcoming 5-year study updates of roadway, water, and wastewater impact fees. Jason Schubert, Planning and Development, introduced Jeff Whitacre, Kimley-Horn and Richard Weatherly, Freese and Nichols who will present the draft land use assumptions (LUA) and capital improvements plans (CIP), and roadway costing template for the 5-year study updates of roadway, water, and wastewater impact fees. Jeff Whitacre and Richard Weatherly presented an overview of land use assumptions: Establishes Infrastructure Demands used in Master Plans Population and Housing Unit Projections obtained from projected new developments Coordinate with Future Land Use Plan Known Developments Infill Focus Areas GIS Based Mr. Whitacre stated that as most stakeholder questions and concerns involved roadway impact fees, staff met with a development stakeholder group on August 23rd to discuss the draft LUA and CIP. Page 10 of 310 CCM092321 Minutes Page 3 He explained that in response to the feedback, staff has revised the draft roadway CIP to remove Rock Prairie Road West that is west of Holleman Drive South and Holleman Drive South that is south of Rock Prairie Road West due to wastewater limitations within the next 10 years. Also, the amount of roadway the city is responsible for will be reduced in the study for those that are anticipated to be at least partially constructed by development. Staff does not recommend pursuing the third item that would remove roadways that have been constructed or have City funds allocated toward them. These roadways are eligible impact fee projects, have excess capacity that future development will use, and the City is paying debt service. The IFAC was presented the draft LUA and CIP for each of the study updates on September 2, 2021. There was general agreement amongst IFAC on the draft documents including the revised approach for roadway impact fees. Some IFAC members expressed interest in more roadways being considered while another requested that additional roadways be removed and questioned some of the land use assumptions. Feedback from Council will be used to finalize the study updates so they may be presented to IFAC for their final comments in October and presented to Council in November for formal consideration and adoption. Mr. Schubert stated that the stakeholder feedback is summarized into 3 major themes: 1) some roadways should not be included until wastewater limitations are resolved; 2) major collectors/developer-built roads should be considered differently; and 3) roadways that have been completed or have City funds allocated toward them should not be included in the impact fee CIP. Staff Recommended Major Themes Recommended: Some roadways not needed until Wastewater is planned Portions of Holleman Dr S and Rock Prairie Rd W removed from impact fee CIP Recommended: Major Collectors/developer-built roads should be considered differently Major Collectors to be built by development reduced to 42% and 4-lane roads reduced by 50% to account for portions assumed to be constructed by development. Not Recommended: Not include roadways that already have funds allocated Excess capacity for future development remains, City paying debt toward projects. A majority of the City Council expressed general approval of the direction of the studies conducted to date and directed staff to look into ways to exempt low-income housing from impact fees as well as perform an analysis on the opportunity cost of using property taxes compared with impact fees. 7. CONSENT ITEMS Presentation, discussion, and possible action on consent items which consist of ministerial, or "housekeeping" items as allowed by law: A Councilmember may request additional information at this time. Any Councilmember may remove an item from the Consent Agenda for a separate vote. No items pulled for discussion. 7.1. Presentation, possible action, and discussion of minutes for: September 9, 2021 Council Meeting Page 11 of 310 CCM092321 Minutes Page 4 7.2. Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding the renewal of a contract with Utility Restoration Services, Inc. for annual pad-mount equipment repair and restoration in the amount of $321,644.66. 7.3. Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding approval of the City’s Annual Price Agreement for Electric Outdoor Breakers for Substations, with an estimated annual expenditure for Anixter Inc. not to exceed $119,110. 7.4. Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding City of College Station Excess Liability and Workers’ Compensation Insurance, Property/Boiler & Machinery, Commercial Crime, EMT Liability, Auto Property Damage, Cyber Liability, and Unmanned Aircraft liability and property. FY22 premiums for all lines of coverage are not to exceed $844,000. 7.5. Presentation, discussion, and possible action on a funding agreement between the City of College Station and the Amber Alert Network Brazos Valley for FY22 in the amount of $5,000. 7.6. Presentation, discussion, and possible action approving Resolution No. 09-23-21-7.6 authorizing expenditure to the Aggieland Humane Society, Inc. in the amount of $261,600. 7.7. Presentation, discussion, and possible action on a funding agreement between the City of College Station and the Arts Council of the Brazos Valley for FY22 in the amount of $35,000. 7.8. Presentation, discussion, and possible action on a funding agreement between the City of College Station and the Arts Council of the Brazos Valley for FY22 in the amount of $463,000. 7.9. Presentation, discussion, and possible action on a funding agreement between the City of College Station and the Bryan/College Station Chamber of Commerce for FY22 in the amount of $25,000. 7.10. Presentation, discussion, and possible action on a funding agreement between the City of College Station and the Brazos Valley Economic Development Corporation for FY22 in the amount of $350,000. 7.11. Presentation, discussion, and possible action on a funding agreement between the City of College Station and the College Station Noon Lions Club for FY22 in the amount of $16,500. 7.12. Presentation, discussion, and possible action on a funding agreement between the City of College Station and the Memorial for All Veterans of the Brazos Valley for FY22 in the amount of $30,000. 7.13. Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding a professional services contract with Bleyl Engineering in the amount of $308,000 for the Medical District Interceptor Project Phases II and III project. 7.14. Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding Change Order 3 deducting $131,425 from the professional services contract with Jones & Carter, Inc. for the East Side Sewer project. Page 12 of 310 CCM092321 Minutes Page 5 7.15. Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding an agreement between the City of College Station and Belmont Icehouse, LLC for marketing and advertising services in the amount of $400,000. 7.16. Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding the approval of a contract with Jaco Roofing & Construction, Inc. for the roof replacement at 2611 Texas Ave. in the amount of $117,970. 7.17. Presentation, discussion, and possible action on the first reading of a ten (10) year franchise agreement with the City of Bryan for retail sale of electricity within the City of College Station as certificated to Bryan by the Public Utility Commission of Texas. 7.18. Presentation, discussion, and possible action approving the Second Amendment to the Property Purchase Agreement between the City of College Station and Costco Wholesale Corporation for an approximately 18.670-acre tract of land located generally near the intersection of Earl Rudder Freeway and Corporate Drive in the Midtown Business Park. MOTION: Upon a motion made by Councilmember Harvell and a second by Councilmember Nichols, the City Council voted seven (7) for and none (0) opposed, to approve the Consent Items. The motion carried unanimously. 8. REGULAR ITEMS 8.1. Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding a construction contract with Larry Young Paving Inc. in the amount of $4,992,868 for the Rock Prairie Road West Widening Project. James Smith, Capital Projects, stated that the City is undertaking a project to widen Rock Prairie Road West from FM 2154 to Holleman Drive from a 2-lane rural roadway to 3 lane concrete section with bike lanes and sidewalks. This includes widening the railroad crossing and improving the interconnect signal at the Rock Prairie and FM 2154 intersection. This will significantly help with the mobility and safety of this intersection. Widening the crossing and improving the gates of the existing crossing requires design and approval by Union Pacific Railroad. The project was bid via sealed bid proposal in July 2021, RFP #21-056. Two (2) sealed proposals were submitted, and Larry Young Paving was selected as the top scoring responder. He stated that a budget in the amount of $7,390,000 was included for this project in the Streets Capital Projects Fund. A total of $2,074,250.55 has been expended or committed to date, leaving a balance of $5,315,749.45 in the total project budget for this construction contract. MOTION: Upon a motion made by Councilmember Nichols and a second by Councilmember Maloney, the City Council voted seven (7) for and none (0) opposed, to approve a construction contract with Larry Young Paving Inc. in the amount of $4,992,868 for the Rock Prairie Road West Widening Project. The motion carried unanimously. 8.2. Presentation, discussion, and possible action on Ordinance No. 2021-4300 amending Ordinance No. 2021-4281 ordering a General and Special Election to be held on November 2, 2021 for the purpose of electing City Councilmember Place 4 and City Councilmember Place 6, submitting proposed amendments to the City Charter to the voters; establishing early voting locations and polling places for this election; and making provisions for conducting the election. Page 13 of 310 CCM092321 Minutes Page 6 The amended ordinance modifies the election day voting locations for voting in the general and special election. (Presentación, posible acción y discusiónsobre la modificación de la Ordenanza No. 2021-4281 ordenando que se celebren elecciones generales y especiales el 2 de noviembre de 2021 con el propósito de elegir al Miembro del Concejo Municipal Lugar 4 y el Lugar 6 del Concejo Municipal, presentando propuesta enmiendas a los Estatutos de la Ciudad para los votantes; el establecimiento de lugares de votación anticipada y lugares de votación para esta elección; y tomar las disposiciones necesarias para llevar a cabo la elección.) Tanya Smith, City Secretary, stated that this amendment to the Election Ordinance has been brought to council because Christ United Methodist Church informed our Election Administrator that their facility will not be available for November due to the construction in that area. The Election Administrator has contacted other facilities in that area, and they are either unavailable or do not have adequate parking available. Mrs. Smith explained that there will be proper signage and a list of other locations to vote at posted at Christ United Methodist Church on Election Day. Also, we will place the maps on our website and on all social media to inform the voters. There will still be 24 other vote centers available to all citizens on Election Day, including the Graham Road Meeting and Training Facilities, which is normally not available on Election Day. MOTION: Upon a motion made by Councilmember Brick and a second by Councilmember Harvell, the City Council voted seven (7) for and none (0) opposed, to adopt Ordinance No. 2021-4300, amending Ordinance No. 2021-4281 ordering a General and Special Election to be held on November 2, 2021 for the purpose of electing City Councilmember Place 4 and City Councilmember Place 6, submitting proposed amendments to the City Charter to the voters; establishing early voting locations and polling places for this election; and making provisions for conducting the election. The amended ordinance modifies the election day voting locations for voting in the general and special election. The motion carried unanimously. 9. Council Calendar Council reviewed the calendar. 10. Items of Community Interest: The Council may receive reports from a Council Member or City Staff about items of community interest for which notice has not been given, including: expressions of thanks, congratulations or condolence; information regarding holiday schedules; honorary or salutary recognitions of a public official, public employee, or other citizen; reminders of upcoming events organized or sponsored by the City of College Station; information about a social, ceremonial or community event organized or sponsored by an entity other than the City of College Station that is scheduled to be attended by a Council Member, another city official or staff of the City of College Station; and announcements involving an imminent threat to the public health and safety of people in the City of College Station that has arisen after the posting of the agenda. Councilmember Harvell recognized Sherry Frisk and HPC for preserving the history of College Station by identifying unmarked graves in our cemeteries. Councilmember Maloney recognized the CSPD for officer promotions and their dedication to continuing education. Councilmember Maloney recognized Holy Cross Lutheran Church for the live oak trees they have Page 14 of 310 CCM092321 Minutes Page 7 planted. 11. Council Reports on Committees, Boards, and Commission: A Council Member may make a report regarding meetings of City Council boards and commissions or meetings of boards and committees on which a Council Member serves as a representative that have met since the last council meeting. (Committees listed in Coversheet) Councilmember Nichols report on the Health Board. 12. Future Agenda Items and Review of Standing List of Council Generated Future Agenda Items: A Council Member may make a request to City Council to place an item for which no notice has been given on a future agenda or may inquire about the status of an item on the standing list of council generated future agenda items. A Council Member’s or City Staff’s response to the request or inquiry will be limited to a statement of specific factual information related to the request or inquiry or the recitation of existing policy in response to the request or inquiry. Any deliberation of or decision about the subject of a request will be limited to a proposal to place the subject on the agenda for a subsequent meeting. Councilmember Harvell requested presentation from Jane Cohan on the project she is working on for the La Villita Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Mayor Mooney requested an item on how to expand our resources to better communicate with our Northgate Bars and Restaurants. Executive Session reconvened at 7:41 p.m. Executive Session recessed at 9:09 p.m. No vote or action was taken in Executive Session. 13. Adjournment. There being no further business, Mayor Mooney adjourned the Meeting of the City Council at 9:10 p.m. on Thursday, September 23, 2021. ________________________ Karl Mooney, Mayor ATTEST: ___________________________ Tanya Smith, City Secretary Page 15 of 310 October 14, 2021 Item No. 7.2. Jones Butler Extension Design Contract Change Order Sponsor:Emily Fisher, Assistant Director of Public Works Reviewed By CBC:City Council Agenda Caption:Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding Change Order No. 1 in the amount of $80,100 to the professional services contract with Kimley Horn and Associates, Inc for the Jones Butler Extension and Roundabout project. Relationship to Strategic Goals: 1. Core Services and Infrastructure 2. Improving Mobility Recommendation(s): Staff recommends approval. Summary: The City of College Station is under contract with Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. for the reconstruction of Jones Butler Road from FM 2818 to Holleman Drive South with a proposed roundabout at this intersection. The project requires a significant amount of water transmission line relocation. During the conceptual design review of the utility portion of the work, staff determined the need for additional design for piping and work internal to the pumping station. Budget & Financial Summary: A combined total budget of $1,812,000 is currently appropriated for these projects in the Streets, Water and Wastewater Capital Improvement Projects Funds. A combined total of $1,293,978 has been expended or committed to date, leaving a combined balance of $518,022 for this change order and future expenses. Attachments: 1.Change Order 1 2.20210811_Jones Butler Roundabout Amendment 1 to Client Agreement Page 16 of 310 CHANGE ORDER NO. 1 DATE: September 1, 2021 Contract No. 20300729 P.O.#- 20205897 PROJECT: Jones Butler Extension and Roundabout Project OWNER:CONTRACTOR: City of College Station Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc P.O. Box 9960 2800 S. Texas Ave, Ste 201 Ph: 979-775-9595 College Station, Texas 77842 Bryan, Texas 77802 Fax: N/A PURPOSE OF THIS CHANGE ORDER: ITEM UNIT ORIGINAL REVISED ADDED NO UNIT DESCRIPTION PRICE QUANTITY QUANTITY COST 1 LS Scope Amendment No. 1 Design Fees $1.00 1284400 1364500 $80,100.00 TOTAL $80,100.00 LINE 1 STREET (41399971-6560)$12,000.00 LINE 2 WATER (WTWOC-6581)$67,800.00 LINE 3 SEWER (SCWOC-6590)$300.00 TOTAL CHANGE ORDER $80,100.00 ORIGINAL CONTRACT AMOUNT $1,284,400.00 CHANGE ORDER NO. 1 $80,100.00 6.2%% CHANGE REVISED CONTRACT AMOUNT $1,364,500.00 6.2%% TOTAL CHANGE APPROVED ______________________________________________________________________________________ A/E CONTRACTOR Date DEPARTMENT DIRECTOR Date _____________________________________________________________________________________ CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTOR Date ASST CITY MGR - CFO Date _____________________________________________________________________________________ PROJECT MANAGER Date CITY ATTORNEY Date _____________________________________________________________________________________ CITY ENGINEER Date CITY MANAGER Date THE NET AFFECT OF THIS CHANGE ORDER IS 6.2%. A. This change order is for additional design services determined to be needed during the conceptual design phase. The services include designs for additional lenghts of distribution and transmission water line yard piping, additional structural vault design, chlorine injection design and associated costs for topographic survey. The change order also includes preparation of easement documents. Page 17 of 310 Rev. 7/18 AMENDMENT NUMBER 1 TO THE AGREEMENT BETWEEN CLIENT AND KIMLEY-HORN AND ASSOCIATES, INC. This is Amendment number 1 dated August 11, 2021 to the agreement between City of College Station ("Client") and Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. ("Consultant") dated September 24, 2020 (“the Agreement") concerning Jones Butler Extension and Roundabout Design Contract (the "Project"). The Consultant has entered into the Agreement with Client for the furnishing of professional services, and the parties now desire to amend the Agreement. The Agreement is amended to include services to be performed by Consultant for compensation as set forth below in accordance with the terms of the Agreement, which are incorporated by reference. Consultant performed the following services out of original scope: Task 1: Conceptual Water and Sewer Line Design  Conceptual Water and Sewer Line Design o Consultant prepared three (3) additional conceptual utility design layouts and OPCCs. o Consultant evaluated an approximately 1,800 additional linear feet of 30-inch, and 12-inch distribution and 30-inch and 36-inch transmission water line yard piping and associated alternates. o Consultant participated in two (2) additional concept review meetings. Consultant will perform the following services based on direction provided by City during Conceptual Design: Task 2: Additional Water and Sewer Line Design  Prepare Preliminary and Final Water and Sewer Line design for the additional infrastructure identified during Conceptual Design, outlined in Task 1. o Prepare (22”x34”) Plan/Profile sheets at 1”=40’ horizontal and 1”=4’ vertical scale. This will include bid alternate sheets for casing pipe across Dowling Road and Jones Butler Road and 12” water line extension along Holleman Drive. o Plan view of the base map shall have all above ground features shown and clearly labeled along the existing property lines, easements and utilities based on field ties and record information. o Plan view shall include design notes for stationing, size, appurtenances (water), manholes (sewer), and horizontal changes in direction. o Profile shall include design notes for stationing, size, slope, flow lines, pipe material, embedment, length, and construction method. o Compile and prepare an updated OPCC, in accordance with AACE standards, for the entire project using recent average unit bid prices which are representative of similar types of construction in the local area.  Final Water and Sewer Line Design (90%) o Incorporate and/or respond to the City’s preliminary design submittal review comments one (1) round of comments anticipated in proposed effort. o Finalize water line design calculations. o Prepare final design plans. o Prepare updated OPCC in accordance with AACE standards. Task 3: Pump Station Meter Improvement Final Design  Perform additional structural vault design for a second cast-in-place vault structure.  Perform additional grading design for a second cast-in-place vault structure. Page 18 of 310 Rev. 7/18 Task 4: Chlorine Injection Design  Meet onsite with Water Services Operations Staff to discuss current disinfection strategy.  Review project record information for existing chlorine gas storage, ejectors, and service water pump station.  Evaluate existing chlorine gas storage, ejectors, and service water pump station capacity.  Conduct one (1) virtual meeting to discuss capacity evaluation findings.  Coordinate with vendors and the City to incorporate additional chlorine analyzer into system.  Prepare a general site plan, general notes and general details sheets adequate to convey the project intent. Details of the equipment will be provided by the vendor.  Prepare technical specifications adequate to implement the project intent.  Prepare an OPCC.  Exclusions o Developing or modifying a CT study. o Scope assumes that the existing system capacity is adequate to add an additional injection point. Designing expansion improvements is not included in this scope of work. Task 5: Topographic Survey  Limits of the survey will be within the fence along the north side of the Dowling Pump Station property.  Prepare a final topographic drawing in digital format (including one-foot contours and breaklines) showing the features located in the field as well as right-of-way strip map information in accordance with the City Mapping Requirements dated May 2010, an ASCII coordinate file of the points located in the field, and a hard copy of the coordinates and feature descriptions. Task 6: Easement Documents  Prepare up to five (5) additional easement instruments based on revised routes associated with alignments outlined in Task 1. For the services set forth above, Client shall pay Consultant the following compensation: Task 1: Conceptual Water and Sewer Line Design $7,100 (Lump Sum) Task 2: Final Water and Sewer Line Design $35,600 (Lump Sum) Task 3: Pump Station Meter Improvement Final Design $5,000 (Lump Sum) Task 4: Chlorine Injection Design $17,900 (Lump Sum) Task 5: Topographic Survey $2,500 (Lump Sum) Task 6: Easement Documents $12,000 (Lump Sum) Total $80,100 (Lump Sum) CLIENT: CONSULTANT: _________________________________ KIMLEY-HORN AND ASSOCIATES, INC. By: ______________________________ By: ________________________________ Title: _____________________________ Title: Vice President Date: _____________________________ Date: ___08/11/21_______________________ Page 19 of 310 October 14, 2021 Item No. 7.3. Hot Mix Asphalt Concrete and Base Failure Contract Sponsor:Pete Caler, Assistant Director of Public Works Reviewed By CBC:City Council Agenda Caption:Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding the first renewal of a contract to Brazos Paving, Inc. for base failure repairs and pavement treatments in an amount not to exceed $4,613,250. This item is for contracted equipment, labor, and materials for standard maintenance activities associated with asphalt streets. Relationship to Strategic Goals: Core Services and Infrastructure Recommendation(s): Staff recommends approving the first renewal of contract 20300745 to Brazos Paving, Inc. for base failure repairs and pavement treatments in an amount not to exceed $4,613,250. Summary: On August 25, 2020, in response to bid #20-067, the City received three competitive sealed bids for base failure repairs and pavement treatments for City of College Station streets. The contract was awarded to the lowest qualified bidder, Brazos Paving, Inc. in an amount not to exceed $4,613,250. This contract term will be for the period beginning October 22, 2021, through October 21, 2022. This is the first of two possible renewals for this contract. Budget & Financial Summary: Funds are budgeted and available in the Roadway Maintenance Fund. Attachments: 1.Signed Renewal #1 For Annual Price Agreement For Base Failure Repairs & Road Reconstruction Treatments Page 20 of 310 Page 21 of 310 Page 22 of 310 October 14, 2021 Item No. 7.4. Greens Prairie Rd Phase 2 Widening Construction Contract Sponsor:Emily Fisher, Assistant Director of Public Works Reviewed By CBC:City Council Agenda Caption:Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding a construction contract with Larry Young Paving, Inc. in the amount of $8,799,523.75 for the Greens Prairie Road Widening Phase 2 project. Relationship to Strategic Goals: 1. Core Services and Infrastructure 2. Improving Mobility Recommendation(s): Staff recommends approval. Summary: This project includes widening the existing two-lane asphalt roadway section into a four- lane concrete minor arterial with medians and multi-use paths from Arrington to Dalton Lane. This includes water and wastewater utilities, fiber optic lines, street lighting and a traffic signal at the intersection of Greens Prairie and Castlegate Drive. Planter boxes will be constructed with the project, and city crews will complete landscaping after construction of the road. Construction is expected to start in December and last 18 months. There were three competitive sealed proposals submitted as part of the bid process. The lowest bid was submitted by Larry Young Paving, Inc. After evaluation, Larry Young Paving, Inc. was rated highest among the submitted proposals. Budget & Financial Summary: Budget in the amount of $11,214,000 is included for this project in the Streets Capital Projects Fund. A total of $1,547,236.03 has been expended or committed to date, leaving a balance of $9,666,763.97 in the total project budget for construction. Attachments: 1.Project Map 2.21-058 Tabulation Page 23 of 310 Page 24 of 310 ITEM QTY UNIT DESCRIPTIONUnit Extended Unit Extended Unit Extended11LSMobilization, construction staking, bonds and insurance as required in the specifications.465,000.00$ 465,000.00$ 588,380.00$ 588,380.00$ 299,000.00$ 299,000.00$ 2 27618 SYMill 2.5" average asphalt pavement and remove 6" stabilized base as shown on plans & specifications and dispose offsite, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work. 6.00 165,708.00 3.45 95,282.10 3.50 96,663.00 3 2377 SYRemove and haul concrete pavement per plans & specifications and dispose offsite, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work. 10.00 23,770.00 28.00 66,556.00 8.50 20,204.50 4 2575 SYRemove sidewalks as shown on plans & specifications and dispose offsite, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.10.00 25,750.00 30.00 77,250.00 8.50 21,887.50 5 2653 LFRemove and haul curb and gutter per plans & specifications and dispose offsite, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work. 8.50 22,550.50 7.80 20,693.40 5.50 14,591.50 6 978 LFRemove miscellaneous culvert pipe as shown on plans & specifications and dispose offsite to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.25.00 24,450.00 22.00 21,516.00 18.50 18,093.00 711SYRemove raised medians as shown on plans & specifications and dispose offsite to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.20.00 220.00 1,250.00 13,750.00 9.25 101.75 824EARemove safety end treatment as shown on plans & specifications and dispose offsite to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.350.00 8,400.00 650.00 15,600.00 270.00 6,480.00 921EARemove signs, posts, and related foundations per plans & specifications and return to the respective owner, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work. 100.00 2,100.00 200.00 4,200.00 100.00 2,100.00 10 6734 LFCap and remove abandoned gas line, including 6" (92 LF), 8" (84 LF), and 10" (6558 LF), to within the ROW per plans & specifications and dispose offsite, or cap and grout where applicable, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work. 20.00 134,680.00 15.00 101,010.00 10.00 67,340.00 11 1 LSRemove and replace flagpole, light assembly, rock and vegetative landscaping (approx. 30 SY including rose bushes and annuals), and irrigation at Castlegate Drive as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work.6,500.00 6,500.00 55,000.00 55,000.00 290.00 290.00 12 1 LSRemove and replace rock/landscaping at Donnington Drive as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.3,500.00 3,500.00 35,000.00 35,000.00 350.00 350.00 13 1 LSRemove landscaping (~13 SY) and wall blocks (~50 LF) near Aggieland Express Car Wash near Arrington Road as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.5,000.00 5,000.00 17,200.00 17,200.00 2,200.00 2,200.00 14 14 EARemove Street Illumination Assembly per plans & specifications and dispose offsite, to include removal of existing conduit, conductor, and foundation and all material, labor and equipment to complete the work. Coordinate with College Station Utilities for removal of pole, mast arm, and luminaire.2,500.00 35,000.00 5,000.00 70,000.00 650.00 9,100.00 15 6797 LFAbandon, cap & grout or remove 4" PVC water line as shown on plans & specifications and dispose offsite, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.20.00 135,940.00 12.00 81,564.00 7.00 47,579.00 16 140 LFAbandon, cap & grout or remove 8" PVC water line as shown on plans & specifications and dispose offsite, to include (49 LF steel casing) all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.30.00 4,200.00 16.00 2,240.00 12.00 1,680.00 17 688 LFAbandon, cap & grout or remove 12" PVC water line as shown on plans & specifications and dispose offsite, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.35.00 24,080.00 18.00 12,384.00 14.00 9,632.00 REMOVALSBrazos Paving, Inc. (Prewitt) Burnside Services, Inc. Larry Young Paving, Inc. GENERAL ITEMSSubtotal: General Items465,000.00$ 588,380.00$ 299,000.00$ 21‐058 Addendum 2 ‐ Page 1Page 25 of 310 ITEM QTY UNIT DESCRIPTIONUnit Extended Unit Extended Unit ExtendedBrazos Paving, Inc. (Prewitt) Burnside Services, Inc. Larry Young Paving, Inc. 18 2 EARemove 12" water valve, as shown on plans & specifications and dispose offsite, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.350.00 700.00 500.00 1,000.00 340.00 680.00 19 466 LFAs needed, remove 3" abandoned PVC water line and dispose offsite, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.20.00 9,320.00 12.00 5,592.00 6.00 2,796.00 20 328 SYRemove gravel driveways as shown on plans & specifications and dispose offsite, to include of material, labor and equipment to complete the work.6.50 2,132.00 4.00 1,312.00 4.00 1,312.00 21 85 EARemove and haul off trees per plans & specifications and dispose offsite, to include clearing and grubbing in vicinity of removals, all material, labor and equipment to complete the work. 650.00 55,250.00 450.00 38,250.00 310.00 26,350.00 22 329 SYClear and grub easement and remove trees as shown on plans & specifications, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.12.50 4,112.50 5.00 1,645.00 9.00 2,961.00 23 109 LFAbandon, cap & grout or remove 6" force main line as shown on plans & specifications and dispose offsite, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.30.00 3,270.00 15.00 1,635.00 10.50 1,144.50 24 16 LFRemove various misc. fence as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.20.00 320.00 10.00 160.00 65.00 1,040.00 25 12062 LFRemove and replace (temporary and permanent) barbed wire fence with steel posts (Type C fence per TxDOT WF(2)-10) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.- 7.00 84,434.00 5.75 69,356.50 26 2 EARemove headwall and wingwalls as shown on plans & specifications and dispose offsite to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.4,000.00 8,000.00 1,500.00 3,000.00 1,500.00 3,000.00 27 1 EARemove Junction Box and Manholes as shown on plans & specifications and dispose offsite to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.2,500.00 2,500.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 810.00 810.00 28 1 EARemove sidewalk drainage trench grate as shown on plans & specifications and dispose offsite to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.350.00 350.00 2,500.00 2,500.00 270.00 270.00 29 5 EARemove inlet as shown on plans & specifications and dispose offsite to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.1,800.00 9,000.00 585.00 2,925.00 810.00 4,050.00 30 3 EARemove mailbox, posts, and concrete foundations per plans & specifications, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work. 150.00 450.00 1,000.00 3,000.00 150.00 450.00 31 1 EARemove Fire Hydrant Assembly, as shown on plans & specifications to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.1,800.00 1,800.00 500.00 500.00 590.00 590.00 32 967 LFRemove miscellaneous storm sewer pipe as shown on plans & specifications and dispose offsite to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.35.00 33,845.00 22.00 21,274.00 17.50 16,922.50 33 16011 CYExcavation (in situ) of material in right-of-way to meet design grades of roadway and temporary paving, including hauling, stockpiling, and disposing of excess, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work. 12.50 200,137.50 10.00 160,110.00 7.25 116,079.75 34 14033 CYHaul in and place select fill material (in situ) for roadway and temporary paving, condition and compact to design standards, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work. 16.00 224,528.00 20.00 280,660.00 8.50 119,280.50 35 43392 SYInstall 10" thick continuously reinforced concrete pavement (CRCP) with monolithic curb, as shown on plans & specifications, including all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work complete in-place.79.30 3,440,985.60 85.00 3,688,320.00 63.00 2,733,696.00 Subtotal: Removals752,898.00$ 857,472.50 450,024.75 ROADWAY & EARTHWORK21‐058 Addendum 2 ‐ Page 2Page 26 of 310 ITEM QTY UNIT DESCRIPTIONUnit Extended Unit Extended Unit ExtendedBrazos Paving, Inc. (Prewitt) Burnside Services, Inc. Larry Young Paving, Inc. 36 50606 SYInstall 8" chemically stabilized and compacted subgrade (4% lime & 3% cement) as shown on plans & specifications, to include proof-rolling, sprinkling, and rolling, all material, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place. (Does not include cost of lime or cement.)3.00 151,818.00 4.10 207,484.60 2.50 126,515.00 37 730 TONLime for stabilization of subgrade.200.00 146,000.00 210.00 153,300.00 170.00 124,100.00 38 547 TONCement for stabilization of subgrade.225.00 123,075.00 235.00 128,545.00 200.00 109,400.00 39 1532 SYInstall 4" thick HMAC, Type D, as shown on plans & specifications, including all material, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.26.25 40,215.00 30.20 46,266.40 23.50 36,002.00 40 1532 SYInstall 6" thick HMAC, Type B, as shown on plans & specifications, including all material, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.38.00 58,216.00 43.70 66,948.40 31.50 48,258.00 41 13593 SYInstall 6" chemically stabilized and compacted subgrade (4% lime & 3% cement) as shown on plans & specifications, to include proof-rolling, sprinkling, and rolling, all material, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place. (Does not include cost of lime or cement.)3.00 40,779.00 3.75 50,973.75 2.75 37,380.75 42 1000 CYAs needed, remove and replace unsuitable soils with select fill to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work. Limits of remove and replace soil to be approved by Engineer prior to initiating work.42.00 42,000.00 19.00 19,000.00 5.00 5,000.00 43 3255 SYInstall raised colored (Butterfield, Integral - Base: U34 Brick Red, Release: R13 Deep Charcoal) and stamped (New Brick Running Bond) concrete including concrete and sub-base as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.126.00 410,130.00 125.00 406,875.00 65.50 213,202.50 44 2543 SYInstall 6" thick concrete intersections as shown on plans & specifications, to include 8" thick chemically stabilized and compacted subgrade (4% lime & 3% cement) and monolithic curb, all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place. To include school and commercial driveways.88.00 223,784.00 98.00 249,214.00 51.00 129,693.00 45 2 EAInstall 8' ADA concrete ramps as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.1,050.00 2,100.00 2,200.00 4,400.00 720.00 1,440.00 46 24 EAInstall 10' ADA concrete ramps as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.1,200.00 28,800.00 2,400.00 57,600.00 830.00 19,920.00 47 3142 SYInstall raised median planter including retaining curb, drainage aggregate, vapor barrier, filter fabric, top soil, and 4" PVC underdrain tied to storm sewer system as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.159.75 501,934.50 110.00 345,620.00 120.00 377,040.00 48 58 SYInstall concrete ribbon median as shown on plans & specifications, to include monolithic curb, all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.85.00 4,930.00 210.00 12,180.00 120.00 6,960.00 49 13 SYInstall concrete median at Dalton Drive as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.85.00 1,105.00 210.00 2,730.00 150.00 1,950.00 50 284 LFInstall typical combined curb & gutter (ST1-01) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.25.00 7,100.00 25.00 7,100.00 30.50 8,662.00 51 200 SYInstall 12" thick flexible base driveway (crushed limestone) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.30.00 6,000.00 25.00 5,000.00 27.50 5,500.00 52 454 SYInstall 6" thick concrete driveways as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.58.50 26,559.00 85.00 38,590.00 55.00 24,970.00 53 13419 SYInstall 6" thick concrete shared use path as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.58.50 785,011.50 78.00 1,046,682.00 41.00 550,179.00 54 174 SYInstall 6" thick concrete shared use path (Special) (Type A) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.58.50 10,179.00 200.00 34,800.00 120.00 20,880.00 55 321 LFInstall pedestrian rail (SW1-01) with black powder coating as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.252.80 81,148.80 221.40 71,069.40 180.00 57,780.00 21‐058 Addendum 2 ‐ Page 3Page 27 of 310 ITEM QTY UNIT DESCRIPTIONUnit Extended Unit Extended Unit ExtendedBrazos Paving, Inc. (Prewitt) Burnside Services, Inc. Larry Young Paving, Inc. 56 2 EAInstall proposed mailbox (MB-S AASM TY)(TWG)(TY4), as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.500.00 1,000.00 395.00 790.00 300.00 600.00 57 1 EAInstall proposed mailbox (MB-D AASM TY)(TWG)(TY4), as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.650.00 650.00 425.00 425.00 310.00 310.00 58 25 CYInstall 6" thick reinforced concrete cap for Explorer Pipeline protection, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.500.00 12,500.00 550.00 13,750.00 750.00 18,750.00 59 23 LFFurnish and Install 10" diameter PVC, with structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.56.00 1,288.00 55.00 1,265.00 46.00 1,058.00 60 2420 LFFurnish and Install 18" diameter reinforced concrete pipe, Class III, with structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.68.00 164,560.00 75.00 181,500.00 67.50 163,350.00 61 504 LFFurnish and Install 18" diameter reinforced concrete pipe, Class IV, with structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.74.50 37,548.00 85.00 42,840.00 78.50 39,564.00 62 2619 LFFurnish and Install 24" diameter reinforced concrete pipe, Class III, with structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.86.00 225,234.00 85.00 222,615.00 71.50 187,258.50 63 63 LFFurnish and Install 24" diameter reinforced concrete pipe, Class IV, with structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.88.50 5,575.50 95.00 5,985.00 80.50 5,071.50 64 579 LFFurnish and Install 3' x 2' reinforced concrete box including rubber gasket joints, with structural backfill as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.375.00 217,125.00 281.00 162,699.00 340.00 196,860.00 65 432 LFFurnish and Install 4' x 2' reinforced concrete box including rubber gasket joints, with structural backfill as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.635.00 274,320.00 300.00 129,600.00 480.00 207,360.00 66 258 LFFurnish and Install 3' x 3' reinforced concrete box culvert including rubber gasket joints, with structural backfill, for culverts as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.550.00 141,900.00 305.00 78,690.00 400.00 103,200.00 67 109 LFFurnish and Install 4' x 2' reinforced concrete box culvert including rubber gasket joints, with structural backfill, for culverts as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.635.00 69,215.00 300.00 32,700.00 480.00 52,320.00 68 7 LFFurnish and Install 5' x 2' reinforced concrete box culvert including rubber gasket joints, with structural backfill, for culverts as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.750.00 5,250.00 410.00 2,870.00 2,200.00 15,400.00 69 102 LFFurnish and Install 6' x 4' reinforced concrete box culvert including rubber gasket joints, with structural backfill, for culverts as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.820.00 83,640.00 585.00 59,670.00 850.00 86,700.00 70 40 EAFurnish and Install 5' curb inlet structures, all depths, including (40) extension(s), ring & cover, and plate, with structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.5,200.00 208,000.00 6,853.00 274,120.00 5,000.00 200,000.00 71 13 EAFurnish and Install 10' full depth curb inlet structures, all depths, including ring & cover, and plate, with structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.6,800.00 88,400.00 8,600.00 111,800.00 5,400.00 70,200.00 72 4 EAFurnish and Install 15' full depth curb inlet structures, all depths, including ring & cover, and plate, with structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.7,500.00 30,000.00 12,900.00 51,600.00 6,800.00 27,200.00 73 1 EAFurnish and Install sidewalk drainage trench as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.2,000.00 2,000.00 2,500.00 2,500.00 3,200.00 3,200.00 DRAINAGESubtotal: Roadway and Earthwork6,570,685.90$ 7,098,433.55$ 4,893,548.50$ 21‐058 Addendum 2 ‐ Page 4Page 28 of 310 ITEM QTY UNIT DESCRIPTIONUnit Extended Unit Extended Unit ExtendedBrazos Paving, Inc. (Prewitt) Burnside Services, Inc. Larry Young Paving, Inc. 74 1 EAFurnish and Install 4' x 4' junction box with structural backfill, all depths, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, ring & cover, plate, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.5,000.00 5,000.00 4,852.00 4,852.00 4,800.00 4,800.00 75 1 EAFurnish and Install 6' x 6' junction box with structural backfill, all depths, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, ring & cover, plate, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.5,600.00 5,600.00 7,820.00 7,820.00 5,100.00 5,100.00 76 2 EAFurnish and Install 24" reinforced concrete pipe 15° bend, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.1,850.00 3,700.00 1,740.00 3,480.00 930.00 1,860.00 77 1 EAFurnish and Install safety end treatment (TY1)(24")(4:1)(P), as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.3,500.00 3,500.00 5,760.00 5,760.00 1,100.00 1,100.00 78 7 EAFurnish and Install concrete headwall with parallel and/or flared wingwall assemblies, all heights, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.10,500.00 73,500.00 19,720.00 138,040.00 12,000.00 84,000.00 79 279 SYFurnish and Install 6" thick concrete riprap as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.72.00 20,088.00 89.00 24,831.00 49.50 13,810.50 80 501 SYFurnish and Install Common Stone Riprap with grout (6"-9") as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.85.00 42,585.00 140.00 70,140.00 110.00 55,110.00 81 3762 LFTrench Safety1.50 5,643.00 1.00 3,762.00 0.75 2,821.50 82 1 LSFile notice of intent and storm water pollution prevention plan with TCEQ, maintain and post all project information and keep records and report to inspector and engineer. Furnish, install, maintain and remove all sediment control devices including inlet protection (996 LF), construction entrance and exits (12 EA), rock filter dams (225 LF), and sediment control fencing (4984 LF).53,878.00$ 53,878.00$ 26,750.00 26,750.00 43,000.00 43,000.00 83 18483 SYHydro mulch disturbed areas including smoothing, 4" topsoil, grading, fertilizer, watering, maintenance and clean-up as shown on plans & specifications, complete in-place.4.70$ 86,870.10$ 5.75 106,277.25 0.50 9,241.50 84 10408 SYBlock sod disturbed areas including smoothing, 4" topsoil, fertilizer, watering, maintenance and clean-up as shown on plans & specifications, complete in-place.9.70$ 100,957.60$ 5.75 59,846.00 4.00 41,632.00 85 1 LSFurnish a licensed arborist and provide tree protection, to include but not limited to: protection fencing (1195 LF), root pruning (140 LF), fertilization (98 GAL), and canopy pruning as shown on plans & specifications and as directed by the Arborist, complete in-place.20,000.00$ 20,000.00$ 28,000.00 28,000.00 15,000.00 15,000.00 86 1LSFurnish and Install and remove all traffic control devices (TCP) to incl: all striping, barricades, temporary signage, cut and restore of pavement, level up, temporary drainage, temporary grading/ditches, temporary water connections, removal pavement markings, and all other temporary facilities required for the TCP as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.96,850.00$ 96,850.00$ 65,000.00$ 65,000.00$ 97,000.00$ 97,000.00$ 87 1240LFFurnish and Install and remove low profile concrete barrier (including 120 LF TY2) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.35.00$ 43,400.00$ 105.00$ 130,200.00$ 42.00$ 52,080.00$ 88 2263 SYInstall 2.5" thick HMAC, Type C or D for temporary detour paving, as shown on plans & specifications, including all material, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.18.00$ 40,734.00$ 125.00$ 282,875.00$ 15.50$ 35,076.50$ 89 2263 SYInstall 6" thick cement stabilized sand base for temporary detour paving, as shown on plans & specifications, including all material, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.30.00$ 67,890.00$ 13.00$ 29,419.00$ 21.00$ 47,523.00$ 90 2263 SYRemove temporary detour paving, as shown on plans & specifications, including all material, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.6.00$ 13,578.00$ 5.00$ 11,315.00$ 4.75$ 10,749.25$ SIGNAGE, PAVEMENT MARKINGS, STRIPING & TCPEROSION CONTROLSubtotal: Erosion Control261,705.70$ 220,873.25$ 108,873.50$ Subtotal: Drainage1,713,671.50$ 1,619,139.00$ 1,527,344.00$ 21‐058 Addendum 2 ‐ Page 5Page 29 of 310 ITEM QTY UNIT DESCRIPTIONUnit Extended Unit Extended Unit ExtendedBrazos Paving, Inc. (Prewitt) Burnside Services, Inc. Larry Young Paving, Inc. 91 1 LSFurnish and Install all reflective pavement markings, sealer, arrows, symbols and surface preparation as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.30,160.00$ 30,160.00$ 60,490.00$ 60,490.00$ 33,000.00$ 33,000.00$ 92 35 EAFurnish and Install all sign assemblies with bronze powder coated posts and triangular slipbase supports as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.615.00$ 21,525.00$ 1,175.00$ 41,125.00$ 530.00$ 18,550.00$ 93 2 EAInstall school zone flasher as shown on plans & specifications, to include safe removal and return of existing flasher assembly & foundation to the City of College Station, all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.9,935.00$ 19,870.00$ 8,829.70$ 17,659.40$ 8,700.00$ 17,400.00$ 94 1 EAFurnish and Install "P" Style NEMA Traffic Cabinet (PT-P44168TS2-1-CS) w/Det. Rack, Loadswitches, EDI Conflict Monitor (MMU-16LEip w/ Ethernet Port) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.16,092.00$ 16,092.00$ 15,911.40$ 15,911.40$ 21,000.00$ 21,000.00$ 95 1 EAFurnish and Install Siemens M60 Nema Linux Controller# 8132-0000-099 (Includes large screen and USB Port) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.3,780.00$ 3,780.00$ 3,639.75$ 3,639.75$ 4,000.00$ 4,000.00$ 96 1 EAFurnish and Install Comnet Managed Ethernet Switch CNGEZOFX4TX16MS w/fiber SFP Modules as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.3,186.00$ 3,186.00$ 2,674.90$ 2,674.90$ 2,800.00$ 2,800.00$ 97 2 EAFurnish and Install 4-Section, 12-inch, LED Signal Head w/Louvered Black Aluminum Backplate (Arr-R, Arr-Y, Arr-Y, Arr-G) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.1,296.00$ 2,592.00$ 953.35$ 1,906.70$ 860.00$ 1,720.00$ 98 6 EAFurnish and Install 3-Section, 12-inch, LED Signal Head w/Louvered Black Aluminum Backplate (R-Y-G) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.1,296.00$ 7,776.00$ 740.60$ 4,443.60$ 730.00$ 4,380.00$ 99 3 EAFurnish and Install Streetscape Signal Pole, 30 ft-long with Luminaire, Bronze, Powder Finished as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.9,612.00$ 28,836.00$ 8,957.35$ 26,872.05$ 8,800.00$ 26,400.00$ 100 3 EAFurnish and Install Streetscape Mast Arm, 48 ft-long, Bronze, Powder Finished Over Galvanized Steel w/Flanged Base as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.12,031.00$ 36,093.00$ 8,588.20$ 25,764.60$ 5,600.00$ 16,800.00$ 101 3 EAFurnish and Install Wind Damper Assembly for each mast arm as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.637.00$ 1,911.00$ 393.20$ 1,179.60$ 850.00$ 2,550.00$ 102 6 EAFurnish and Install 1-Section LED, 16-inch Pedestrian Countdown Signal Head, w/9" Symbol/Man (Black) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.670.00$ 4,020.00$ 514.05$ 3,084.30$ 510.00$ 3,060.00$ 103 6 EAFurnish and Install Astro-Brac Cable Mount Assy (AB-0131-1-Way Ped Assy w/84" Cable) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.219.00$ 1,314.00$ 310.50$ 1,863.00$ 170.00$ 1,020.00$ 104 4 EAFurnish and Install Pedestrian Push-Button Assembly (Polara Brand APS) w/ Educational "Push Button To Cross Street" Sign 9"x15" R10-3eR as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.397.00$ 1,588.00$ 629.05$ 2,516.20$ 730.00$ 2,920.00$ 105 2 EAFurnish and Install Pedestrian Push-Button Assembly (Polara Brand APS) w/ Educational "Push Button To Cross Street" Sign 9"x15" R10-3eL as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.397.00$ 794.00$ 879.75$ 1,759.50$ 730.00$ 1,460.00$ 106 2 EAFurnish and Install 11-ft long Streetscape Pedestal Pole, Bronze, Powder Finished over Galvanized Steel w/ Flanged Base and Pole Collars as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.2,268.00$ 4,536.00$ 1,688.20$ 3,376.40$ 1,700.00$ 3,400.00$ 107 3 EAFurnish and Install ATB2 LED Luminaires, w/8-ft-long Streetscape Support Arms, Bronze as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.907.00$ 2,721.00$ 749.80$ 2,249.40$ 400.00$ 1,200.00$ 108 5 EAFurnish and Install Type D Pull Boxes w/Apron, w/Locking Cover, w/Legend "High Voltage Traffic Signal" as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.1,512.00$ 7,560.00$ 1,040.75$ 5,203.75$ 1,000.00$ 5,000.00$ SIGNALIZATION & ILLUMINATIONSubtotal: SIGNAGE, PAVEMENT MARKINGS, STRIPING & TCP334,007.00$ 638,083.40$ 311,378.75$ 21‐058 Addendum 2 ‐ Page 6Page 30 of 310 ITEM QTY UNIT DESCRIPTIONUnit Extended Unit Extended Unit ExtendedBrazos Paving, Inc. (Prewitt) Burnside Services, Inc. Larry Young Paving, Inc. 109 1 EAFurnish and Install Stainless Steel Meter Pedestal Service, 4-Terminal, 125-am, Twin-Link Connectors, for Direct Burial, including conduit to power source as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.7,020.00$ 7,020.00$ 5,675.25$ 5,675.25$ 5,100.00$ 5,100.00$ 110 1 EAFurnish and Install Peek Model #PB5200-17496 ITS Battery Backup System w/ Ethernet Port, w/ Cabinet and Foundation w/batteries as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.10,692.00$ 10,692.00$ 8,541.05$ 8,541.05$ 7,700.00$ 7,700.00$ 111 1 EAFurnish and Install Concrete Signal Controller Foundation as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.3,132.00$ 3,132.00$ 2,922.15$ 2,922.15$ 1,700.00$ 1,700.00$ 112 39 LFFurnish and Install Signal Pole Foundation, 36-inch Diameter as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.324.00$ 12,636.00$ 328.90$ 12,827.10$ 270.00$ 10,530.00$ 113 12 LFFurnish and Install Signal Pole Foundation, 24-inch Diameter as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.216.00$ 2,592.00$ 157.55$ 1,890.60$ 200.00$ 2,400.00$ 114 260 LFFurnish and Install Conduit, 2"-Diameter, Schedule 40 PVC as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.9.72$ 2,527.20$ 10.24$ 2,662.40$ 14.50$ 3,770.00$ 115 345 LFFurnish and Install Bored Conduit, 2"-Diameter, Schedule 40 PVC as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.18.90$ 6,520.50$ 20.94$ 7,224.30$ 17.00$ 5,865.00$ 116 65 LFFurnish and Install Conduit, 4"-Diameter, Schedule 40 PVC as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.18.90$ 1,228.50$ 11.21$ 728.65$ 21.50$ 1,397.50$ 117 450 LFFurnish and Install Bored Conduit, 4"-Diameter, Schedule 40 PVC as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.24.84$ 11,178.00$ 15.03$ 6,763.50$ 24.50$ 11,025.00$ 118 1221 LFFurnish and Install 7/C #12 AWG Stranded Signal Cable as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.3.78$ 4,615.38$ 2.88$ 3,516.48$ 2.50$ 3,052.50$ 119 905 LFFurnish and Install 5/C #12 AWG Stranded Signal Cable as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.3.15$ 2,850.75$ 2.60$ 2,353.00$ 2.00$ 1,810.00$ 120 555 LFFurnish and Install THHN 3-1/C #12 Luminaire Cable as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.2.48$ 1,376.40$ 2.68$ 1,487.40$ 2.25$ 1,248.75$ 121 15 LFFurnish and Install Bare Electrical Conductor #6 Wire (Stranded) for Grounding as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.2.48$ 37.20$ 1.97$ 29.55$ 2.00$ 30.00$ 122 960 LFFurnish and Install Bare Electrical Conductor #8 Wire (Stranded) for Grounding as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.1.94$ 1,862.40$ 1.97$ 1,891.20$ 1.50$ 1,440.00$ 123 30 LFFurnish and Install Insulated Electrical Conductor #6 Wire (Stranded) for Power as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.2.48$ 74.40$ 2.19$ 65.70$ 1.75$ 52.50$ 124 3 EAFurnish and Install Iteris RZ4A Advanced WDR Camera as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.3,132.00$ 9,396.00$ 2,861.20$ 8,583.60$ 1,500.00$ 4,500.00$ 125 3 EAFurnish and Install Iteris Vantage Edge 2 Processor w/ Video Monitor and AC Surge Panel as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.1,895.00$ 5,685.00$ 1,522.60$ 4,567.80$ 2,800.00$ 8,400.00$ 126 1 EAFurnish and Install Iteris Edge Connect Module as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.3,412.00$ 3,412.00$ 2,917.55$ 2,917.55$ 3,000.00$ 3,000.00$ 127 1 EAFurnish and Install IM BIU Module as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.1,264.00$ 1,264.00$ 1,005.10$ 1,005.10$ 970.00$ 970.00$ 21‐058 Addendum 2 ‐ Page 7Page 31 of 310 ITEM QTY UNIT DESCRIPTIONUnit Extended Unit Extended Unit ExtendedBrazos Paving, Inc. (Prewitt) Burnside Services, Inc. Larry Young Paving, Inc. 128 620 LFFurnish and Install VIVDS Composite 8281 Coax/16 AWG power cable as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.3.78$ 2,343.60$ 449.00$ 278,380.00$ 4.25$ 2,635.00$ 129 1 EAFurnish and Install Pan Tilt Zoom CCTV Camera (Sony SNC-WR632C Network rapid Dome Full HD Camera - W Series) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.8,208.00$ 8,208.00$ 5,385.45$ 5,385.45$ 4,700.00$ 4,700.00$ 130 70 LFFurnish and Install CAT 6 Ethernet Cable as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.3.78$ 264.60$ 1.91$ 133.70$ 2.00$ 140.00$ 131 3 EAFurnish and Install Priority Control System Detector (3M Opticom Model 721) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.1,296.00$ 3,888.00$ 10.07$ 30.21$ 930.00$ 2,790.00$ 132 624 LFFurnish and Install Model 138 Detector Cable (for GTT Opticom Model 721) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.2.48$ 1,547.52$ 2.40$ 1,497.60$ 1.75$ 1,092.00$ 133 1 EAFurnish and Install GTT Model 764 Multimode Phase Selector Card (Infrared) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.4,800.00$ 4,800.00$ 4,732.25$ 4,732.25$ 4,700.00$ 4,700.00$ 134 5 EAFurnish and Install Confirmation Lights w/ Duracell 75 Watt A19 LED bulbs, w/Power Cable as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.316.50$ 1,582.50$ 259.90$ 1,299.50$ 230.00$ 1,150.00$ 135 100 LFFurnish and Install 3/C #14 AWG Tray Cable for Red Light Confirmation as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.2.48$ 248.00$ 2.75$ 275.00$ 2.00$ 200.00$ 136 2 EAFurnish and Install "Left Turn Yield on Flashing Yellow Arrow" sign (36"x42")(R10-17T) on Signal Mast Arm (3M DG3 Material) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.632.00$ 1,264.00$ 420.90$ 841.80$ 370.00$ 740.00$ 137 1 EAFurnish and Install R3-8LR Lane Assignment Sign (36"x30") on Signal Mast Arm (3M DG3 Material) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.632.00$ 632.00$ 401.35$ 401.35$ 410.00$ 410.00$ 138 2 EAFurnish and Install R3-4 No U-turn Sign (36"x36") on Signal Mast Arm (3M DG3 Material) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.632.00$ 1,264.00$ 401.35$ 802.70$ 360.00$ 720.00$ 139 3 EAFurnish and Install Street Name Signs (96"x18", 3M DG3 Material, Per Plans) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.1,895.00$ 5,685.00$ 1,028.10$ 3,084.30$ 440.00$ 1,320.00$ 140 24 EAFurnish and install street light illumination assembly with bronze powder coating as shown on plans & specifications, to include foundation, pole, mast arm, luminaire, and all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.7,800.00$ 187,200.00$ 6,666.55$ 159,997.20$ 6,000.00$ 144,000.00$ 141 2 EAFurnish and install street light controller, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.7,118.00$ 14,236.00$ 5,743.10$ 11,486.20$ 3,200.00$ 6,400.00$ 142 5093 LFFurnish and install 2" Diameter Conduit, Schedule 40 PVC, by open cut, for illumination as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.21.60$ 110,008.80$ 13.39$ 68,195.27$ 13.00$ 66,209.00$ 143 1350 LFFurnish and install 2" Diameter Conduit, Schedule 40 PVC, by bore, for illumination as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.36.20$ 48,870.00$ 22.41$ 30,253.50$ 16.00$ 21,600.00$ 144 170 LFFurnish and install 6" Diameter Conduit, HDPE, by bore, with 2-2" PVC conduits for illumination as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.69.10$ 11,747.00$ 48.30$ 8,211.00$ 26.50$ 4,505.00$ 145 131 LFFurnish and Install 8" diameter DR14 C-900 PVC water pipe by open cut with restrained joints and structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, testing, disinfection, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.48.00$ 6,288.00$ 48.00$ 6,288.00$ 92.00$ 12,052.00$ WATERSubtotal: Signalization & Illumination614,687.75$ 753,104.56$ 435,012.25$ 21‐058 Addendum 2 ‐ Page 8Page 32 of 310 ITEM QTY UNIT DESCRIPTIONUnit Extended Unit Extended Unit ExtendedBrazos Paving, Inc. (Prewitt) Burnside Services, Inc. Larry Young Paving, Inc. 146 13 LFFurnish and Install 8" diameter DR14 C-900 PVC water pipe by open cut with non-structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, testing, disinfection, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.42.00$ 546.00$ 40.00$ 520.00$ 56.50$ 734.50$ 147 591 LFFurnish and Install 12" diameter DR14 C-900 PVC water pipe by open cut with restrained joints and structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, testing, disinfection, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.72.00$ 42,552.00$ 80.00$ 47,280.00$ 170.00$ 100,470.00$ 148 135 LFFurnish and Install 12" diameter DR14 C-900 PVC water pipe by open cut with restrained joints and non-structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, testing, disinfection, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.64.00$ 8,640.00$ 75.00$ 10,125.00$ 120.00$ 16,200.00$ 149 119 LFFurnish and install 16" steel casing, 3/8" thick, (excluding carrier pipe) as shown on plans & specifications, to include spacers, neoprene seal, and all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.225.00$ 26,775.00$ 200.00$ 23,800.00$ 180.00$ 21,420.00$ 150 128 LFFurnish and install 20" steel casing, 3/8" thick, (excluding carrier pipe) as shown on plans & specifications, to include spacers, neoprene seal, and all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.265.00$ 33,920.00$ 220.00$ 28,160.00$ 190.00$ 24,320.00$ 151 4 EAFurnish and Install 8"- 45° MJ Bend with thrust blocking as shown on plans & specifications to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.650.00$ 2,600.00$ 350.00$ 1,400.00$ 610.00$ 2,440.00$ 152 11 EAFurnish and Install 12"- 45° MJ Bend with thrust blocking as shown on plans & specifications to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.750.00$ 8,250.00$ 750.00$ 8,250.00$ 1,100.00$ 12,100.00$ 153 1 EAFurnish and Install 12"x12" MJ Tee with thrust blocking as shown on plans & specifications to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.900.00$ 900.00$ 1,100.00$ 1,100.00$ 1,600.00$ 1,600.00$ 154 1 EAFurnish and Install 8" MJ Gate Valve and box with thrust blocking, as shown on plans & specifications to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.2,100.00$ 2,100.00$ 2,800.00$ 2,800.00$ 1,800.00$ 1,800.00$ 155 5 EAFurnish and Install 12" MJ Gate Valve and box with thrust blocking, as shown on plans & specifications to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.4,800.00$ 24,000.00$ 5,200.00$ 26,000.00$ 3,200.00$ 16,000.00$ 156 2 EAFurnish and Install 1" diameter short service line with tap including relocating meter box as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.3,500.00$ 7,000.00$ 2,800.00$ 5,600.00$ 1,400.00$ 2,800.00$ 157 870 LFTrench Safety1.50$ 1,305.00$ 1.00$ 870.00$ 4.75$ 4,132.50$ 158 1 EAFurnish and Install Fire Hydrant assembly as shown on plans & specifications, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.5,200.00$ 5,200.00$ 5,800.00$ 5,800.00$ 5,900.00$ 5,900.00$ 159 2 EARelocate air release valve as shown on plans & specifications, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.3,600.00$ 7,200.00$ 2,200.00$ 4,400.00$ 2,600.00$ 5,200.00$ 160 100 CYAs needed, rock cut for utility installation to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.65.00$ 6,500.00$ 93.00$ 9,300.00$ 120.00$ 12,000.00$ 161 7 EAConnect to existing waterline, all sizes, as shown on plans & specifications to include all required fittings, adapters, etc., all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.6,850.00$ 47,950.00$ 1,500.00$ 10,500.00$ 2,100.00$ 14,700.00$ 162 94 LFFurnish and Install 6" diameter SDR-26-D2241 PVC sewer force main pipe by open cut with restrained joints and structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.36.00$ 3,384.00$ 42.00$ 3,948.00$ 75.50$ 7,097.00$ 163 23 LFFurnish and Install 6" diameter SDR-26-D2241 PVC sewer force main pipe by open cut with non-structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.32.00$ 736.00$ 40.00$ 920.00$ 44.50$ 1,023.50$ FORCE MAINSubtotal: Water231,726.00$ 192,193.00$ 253,869.00$ 21‐058 Addendum 2 ‐ Page 9Page 33 of 310 ITEM QTY UNIT DESCRIPTIONUnit Extended Unit Extended Unit ExtendedBrazos Paving, Inc. (Prewitt) Burnside Services, Inc. Larry Young Paving, Inc. 164 85 LFFurnish and install 14" steel casing, 3/8" thick, (excluding carrier pipe) as shown on plans & specifications, to include spacers, neoprene seal, and all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.200.00$ 17,000.00$ 180.00$ 15,300.00$ 170.00$ 14,450.00$ 165 4 EAFurnish and Install 6"- 45° MJ Bend with thrust blocking as shown on plans & specifications to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.600.00$ 2,400.00$ 250.00$ 1,000.00$ 560.00$ 2,240.00$ 166 1 LSFurnish and provide all by-pass pumping during the installation of the force main system including temporary fittings, plugs, boots, and wet well pumping. To include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.8,500.00$ 8,500.00$ 20,000.00$ 20,000.00$ 2,900.00$ 2,900.00$ 167 117 LFTrench Safety2.50$ 292.50$ 1.00$ 117.00$ 4.75$ 555.75$ 168 2 EAConnect to existing 6" force main as shown on plans & specifications to include all required fittings, adapters, etc., all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.1,250.00$ 2,500.00$ 1,500.00$ 3,000.00$ 1,400.00$ 2,800.00$ 169 24 LFFurnish and Install 8" diameter DR14 C-900 PVC water pipe by bore, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, testing, disinfection, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.58.00$ 1,392.00$ 148.00$ 3,552.00$ 96.50$ 2,316.00$ 170 50 LFFurnish and Install 8" diameter DR14 C-900 PVC water pipe by open cut with structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, testing, disinfection, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.48.00$ 2,400.00$ 44.00$ 2,200.00$ 83.50$ 4,175.00$ 171 83 LFFurnish and Install 8" diameter DR14 C-900 PVC water pipe by open cut with non-structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, testing, disinfection, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.42.00$ 3,486.00$ 40.00$ 3,320.00$ 53.00$ 4,399.00$ 172 70 LFFurnish and Install 12" diameter DR14 C-900 PVC water pipe by open cut with restrained joints and structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, testing, disinfection, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.68.00$ 4,760.00$ 80.00$ 5,600.00$ 160.00$ 11,200.00$ 173 246 LFFurnish and Install 12" diameter DR14 C-900 PVC water pipe by open cut with non-structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, testing, disinfection, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.62.00$ 15,252.00$ 75.00$ 18,450.00$ 120.00$ 29,520.00$ 174 23 LFFurnish and install 20" steel casing, 3/8" thick, (excluding carrier pipe) as shown on plans & specifications, to include spacers, neoprene seal, and all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.500.00$ 11,500.00$ 220.00$ 5,060.00$ 190.00$ 4,370.00$ 175 2 EAFurnish and Install 8"- 45° MJ Bend with thrust blocking as shown on plans & specifications to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.650.00$ 1,300.00$ 350.00$ 700.00$ 620.00$ 1,240.00$ 176 6 EAFurnish and Install 12"- 45° MJ Bend with thrust blocking as shown on plans & specifications to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.850.00$ 5,100.00$ 750.00$ 4,500.00$ 1,100.00$ 6,600.00$ 177 1 EAFurnish and Install 12" x 8" eccentric reducer as shown on plans & specifications to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.750.00$ 750.00$ 750.00$ 750.00$ 810.00$ 810.00$ 178 1 EAFurnish and Install 8" MJ Gate Valve and box with thrust blocking, as shown on plans & specifications to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.2,100.00$ 2,100.00$ 2,800.00$ 2,800.00$ 1,800.00$ 1,800.00$ 179 20 LFRemove 10" abandoned gas line as shown on plans & specifications, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.25.00$ 500.00$ 25.00$ 500.00$ 17.50$ 350.00$ 180 2 EARemove exist blowoff as shown on plans & specifications, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.650.00$ 1,300.00$ 550.00$ 1,100.00$ 350.00$ 700.00$ 181 316 LFTrench Safety1.50$ 474.00$ 1.00$ 316.00$ 4.75$ 1,501.00$ 182 2 EAConnect to existing waterline, all sizes, as shown on plans & specifications to include all required fittings, adapters, etc., all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.2,850.00$ 5,700.00$ 1,500.00$ 3,000.00$ 2,100.00$ 4,200.00$ SWEETWATER FOREST WATERLINE EXTENSIONSubtotal: Sweetwater Forest Waterline Extension56,014.00$ 51,848.00$ 73,181.00$ Subtotal: Force Main34,812.50$ 44,285.00$ 31,066.25$ 21‐058 Addendum 2 ‐ Page 10Page 34 of 310 ITEM QTY UNIT DESCRIPTIONUnit Extended Unit Extended Unit ExtendedBrazos Paving, Inc. (Prewitt) Burnside Services, Inc. Larry Young Paving, Inc. 183 22 LFFurnish and install 2" Diameter Conduit, HDPE, by open cut, as shown on plans & specifications, to include polyester fiber pull tape (1800 psi tensile strength), 10 AWG insulated tracer wire, 6" orange warning tape, route marker signs, all shoring (if needed), native soil compaction, trench safety, and all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.29.15$ 641.30$ 6.19$ 136.18$ 27.00$ 594.00$ 184 1544 LFFurnish and install 2" Diameter Conduit, HDPE, by directional bore, as shown on plans & specifications, to include polyester fiber pull tape (1800 psi tensile strength), 10 AWG insulated tracer wire, route marker signs, bore pits, and all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.28.60$ 44,158.40$ 16.68$ 25,753.92$ 21.50$ 33,196.00$ 185 1520 LFFurnish and install 4" Diameter Conduit, Schedule 40 PVC, by open cut, with 4-1" innerducts with low friction as shown on plans & specifications, to include polyester fiber pull tape (1800 psi tensile strength) in each innerduct, 10 AWG insulated tracer wire, 6" orange warning tape, route marker signs, all shoring (if needed), native soil compaction, trench safety, and all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.42.65$ 64,828.00$ 33.35$ 50,692.00$ 33.00$ 50,160.00$ 186 1867 LFFurnish and install 4" Diameter Conduit, Bore Gard, by directional bore, with 4-1" innerducts with low friction as shown on plans & specifications, to include polyester fiber pull tape (1800 psi tensile strength) in each innerduct, 10 AWG insulated tracer wire, route marker signs, bore pits, and all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.71.30$ 133,117.10$ 35.90$ 67,025.30$ 35.50$ 66,278.50$ 187 6653 LFInstall fiber optic cable, to be provided by the City, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials necessary for installation, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.1.60$ 10,644.80$ 2.21$ 14,703.13$ 0.50$ 3,326.50$ 188 17 EAFurnish and install 30" x 48" x 30" communications pull box (Type 1) with lid flush to grade as shown on plans & specifications, to include 6" of pea size gravel, 8' ground rod, ground testing to 25 ohm or less, snake pit tracer box, tracer wire connection, and all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.3,663.00$ 62,271.00$ 4,876.00$ 82,892.00$ 3,300.00$ 56,100.00$ 189 6 EARemove and haul off trees per plans & specifications and dispose offsite, to include clearing and grubbing in vicinity of removals, all material, labor and equipment to complete the work. 1,200.00$ 7,200.00$ 250.00$ 1,500.00$ 390.00$ 2,340.00$ 190 670 SYClear and grub easement and remove trees as shown on plans & specifications, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.3.50$ 2,345.00$ 4.50$ 3,015.00$ 9.00$ 6,030.00$ 191 233 LFRemove 16" PVC water line as shown on plans & specifications and dispose offsite, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.25.00$ 5,825.00$ 113.00$ 26,329.00$ 9.50$ 2,213.50$ 192 277 CYExcavation (in situ) of material in right-of-way to meet design grades of roadway and temporary paving, including hauling, stockpiling, and disposing of excess, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work. 12.50$ 3,462.50$ 15.00$ 4,155.00$ 5.25$ 1,454.25$ 193 287 SYInstall 10" thick continuously reinforced concrete pavement (CRCP) with monolithic curb, as shown on plans & specifications, including all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work complete in-place.79.30$ 22,759.10$ 85.00$ 24,395.00$ 68.50$ 19,659.50$ 194 287 SYInstall 8" chemically stabilized and compacted subgrade (4% lime & 3% cement) as shown on plans & specifications, to include proof-rolling, sprinkling, and rolling, all material, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place. (Does not include cost of lime or cement.)3.00$ 861.00$ 4.25$ 1,219.75$ 2.50$ 717.50$ 195 3 TONLime for stabilization of subgrade.200.00$ 680.00$ 210.00$ 714.00$ 170.00$ 578.00$ 196 3 TONCement for stabilization of subgrade.225.00$ 585.00$ 235.00$ 611.00$ 200.00$ 520.00$ 197 418 SYInstall 6" thick concrete intersections as shown on plans & specifications, to include 8" thick chemically stabilized and compacted subgrade (4% lime & 3% cement) and monolithic curb, all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place. To include school and commercial driveways.110.00$ 45,980.00$ 89.00$ 37,202.00$ 51.00$ 21,318.00$ 198 2 EAInstall 8' ADA concrete ramps as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.1,050.00$ 2,100.00$ 1,800.00$ 3,600.00$ 710.00$ 1,420.00$ 199 14 SYInstall raised colored (Butterfield, Integral - Base: U34 Brick Red, Release: R13 Deep Charcoal) and stamped (New Brick Running Bond) concrete including concrete and sub-base as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.126.00$ 1,764.00$ 125.00$ 1,750.00$ 64.00$ 896.00$ 200 11 LFFurnish and Install 18" diameter reinforced concrete pipe, Class IV, with structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.74.50$ 819.50$ 75.00$ 825.00$ 85.00$ 935.00$ DIAMONDBACK INTERSECTIONFIBER CONDUIT BANKSubtotal: Fiber Conduit Bank315,660.60$ 241,202.53$ 209,655.00$ 21‐058 Addendum 2 ‐ Page 11Page 35 of 310 ITEM QTY UNIT DESCRIPTIONUnit Extended Unit Extended Unit ExtendedBrazos Paving, Inc. (Prewitt) Burnside Services, Inc. Larry Young Paving, Inc. 201 368 LFFurnish and Install 8" (W) (SLD) reflective pavement marking (TY I), sealer, and surface preparation as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.1.65$ 607.20$ 1.35$ 496.80$ 1.75$ 644.00$ 202 164 LFFurnish and Install 24" (W) (SLD) reflective pavement marking (TY I), sealer, and surface preparation as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.6.50$ 1,066.00$ 5.30$ 869.20$ 7.00$ 1,148.00$ 203 19 EAFurnish and Install TY II-C-R reflective pavement marker as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.4.30$ 81.70$ 5.10$ 96.90$ 4.75$ 90.25$ 204 3 EAFurnish and Install (W) (ARROW) reflective pavement marking (TY I), sealer, and surface preparation as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.167.40$ 502.20$ 135.00$ 405.00$ 180.00$ 540.00$ 205 3 EAFurnish and Install (W) (WORD) reflective pavement marking (TY I), sealer, and surface preparation as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.189.00$ 567.00$ 140.00$ 420.00$ 210.00$ 630.00$ 206 4 EAFurnish and Install Type 3 post mounted barricade as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.1,620.00$ 6,480.00$ 980.00$ 3,920.00$ 1,800.00$ 7,200.00$ 207 1 EAFurnish and Install 4-Section, 12-inch, LED Signal Head w/Louvered Black Aluminum Backplate (Arr-R, Arr-Y, Arr-Y, Arr-G) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.1,296.00$ 1,296.00$ 953.35$ 953.35$ 800.00$ 800.00$ 208 1 EAFurnish and Install Streetscape Signal Pole, 30 ft-long with Luminaire, Bronze, Powder Finished as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.9,612.00$ 9,612.00$ 8,957.35$ 8,957.35$ 8,800.00$ 8,800.00$ 209 2 EAFurnish and Install 1-Section LED, 16-inch Pedestrian Countdown Signal Head, w/9" Symbol/Man (Black) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.670.00$ 1,340.00$ 48.30$ 96.60$ 560.00$ 1,120.00$ 210 2 EAFurnish and Install Astro-Brac Cable Mount Assy (AB-0131-1-Way Ped Assy w/84" Cable) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.220.00$ 440.00$ 310.50$ 621.00$ 220.00$ 440.00$ 211 1 EAFurnish and Install Pedestrian Push-Button Assembly (Polara Brand APS) w/ Educational "Push Button To Cross Street" Sign 9"x15" R10-3eR as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.397.00$ 397.00$ 779.70$ 779.70$ 620.00$ 620.00$ 212 1 EAFurnish and Install Pedestrian Push-Button Assembly (Polara Brand APS) w/ Educational "Push Button To Cross Street" Sign 9"x15" R10-3eL as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.397.00$ 397.00$ 779.70$ 779.70$ 680.00$ 680.00$ 213 1 EAFurnish and Install 11-ft long Streetscape Pedestal Pole, Bronze, Powder Finished over Galvanized Steel w/ Flanged Base and Pole Collars as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.2,268.00$ 2,268.00$ 1,688.20$ 1,688.20$ 1,700.00$ 1,700.00$ 214 1 EAFurnish and Install ATB2 LED Luminaires, w/8-ft-long Streetscape Support Arms, Bronze as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.907.00$ 907.00$ 749.80$ 749.80$ 400.00$ 400.00$ 215 13 LFFurnish and Install Signal Pole Foundation, 36-inch Diameter as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.324.00$ 4,212.00$ 328.90$ 4,275.70$ 270.00$ 3,510.00$ 216 6 LFFurnish and Install Signal Pole Foundation, 24-inch Diameter as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.216.00$ 1,296.00$ 157.55$ 945.30$ 210.00$ 1,260.00$ 217 25 LFFurnish and Install Conduit, 2"-Diameter, Schedule 40 PVC as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.9.72$ 243.00$ 821.00$ 20,525.00$ 14.50$ 362.50$ 218 5 LFFurnish and Install Conduit, 4"-Diameter, Schedule 40 PVC as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.18.90$ 94.50$ 821.00$ 4,105.00$ 24.50$ 122.50$ 219 108 LFFurnish and Install 7/C #12 AWG Stranded Signal Cable as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.3.78$ 408.24$ 2.88$ 311.04$ 2.75$ 297.00$ 220 460 LFFurnish and Install 5/C #12 AWG Stranded Signal Cable as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.3.15$ 1,449.00$ 3.60$ 1,656.00$ 2.00$ 920.00$ 221 175 LFFurnish and Install THHN 3-1/C #12 Luminaire Cable as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.2.48$ 434.00$ 2.68$ 469.00$ 2.00$ 350.00$ 222 30 LFFurnish and Install Bare Electrical Conductor #8 Wire (Stranded) for Grounding as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.1.94$ 58.20$ 1.97$ 59.10$ 2.00$ 60.00$ 21‐058 Addendum 2 ‐ Page 12Page 36 of 310 ITEM QTY UNIT DESCRIPTIONUnit Extended Unit Extended Unit ExtendedBrazos Paving, Inc. (Prewitt) Burnside Services, Inc. Larry Young Paving, Inc. 223 1 EAFurnish and Install Confirmation Lights w/ Duracell 75 Watt A19 LED bulbs, w/Power Cable as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.316.00$ 316.00$ 361.10$ 361.10$ 283.00$ 283.00$ 224 20 LFFurnish and Install 3/C #14 AWG Tray Cable for Red Light Confirmation as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.2.48$ 49.60$ 2.75$ 55.00$ 1.75$ 35.00$ 225 1 EAFurnish and Install "Left Turn Yield on Flashing Yellow Arrow" sign (36"x42")(R10-17T) on Signal Mast Arm (3M DG3 Material) as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, labor, and equipment to complete the work, complete and in place.632.00$ 632.00$ 385.25$ 385.25$ 370.00$ 370.00$ 226 241 LFFurnish and Install 16" diameter DR14 C-905 PVC water pipe by open cut with restrained joints and structural backfill, as shown on plans & specifications, to include all materials, testing, disinfection, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.92.00$ 22,172.00$ 111.00$ 26,751.00$ 230.00$ 55,430.00$ 227 92 LFFurnish and install 24" steel casing, 3/8" thick, (excluding carrier pipe) as shown on plans & specifications, to include spacers, neoprene seal, and all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work, complete in-place.280.00$ 25,760.00$ 250.00$ 23,000.00$ 210.00$ 19,320.00$ 228 4 EAFurnish and Install 16"- 45° MJ Bend with thrust blocking as shown on plans & specifications to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.1,800.00$ 7,200.00$ 1,500.00$ 6,000.00$ 2,300.00$ 9,200.00$ 229 1 EAFurnish and Install 16" MJ Gate Valve and box with thrust blocking, as shown on plans & specifications to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.7,800.00$ 7,800.00$ 12,400.00$ 12,400.00$ 10,000.00$ 10,000.00$ 230 241 LFTrench Safety1.50$ 361.50$ 1.00$ 241.00$ 4.75$ 1,144.75$ 231 2 EAConnect to existing waterline, all sizes, as shown on plans & specifications to include all required fittings, adapters, etc., all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.1,600.00$ 3,200.00$ 1,500.00$ 3,000.00$ 2,800.00$ 5,600.00$ 232 1 EARelocate air release valve as shown on plans & specifications, to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.3,600.00$ 3,600.00$ 1,500.00$ 1,500.00$ 2,900.00$ 2,900.00$ 233 100 CYAs needed, rock cut for utility installation to include all material, labor and equipment to complete the work.65.00$ 6,500.00$ 100.00$ 10,000.00$ 120.00$ 12,000.00$ 234 256 LFFurnish and install tree protection fence as shown on plans & specifications and as directed by the Arborist, complete in-place.6.00$ 1,536.00$ 10.00$ 2,560.00$ 2.00$ 512.00$ A1 43679 SYInstall 10" thick jointed reinforced concrete pavement (JRCP) with monolithic curb as shown on plans & specifications, including all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work complete and in-place.70.20 3,066,265.80 85.00 3,712,715.00 56.00 2,446,024.00 A2 -43679 SYSubtract: Items 35 and 193 "Install 10" thick continuously reinforced concrete pavement (CRCP) with monolithic curb, as shown on plans & specifications, including all materials, labor and equipment to complete the work complete in-place."79.30 (3,463,744.70) 85.00 (3,712,715.00) 63.00 (2,751,777.00) Total Base Bid + Bid Alternate 1 11,161,054.29 12,549,763.63 8,493,770.75 ALTERNATE 1 BID ITEMS - JRCPTotal - Bid Alternate 1 (A1+A2=)(397,478.90) - (305,753.00) Total Base Bid11,558,533.19$ 12,549,763.63$ 8,799,523.75$ Subtotal: Diamondback Intersection207,664.24$ 244,748.84$ 206,570.75$ 21‐058 Addendum 2 ‐ Page 13Page 37 of 310 October 14, 2021 Item No. 7.5. Fleet Upgrades Construction Contract Sponsor:Emily Fisher, Assistant Director of Public Works Reviewed By CBC:City Council Agenda Caption:Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding a construction contract with Jacody Construction, LP in the amount of $278,521.79 for the Fleet Upgrades - Oil Pit and Storm Drain project. Relationship to Strategic Goals: 1. Core Services and Infrastructure Recommendation(s): Staff recommends approval. Summary: This project includes improvements to the Fleet Services Oil Service Pit and the abandonment and installation of new sanitary sewer serving Fleet Services and the Public Works wash rack. The project was bid via sealed bid proposal in July 2021, bid # 21-060. One (1) sealed bid was submitted. After evaluation, the sole offeror offered the best value for the city based on the published selection criteria. The base bid was accepted. The project is proposed to begin in November of 2021 and is contracted to take 60 days to complete. Budget & Financial Summary: Budget in the amount of $330,000 is included in the General Government Capital Improvement Projects Fund. A total of $47,275 has been expended or committed to date, leaving a balance of $282,725 for this contract and related costs. Attachments: 1.21-060 Tab 2.Project Location Page 38 of 310 City of College Station - Purchasing Division Bid Tabulation for #21-056 "Fleet Upgrades: Oil Pit and Sorm Drain Project" Open Date: Tuesday, August 3, 2021 @ 2:00 p.m. ITEM QTY UNIT DESCRIPTION UNIT PRICE TOTAL PRICE GENERAL 1 1 LS Mobilization and Bonds $6,406.79 $6,406.79 2 1 LS Erosion Control Plan (Including Hydromulching)$3,572.50 $3,572.50 ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE 3 1LSOil/Water Separator and Installation complete and in place $30,000.00 $30,000.00 SANITARY SEWER 4 225 LF Remove Existing Sanitary Sewer Line $43.75 $9,843.75 5 2 EA Demo Existing Tree $937.50 $1,875.00 6 44 SY Demo Concrete $78.75 $3,465.00 7 130 SY Demo Asphalt $78.75 $10,237.50 8 611 SY Remove, Stockpile and Reuse Base $43.75 $26,731.25 9 2 EA Demo 4' Dia. Manhole $1,125.00 $2,250.00 10 44 SY 6" Concrete Pavement w/ stabilization, Complete In Place $135.00 $5,940.00 11 130 SY Asphalt Pavement, Complete In Place $25.00 $3,250.00 12 225 LF 6" PVC SDR 26 ASTM D3034 Sewer Line, Complete In Place $75.00 $16,875.00 13 375 LF 8" PVC SDR 26 ASTM D3034 Sewer Line, Complete In Place $87.50 $32,812.50 14 1 EA Standard 4' Dia. Manhole, Complete In Place $3,781.25 $3,781.25 15 1EAStandard 4' Dia. Manhole, with external drop connections, Complete In Place $5,987.50 $5,987.50 16 1 EA Standard 5' Dia. Doghouse Manhole, Complete In Place $7,431.25 $7,431.25 17 1 EA Plug Ex Manhole Connection $112.50 $112.50 18 1 EA Reconnect Existing Services to 4' Dia. MH, Complete In Place $668.75 $668.75 19 1 EA Connect to Existing 4' Dia. Manhole, Complete In Place $668.75 $668.75 20 372 LF Grout Fill Existing 6" Sanitary Sewer (Abandon In Place)$12.50 $4,650.00 OIL SERVICE PIT 21 1 LS Installation of Waterproofing, Complete In Place $18,750.00 $18,750.00 22 1LSReplacement and Installation of Service Pit Cover (Motorized Cover), Complete In Place $53,750.00 $53,750.00 23 1LSElectrical Modifications (Motorized Cover), Complete In Place $1,132.50 $1,132.50 24 1 LS Electrical Modifications (Lighting/Pump), Complete In Place $4,780.00 $4,780.00 25 1 LS Oil Pan System Modifications, Complete In Place $11,050.00 $11,050.00 26 1LSNew Sump Pump, Pipe, Fittings, Grate, and Pump Controller, Complete In Place $12,500.00 $12,500.00 Bid certification Addendum Knowledgement Bid Bond Y Y Y SUB TOTAL-ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE SUB TOTAL - SANITARY SEWER $30,000.00 $136,580.00 $9,979.29 $101,962.50 $278,521.79 Jacody Construction, LP SUB TOTAL-GENERAL SUB TOTAL - OIL SERVICE PIT TOTAL BASE BID - ALL ITEMS Page 1 of 1 Page 39 of 310 Project LocationPublic Works Service Facility300 William King Cole Rd.Page 40 of 310 October 14, 2021 Item No. 7.6. Costco Infrastructure Agreement Sponsor:Natalie Ruiz, Director of Economic Development Reviewed By CBC:City Council Agenda Caption:Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding an ordinance approving a participation agreement by and between the City, Costco Wholesale Corporation and RSR Construction Company for the development of certain public infrastructure including a detention pond and authorization of public funds in the amount of $1,239,660 for property generally located near the intersection of Earl Rudder Freeway and Corporate Drive in the Midtown Business Park. Relationship to Strategic Goals: Diverse & Growing Economy Recommendation(s): Staff recommends approval of the ordinance and participation agreement. Summary: In April 2021, the City entered into Costco a real estate contract and economic development agreement with Costco to develop a new facility at the City-owned Midtown Business Park. Costco will purchase approximately 19 acres, construct a new 160,000 square foot facility and construct required infrastructure on and off site. The shared infrastructure will serve the Costco property as well as the remaining 28 developable acres owned by the City. The grand total estimated for shared infrastructure is $2,161,765. Costco will be responsible for approximately $1,172,107, and the City of College Station will be responsible for approximately $989,660. Given the uncertainty in the construction industry, an additional contingency of $250,000 is proposed at the discretion of the City Manager. The infrastructure agreement outlines the following participation levels: Detention Pond - the total cost of the detention pond is estimated at $634,159. The cost share calculation is based upon the amount of acreage served by the regional pond. The City is responsible for 61%, and Costco is responsible for 39%. Storm Sewer Pipe - the total cost of the storm sewer pipe that connects the City's 28-acre tract under the parking lot and into the detention pond is approximately $659,702. The cost share calculation is based upon the amount entering the storm pipes from the respective properties. The City is responsible for 58%, and Costco is responsible for 42%. Site Grading - grading along the City-owned property and Costco's northernmost property line is approximately $149,787. This grading is necessary to collect the runoff from the City's 28- acre tract and direct it to the new storm sewer. Costco is responsible for 100% of site grading. Water Line - the total cost of the 12" water line on Costco's northern property line is $327,160. The cost share calculation is 16% City and 84% Costco. The 12" water line will serve both property owned by Costco and the City. Deceleration Lane & Shared Main Entrance - Costco and the City (as owners of the remaining 28 acres) will share the costs of installing a required deceleration lane on State Highway 6 and Page 41 of 310 a primary entrance to both sites. Total costs are approximately $293,933. The City is responsible for 50%, and Costco is responsible for 50%. Budget & Financial Summary: The agreement provides for a maximum City participation of $1,239,660. Proceeds from the sale of the property to Costco will be escrowed at closing to fund the City’s portion of the infrastructure. Attachments: 1.Participation Agreement-Available in City Secretary's Office 2.Ordinance Page 42 of 310 1. Participation Agreement – Available in City Secretary’s Office Page 43 of 310 ORDINANCE NO._______________ AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS, APPROVING A PARTICIPATION AGREEMENT BY AND BETWEEN THE CITY, COSTCO WHOLESALE CORPORATION AND RSR CONSTRUCTION COMPANY FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF CERTAIN PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE AND AUTHORIZING THE EXPENDITURE OF PUBLIC FUNDS. WHEREAS, Costco Wholesale Corporation (“Costco”) is a developer developing a retail general merchandise facility in the City of College Station, Texas (“City”); and WHEREAS, as part of said development, the construction of certain public infrastructure, including a detention facility, is required; and WHEREAS, pursuant to Section 212.071 et seq. Texas Local Government Code the City of College Station and the Costco have agreed to jointly participate in the construction of certain public infrastructure including a detention facility serving tracts to be owned separately by Costco and by the City as shown in the Participation Agreement found in Exhibit “A” attached hereto and made a part hereof (“Participation Agreement”); now, therefore, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS: PART 1: That the facts and recitations set forth in the preamble of this Ordinance are declared true and correct. PART 2: That the City Council of the City hereby finds it to be in the best interests of its citizens to enter into that one certain Participation Agreement with Costco and Costco’s contractor for the construction of certain public infrastructure including a detention facility as set forth in said Participation Agreement. A copy of the Participation Agreement is attached as Exhibit “A” and incorporated herein by reference. PART 3: That the City Council hereby approves the contract with Costco and Costco’s contractor obligating the City to pay a maximum of $1,239,660 (does not include fixed fee or cost of insurance & bonds) out of a total estimated amount of $2,411,766 (does not include fixed fee or cost of insurance & bonds) for the labor, materials and equipment required for the construction of the public infrastructure, including a detention facility, as described in the Participation Agreement. PART 4: That this Ordinance shall take effect immediately from and after its passage. Page 44 of 310 ADOPTED this __ day of _____________ 2020. ATTEST: APPROVED: City Secretary MAYOR APPROVED: City Attorney Page 45 of 310 October 14, 2021 Item No. 7.7. Costco Reciprocal Easement & Shared Use Agreement Sponsor:Natalie Ruiz, Director of Economic Development Reviewed By CBC:City Council Agenda Caption:Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding a reciprocal easement and shared use agreement with Costco Wholesale Corporation for property generally located near the intersection of Earl Rudder Freeway and Corporate Drive in the Midtown Business Park. Relationship to Strategic Goals: Diverse & Growing Economy Recommendation(s): Staff recommend approval of the reciprocal easement and shared use agreement. Summary: The purpose of this agreement is to provide detail as to how the commercial property owners within this block of Midtown will work together during development and beyond. Specific items include long-term maintenance, operations, and uses typically found within a class A retail center. The major points of the agreement include: The agreement grants property owners temporary and permanent licenses to construct and maintain shared infrastructure. Costco will construct all shared infrastructure. The long-term maintenance of the shared detention pond will be the responsibility of the owner of the adjacent 28 acre tract, currently the City of College Station. If that tract is sold, the responsibilities outlined in this agreement will transfer to the new owner. The long-term maintenance of the shared drive from State Highway 6 will be the responsibility of Costco. Owners agree to preclude nuisance uses such as heavy industrial operations, adult-oriented uses, obnoxious odors, loud noises and debris. Owners agree that specific uses be located 250’ away from the Costco tract to minimize conflicts such as entertainment uses, theaters, health clubs larger than 5,000 square feet and single family homes or condominiums. National entertainment uses such as Dave and Buster’s and Main Event are exempt from this requirement. Owners agree that specific uses be located 300’ away from the Costco tract to minimize conflicts such as churches and educational facilities that could impact Costco’s ability to sell alcohol. Budget & Financial Summary: The City of College Station will be responsible for the maintenance of the shared detention pond as long as we maintain ownership of the 18 acres. Attachments: 1.Reciprocal Easement and Shared Use Agreement-Available in the City Secretary's Office Page 46 of 310 1. Reciprocal Easement and Shared Use Agreement – Available in City Secretary’s Office Page 47 of 310 October 14, 2021 Item No. 7.8. Costco Declaration of Restrictive Covenants Sponsor:Natalie Ruiz, Director of Economic Development Reviewed By CBC:City Council Agenda Caption:Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding a Declaration of Restrictive Covenants by and between the City of College Station and Costco Wholesale Corporation for property generally located near the intersection of Earl Rudder Freeway and Corporate Drive in the Midtown Business Park. Relationship to Strategic Goals: Diverse & Growing Economy Recommendation(s): Staff recommend Council approve the Declaration of Restrictive Covenants. Summary: The purpose of this agreement is to outline land use restrictions on the larger 57 acres of developable property including non-compete language for future development. This agreement is necessary since the City of College Station is the current owner of the Costco property and the adjacent tract that will be developed commercially. The terms of this agreement provide that in exchange for the Costco development, competitive users will not be allowed on the remaining property. This non-compete language is very standard in commercial development. Per the restrictive covenants, the adjacent City-owned tract may NOT be used for: similar wholesale warehouse retailer; large grocery store or supercenter (specialty grocer under 20,000 square feet, such as a Trader Joe's or Whole Foods, is allowed); alcoholic beverage retailer; Walmart or Walmart Super Center; and car wash, motor vehicle service or fueling. These land use restrictions will remain in place as long as Costco continues to remain in operation. Budget & Financial Summary: N/A Attachments: 1.Declaration of Restrictive Covenants-Available in the City Secretary's Office Page 48 of 310 1. Declaration of Restrictive Covenants – Available in City Secretary’s Office Page 49 of 310 October 14, 2021 Item No. 7.9. City of Bryan Retail Electric Franchise Sponsor:Brian Piscacek, Assistant to the City Manager Reviewed By CBC:City Council Agenda Caption:Presentation, discussion, and possible action on the second reading of a ten (10) year franchise agreement with the City of Bryan for retail sale of electricity within the City of College Station as certificated to Bryan by the Public Utility Commission of Texas. Relationship to Strategic Goals: Good Governance Financial Sustainability Core Services & Infrastructure Recommendation(s): Staff recommends approval of the first reading of a ten (10) year franchise agreement with the City of Bryan that allows for use of public rights-of-way for the retail sale of electricity within the City of College Station as certificated to Bryan by the Public Utility Commission of Texas. Summary: This Electric Power Franchise gives the City of Bryan the right to use public rights-of-way within specified areas of College Station in order to provide retail electric service to areas certificated to Bryan by the Public Utility Commission of Texas. This Franchise is for a period of ten (10) years and succeeds a previous agreement executed by both City Councils in October 2010. The proposed Franchise defines such things as payments, utility construction and maintenance, conditions of right-of-way occupancy, street lighting, underground installations, records and reporting, insurance requirements, compliance and many other tangential issues associated with a franchise of this type. One important note is that this franchise only applies to areas defined as “Non-Core” areas within the City of College Station – areas that currently have Bryan electric power facilities within College Station. The update includes minor changes to align with BTU's current line extension policy. City of College Station staff consulted with staff from the City of Bryan and BTU. This agreement was presented to the BTU Board of Directors on September 13, 2021, and approved by the City of Bryan City Council on September 14, 2021. The item was presented to and approved by the College Station City Council on September 23, 2021, on the first reading of the franchise agreement. Section 105 of the City Charter states that “The City of College Station shall have the power by ordinance to grant any franchise or right mentioned in the preceding sections hereof, which ordinance, however, shall not be passed finally until it shall have been read at two (2) separate regular meetings of the City Council.” Budget & Financial Summary: The City of Bryan agrees to pay College Station a sum of money equal to five percent (5%) of annual "Gross Receipts" (as defined therein) from its retail sales to electric customers served within the City of College Station. This percentage remains unchanged from the previous agreement. These payments will be made quarterly. Page 50 of 310 Attachments: 1.BTU_Franchise_FINAL_(8-26-2021) Page 51 of 310 1 ORDINANCE NO. __________. AN ORDINANCE GRANTING TO THE CITY OF BRYAN, TEXAS, A TEXAS MUNICIPAL CORPORATION (“BRYAN”) CERTIFICATED TO PROVIDE RETAIL ELECTRIC UTILITY SERVICE BY THE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION OF TEXAS (“PUC”), ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS, AN ELECTRIC POWER FRANCHISE THAT EXTENDS TO SPECIFIED AREAS WITHIN THE CORPORATE LIMITS OF THE CITY OF COLLEGE STATION (“COLLEGE STATION”), TO USE THE PRESENT AND FUTURE STREETS, AVENUES, ALLEYS, ROADS, HIGHWAYS, SIDEWALKS, PUBLIC UTILITY EASEMENTS AND OTHER PUBLIC RIGHTS OF WAY (COLLECTIVELY “ROW”) IN THE SPECIFIED AREAS OF COLLEGE STATION FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF ITS ELECTRIC SYSTEM FOR A PERIOD OF TEN (10) YEARS; REGULATING THE USE OF THE RIGHTS OF WAY BY BRYAN AND THE REPAIR AND RESTORATION OF STREETS DISTURBED BY CONSTRUCTION; PROVIDING FOR THE TEMPORARY REMOVAL, RAISING AND LOWERING OF CABLES AND OTHER EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL; PROVIDING FOR COMPENSATION TO BE PAID TO COLLEGE STATION; PROVIDING THAT THIS FRANCHISE SHALL NOT BE EXCLUSIVE; PROVIDING A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; RESERVING ALL POWERS OF REGULATION; MAKING MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS RELATIVE TO THIS GRANT OF FRANCHISE; PROVIDING FOR ACCEPTANCE BY BRYAN; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. WHEREAS, Bryan is now and has been engaged in the electric utility business in the State of Texas and in furtherance thereof, has erected and maintained certain items of its physical plant in College Station pursuant to such rights as may have been granted it by and under the laws of the State of Texas, and subject to the reasonable exercise of the police powers granted by and under said laws to College Station; and WHEREAS, it is hereby found and determined by the City Council of College Station that it is in the best interest of College Station that a franchise be awarded to Bryan stating the agreement between Bryan and College Station under which Bryan may use the ROW as defined above to maintain and construct its physical plant in College Station; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS THAT: Section 1. DEFINITIONS. For the purpose of this Ordinance the following terms, phrases, words, abbreviations and their derivations shall have the meaning given herein. When not inconsistent with the context, words used in the present tense include the future tense, words in the plural number include the singular number, and words in the singular number include the plural number. The word “shall” is always mandatory, and not merely directory. A. “Anniversary Date” shall mean the date on which this Franchise is accepted by Bryan. B. “Bryan” shall mean the City of Bryan, Texas, a home-rule municipal corporation that owns and operates a municipal electric utility system, d/b/a “Bryan Texas Utilities”. C. “College Station” shall mean the City of College Station, Texas, a home-rule municipal corporation and includes the territory that currently is or may in the future be included within the boundaries of the City of College Station DocuSign Envelope ID: 97529F74-CF21-4E92-BF30-81903AE4E11B Page 52 of 310 2 D. “Consumer” shall mean any Person receiving and using electric utility service from Bryan for that Person’s own appliances or equipment within College Station whether or not the Electricity is billed directly to that Person or to another party. (As an example, in the case of a rental unit where the cost of utilities is part of the rent, the landlord is a Customer and the tenant is a Consumer.) E. “Core Areas” shall mean all areas within the Corporate Limits of College Station other than areas defined as Non-Core Areas. Core Areas are defined by the boundaries as set forth in Attachment “A” to this document. F. “Corporate Limits” shall mean the corporate limits of the City of College Station, Texas, as they may exist from time to time. References to areas “within College Station” or “in College Station” mean and refer to locations within the corporate limits of College Station. G. “Council” means the governing body of College Station. H. “Customer” means any Person billed by Bryan for Electricity or service delivered within the Corporate Limits of College Station, whether such Electricity or service is used by that Person or by others. I. “Director” means the director of the Department of the College Station city government having jurisdiction and responsibility for engineering and establishing standards for construction on and repair of city streets. J. “Electricity” shall mean energy (kWh) and power (kW) provided by Bryan. K. “Electric System” shall mean Bryan’s system of cables, wires, lines, poles, towers, anchors, guy wires, insulators, transformers, conduits, ducts, and any associated equipment, or plant, or other facilities designed and constructed for distributing Electricity at 60,000 volts or less, or associated communications facilities or systems used solely in conjunction with Bryan’s electric facilities as described herein as the same now exists and may from time to time be placed, removed, constructed, reconstructed, extended and maintained. Nothing in this Ordinance shall authorize Bryan to provide retail electric utility service to electric consuming facilities located within the area that College Station is solely authorized to provide retail electric utility service by the Public Utility Commission of Texas. L. “Force Majeure” shall mean, without limitation by the following enumeration, acts of God and the public enemy, the elements, fire, accidents, breakdowns, shut-down for purposes of necessary repairs, relocation or construction of facilities, breakage or accidents to machinery or distribution lines, the necessity of making repairs or alterations to machinery or to transmission or distribution lines, inability to obtain materials, supplies, permits, or labor to perform or comply with any obligation or condition of this Franchise, and any other events, occurrences or conditions that the person claiming an event of Force Majeure could not, by the exercise of due diligence, have avoided or prevented, and which by the exercise of due diligence has been unable to overcome or cure. M. “Franchise” and “Ordinance” shall mean this ordinance, and all rights and obligations established herein, as it may be amended from time to time. N. “Gross Receipts” shall mean the annual receipts collected by Bryan from its Customers or Consumers for the retail sale of Electricity and the provision of any other electric utility DocuSign Envelope ID: 97529F74-CF21-4E92-BF30-81903AE4E11B Page 53 of 310 3 services or charges to Consumers and Customers, exclusive of the sale of merchandise and/or any sales tax within the Corporate Limits of College Station. Gross Receipts shall include but not be limited to franchise fees collected from Bryan’s Customers or Consumers located within College Station. Gross Receipts shall not include revenues from wholesale sales of Electricity or wholesale transmission revenues; revenues uncollectable from Customers (i.e. bad debts) with billing addresses in the City that was previously included in Gross Receipts; all monies received from the lease or sale of real or personal property; any amounts billed or collected from Customers for refundable deposits; any amounts received by Bryan for contributions in aid of construction (CIAC); reimbursements for damage to or relocation of any part of the Electric System; pole attachment revenue; and State or Federal grants or reimbursements. O. “Non-Core Areas” shall mean all territory within College Station lying west and south of FM 2818 and extending east from FM 2818 at State Highway 6 to Carter Creek as shown in Attachment A. P. “Person” shall include, unless otherwise required in context, a natural person, a legal entity or other group or organization. Q. “Pole Use Agreement” means the standard agreement approved by Bryan and College Station pursuant to the Agreement for Common Use of Distribution Poles and Transmission Structures between Bryan and College Station and used to control the manner in which any apparatus, line or cable is attached by one party to electric poles or similar equipment owned by the other party. R. “Public Utility Commission of Texas” or “PUC” shall mean that agency as presently constituted by the laws of the State of Texas or any successor agency. S. “Public Utility Easement” shall mean those easements held, owned or controlled by College Station, the terms and conditions of which or limitations upon which are not inconsistent with the construction, maintenance and operation of electric utility facilities. T. “Rights of Way” or “ROW” shall mean the present and future Streets, Sidewalks, and Public Utility Easements that permit electric utility service uses or other public right of way of College Station. U. “Sidewalk” shall mean a paved area within the street right-of-way or sidewalk easement specifically designed for pedestrians and/or bicyclists. V. “Streets” shall mean a street, alley, avenue, road, highway or other publicly dedicated or maintained right-of-way, a portion of which is open to use by the public for vehicular travel. Section 2. GRANT OF AUTHORITY. Subject to the terms, conditions and provisions of this Ordinance, the right, privilege and franchise is hereby extended and granted to Bryan, to use ROW of College Station as necessary for all uses associated with the provision or termination of electric utility service including the construction, reconstruction, upgrade, maintenance, repair, replacement, relocation and operation of its Electric System including associated communications facilities and systems, in accordance with the terms of this Franchise, within College Station’s Non-Core Area Corporate Limits as the same are now and as the same may be from time DocuSign Envelope ID: 97529F74-CF21-4E92-BF30-81903AE4E11B Page 54 of 310 4 to time extended. The rights, privilege and franchise granted hereunder are non-exclusive and are granted subject to the existing charter and ordinances of College Station, and are subject to such lawful changes by charter provision or ordinance as may be necessary to the public health and safety by College Station in the exercise of its lawful police powers. The Parties recognize that Bryan has for many years owned, operated and maintained an Electric System in College Station. Nothing in this Franchise is intended to limit or shall limit Bryan’s rights to use easements now or hereafter held, owned or controlled by Bryan for such purposes. Bryan shall have the right to lease, license or otherwise grant to a party other than Bryan the use of its facilities within College Station’s Rights-of-Way, provided that prior to the date of the initial attachment of the facilities of a new lessee, licensee, or user to Bryan’s facilities, Bryan shall notify College Station of the name of the lessee, licensee, or user, the type of service(s) intended to be provided through the facilities, and the name and telephone number of a contact person associated with such lessee, licensee, or user. This authority to lease facilities within the Rights-of-Way shall not affect any such lessee, licensee, or user’s obligation, if any, to also obtain permits and other required regulatory approval from College Station and to pay franchise fees or any other applicable fees to College Station. Not included in the Franchise granted herein are any facilities (including any equipment attached in any way to Bryan’s facilities, whether owned by Bryan or not) that provide data delivery, cable service, telephone service, and/or any other service or product unrelated to Bryan’s transmittal and delivery of electricity. Except for Bryan Electric System facilities as defined and authorized by this Franchise, any other facilities, including but not limited to, data delivery, cable service, telephone service, and/or any other service or product, shall be subject to applicable franchise agreements that cover such facilities or activities in College Station ROW. COLLEGE STATION MAKES NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY NATURE THAT ITS EXISTING OR FUTURE RIGHTS OF WAY WERE, ARE, OR WILL BE SUFFICIENT TO PERMIT THE ATTACHMENT, INSTALLATION, MAINTENANCE, REPLACEMENT, RELOCATION, REPAIR, MODIFICATION OR REMOVAL OF THE ELECTRIC SYSTEM. Section 3. TERM OF FRANCHISE. Upon the filing with College Station by Bryan of the acceptance required herein, this Franchise shall be in full force and effect for a term and period of ten (10) years, beginning on the Anniversary Date, unless terminated as provided herein. This Franchise may be amended only upon mutual agreement by the Parties, which amendment will not be effective until reduced to writing and executed by both Parties. Section 4. CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF ELECTRIC SYSTEM. Bryan may construct and re-construct its Electric System facilities that are necessary facilities for the distribution of Electricity within College Station’s Non-Core Area ROW. All poles to be placed shall be so set that they will not unreasonably interfere with the flow of water in any gutter or drain, and so located that the same will interfere as little as practicable with the ordinary travel on the Streets or Sidewalks, and so as not to unreasonably obstruct visibility at public street intersections. Bryan shall determine the appropriate route for all lines. The location of all poles, stubs, guys, anchors, conduits and cables placed and constructed and to be placed and constructed by Bryan in the construction and maintenance of its Electric System in College Station, and the location of all conduits laid and to be laid by DocuSign Envelope ID: 97529F74-CF21-4E92-BF30-81903AE4E11B Page 55 of 310 5 Bryan within the limits of College Station pursuant to this Franchise shall be subject to lawful, reasonable and proper regulation of general applicability within the City. Bryan will give reasonable consideration to requests by College Station to relocate underground any of its aerial facilities or place new facilities underground. Where available and where feasible to do so along the route chosen by Bryan, Bryan shall use College Station electrical poles for any expansions, additions or extensions of lines in the Electric System in College Station, and College Station will endeavor to do the same. In such instances the Pole Use Agreement will determine how such expansion, additions, or extensions will be accomplished. Nothing contained in this Ordinance shall be construed to require any pole attachments for electric light or power wires or electrical facilities or systems not provided by Bryan, or any non-electric wires, facilities or systems, to be attached to Bryan’s poles or other physical plant. Nothing herein shall prohibit Bryan from requiring reasonable, non-discriminatory terms and from charging just compensation pursuant to a Pole Use Agreement. College Station shall look solely to Bryan for Bryan to enforce all applicable rules, regulations, laws, ordinances, and codes with regards to any Bryan Pole Use Agreement, third-party licensees on Bryan poles or Bryan infrastructure located in College Station ROW. College Station shall not sell, lease or otherwise make available any rights granted by Bryan to College Station to use Bryan’s facilities to any third party. Such rights are provided solely for the non- commercial, governmental use by College Station. Section 5. CONDITIONS OF OCCUPANCY. A. Use. All structures, poles, and facilities erected or maintained by Bryan on ROW within College Station shall be located so as not to cause unreasonable interference with the use of the Streets and with the rights of the owners or occupiers of property which adjoins any of such Streets. B. Construction and Restoration. Except as provided in this Franchise, Bryan shall comply with Chapter 34 of the Code of Ordinances of College Station, Article IV, Utility Right- of-Way Use. This Franchise gives Bryan the right to continued use and occupancy of ROW for the purpose of constructing, reconstructing, repairing, maintaining, using and operating facilities for the distribution of Electricity together with all necessary or desirable appurtenances. College Station hereby waives prior non-compliance by Bryan, if any, with Chapter 34 of the Code of Ordinances of College Station, Article IV. Pursuant to Chapter 34 of the Code of Ordinances of College Station Article IV Section 34-168 insurance and bonding requirements are met by Section 7 of this Franchise. Additionally, with regard to Chapter 34 Article IV Section 34.139, College Station agrees that state law requires College Station to pay for relocation of electric utility facilities made at the request of the City to the extent such facilities are located in easements or other property held, owned or controlled by the electric utility. Pursuant to Chapter 34 of the Code of Ordinances of College Station Article IV Section 34-139, the Parties agree that in lieu of the prescribed ninety (90) days to relocate facilities, a different schedule will apply as follows: College Station and Bryan will mutually agree to a project timetable for relocation of Bryan electric facilities and Bryan agrees to relocate all identified electric facilities according to the project timetable; provided, however, that, in the event the Parties are unable to mutually agree to a project timetable, those identified facilities will be deemed abandoned no earlier than two (2) years from the date notice is received by Bryan and College Station may remove the facilities without liability and charge the cost of the removal to Bryan. Notice will be given no earlier than at the time of completion of the final design of the project requiring relocation. Bryan will submit all plans of record for electric facilities in College DocuSign Envelope ID: 97529F74-CF21-4E92-BF30-81903AE4E11B Page 56 of 310 6 Station right of way to the College Station Electric Utilities Department for filing. Bryan agrees that all such electric facilities in College Station right of way will comply with standards of the National Electric Safety Code (NESC), latest edition for new construction, at the time the facilities are constructed. College Station finds that this franchise adequately replaces the requirement for registration and permitting as shown in the Code of Ordinances of College Station Chapter 34 Article IV. C. Pursuant to the College Station’s police power authority, this right-of-way ordinance may be superseded by a new or amended ordinance, which shall be of general application to all users of College Station rights-of-way. College Station also agrees that College Station will not tamper with, disable or remove any of Bryan’s facilities without prior permission from Bryan except as provided above. College Station reserves the right to request that idle facilities that are not in use and useful be removed unless Bryan can establish the need for such facilities. D. Relocation of Facilities in Private Easements. Bryan may make claims, including claims for actual and reasonable costs or damages, in the event College Station requires or requests Bryan to move, relocate, change, alter, or modify any of its property constructed in easements or on other property held, owned or controlled by Bryan. College Station shall include a description of the facilities, location, desired place of relocation and request an estimate of the costs for relocation. Bryan shall provide to College Station an estimate of the costs of relocation within forty-five (45) days. If College Station requests Bryan to relocate its facilities, then, to the extent Bryan’s facilities were constructed in easements or on property held, owned or controlled by Bryan, College Station shall pay within thirty (30) days of invoice Bryan’s estimate of costs. Notwithstanding the foregoing, College Station will not be liable for consequential damages. E. Relocation of Facilities for the Benefit of Third Parties. If College Station shall require Bryan to adapt or conform its facilities, or in any way or manner to alter, relocate, or change its property to enable any other Person, except College Station, to use, or to use with greater convenience, any ROW Bryan shall not be bound to make such changes until such other Person shall reimburse or make satisfactory arrangements for reimbursement to Bryan for any loss and expense caused by or arising out of such change. College Station shall not be liable for such reimbursement. F. Temporary Raising or Lowering of Wire for Building Moving. Upon written request of any Person holding a building moving permit issued by College Station, Bryan shall raise, or lower its wires and cables temporarily to permit the moving of houses, buildings or other bulky structures. The reasonable expense of such temporary raising or lowering shall be paid by the benefited person, and Bryan may require such payment in advance, Bryan being without obligation to raise, or lower its wires and cables until such payment shall has been made. Bryan shall be given not less than seventy-two (72) hours advance written notice to arrange for such temporary wire and cable adjustments. G. Tree Trimming. College Station may, from time to time, pass ordinances regulating the trimming or removal of trees on or along College Station property, however, reasonable tree trimming and vegetation control shall be allowed. H. Placement of Fixtures. Bryan shall not place poles, towers or similar fixtures where the same will unduly interfere with any existing gas, electric, or telephone fixture, water hydrant or main, drainage facility or sanitary sewer, and all such poles, towers and similar DocuSign Envelope ID: 97529F74-CF21-4E92-BF30-81903AE4E11B Page 57 of 310 7 facilities shall be placed in such manner as not to unreasonably interfere with the usual travel or use of the streets. I. Street Lights. Bryan shall provide electric service to standard or decorative street lights within Bryan’s PUC certificated area in College Station. Unmetered street lighting will be installed, operated and maintained by Bryan. Bryan will establish a monthly cost for each light which includes installation of a standard design, operation and maintenance costs. College Station will approve requests for the installation of street lighting. Bryan shall have the authority to approve or deny developer requests to install new types of decorative lights that are not included on Bryan’s pre-approved streetlight list. J. Traffic Signals. Bryan shall provide space on existing facilities and those to be constructed in Public Utility Easements for College Station to attach traffic signals. If the facilities require an upgrade to accommodate College Station’s request for traffic signals, College Station may elect to either construct its own traffic signal facilities or to reimburse Bryan for the difference in cost to make the necessary upgrades to Bryan’s facilities. College Station shall pay for electricity necessary to operate the traffic signals in accordance with Bryan’s tariff for such services. Section 6. UNDERGROUND INSTALLATION. If the undergrounding of utilities is required by Article 8.3.S. of College Station’s Unified Development Ordinance, as amended, College Station may, or the property developer shall, bear the cost of the furnishing and installing all conduit, pulling vaults, trenching, backfill, boring, special backfill as required, or other civic work to accommodate the required design of BTU facilities. BTU will furnish and install the electrical conductor and devices. Contribution in Aid of Construction (CIAC) for these extensions shall be paid as provided in Bryan’s BTU Electric Line Extension Policy, as amended. Section 7. LIABILITY INSURANCE. A. Minimum Coverage. Within thirty (30) days after the effective date of this Franchise, Bryan shall file with the Director and shall maintain throughout the term of this Franchise a policy of comprehensive general insurance, including an endorsement for contractual liability, issued by an insurance company duly authorized to do business in the State of Texas insuring College Station and Bryan with respect to the installation, maintenance, and operation of Bryan’s Electric System. The amounts designated herein are minimum requirements and do not establish the limits of the Bryan’s liability: (1) Comprehensive General Liability: One Million Dollars ($1,000,000.00) combined single limit per occurrence for bodily injury, personal injury and property damage. (2) Automobile Liability: One Million Dollars ($1,000,000.00) combined signal limit per accident for bodily injury and property damage. (3) Worker’s Compensation and Employers Liability: Workers’ Compensation limits statutory for the State of Texas and Employers Liability limits of One Million Dollars ($1,000,000.00) per accident. (4) Excess and Umbrella Liability Insurance in a form following the underlying coverages in an amount of One Million Dollars ($1,000,000.00) each occurrence and one Million Dollars ($1,000,000.00) aggregate. DocuSign Envelope ID: 97529F74-CF21-4E92-BF30-81903AE4E11B Page 58 of 310 8 B. Notice of Cancellation or Reduction. Such liability insurance shall contain the provision that written notice of expiration, cancellation, reduction or material change in coverage of the policy shall be delivered to the Director and to Bryan at least thirty (30) days in advance of the effective date thereof. C. Term. Such liability insurance shall be kept in full force and effect by Bryan during the existence of this Franchise. Section 8. GOVERNING LAW; LIMITATIONS; COMPLIANCE. A. Governing Law. This Ordinance shall be construed in accordance with College Station’s Charter and Code of Ordinances in effect on the Effective Date of this Ordinance to the extent that such Charter and Code of Ordinances are not in conflict with or in violation of the Constitution and laws of the United States or the State of Texas. B. Limitations: This Ordinance shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of the State of Texas. Should either party desire to pursue any claim or cause of action against the other relating to this Ordinance, notwithstanding any provisions of any law, the party desiring to assert such claim or cause of action must do so in a form with appropriate jurisdiction within four (4) years of the date that such claim or cause of action first arose or said claim or cause of action shall be forever barred. C. Compliance. Notwithstanding any other provision of this Franchise to the contrary, College Station and Bryan shall at all times comply with all laws, rules and regulations of the state and federal government and any administrative agencies thereof, with respect to the subject matter of this Ordinance. Nothing herein shall be deemed a waiver, release or relinquishment of either party’s right to contest, appeal, or file suit with respect to any action or decision of the other party, including ordinances adopted by College Station that Bryan believes are contrary to applicable laws. Section 9. PAYMENT TO COLLEGE STATION. A. In consideration for the rights and privileges herein granted, the administration of this Franchise by College Station, the temporary interference with the use of public rights of way and other costs and obligations undertaken by College Station herein, Bryan hereby agrees to pay to College Station during the term of this Franchise a sum of money equal to five percent (5%) of annual Gross Receipts as herein defined. Franchise fee payments shall be paid quarterly on or before each May 1, August 1, November 1, and February 1 for the most recently ended calendar quarter. Bryan shall file with College Station’s City Manager within thirty (30) days after the expiration of each quarter of each calendar year, or portion thereof during which this Franchise is in effect, a statement showing in reasonable detail the Gross Receipts collected during the preceding quarter of the calendar year. Such statement shall be accompanied by Bryan’s payment to College Station of five percent (5%) of the Gross Receipts for such quarter. An interest charge shall be assessed on a franchise fee payment not paid on the due date at the rate of ten percent (10%) per year for each day that the franchise fee payment is late, and check for the interest due shall accompany the late franchise payment. B. If Bryan elects or is required to provide customer choice pursuant to the terms of the Public Utility Regulatory Act, the fee due under this Franchise shall be based on the following: DocuSign Envelope ID: 97529F74-CF21-4E92-BF30-81903AE4E11B Page 59 of 310 9 (1) each kilowatt hour of Electricity delivered by Bryan to each retail customer whose consuming facility’s point of delivery is located within College Station’s Corporate Limits. The charge imposed shall be equal to the total electric franchise fee revenue due College Station under this Franchise for the calendar year preceding Bryan’s decision to provide customer choice divided by the total kilowatt hours delivered during that calendar year by Bryan to retail customers whose consuming facilities’ points of delivery were located within College Station’s Corporate Limits. The fee due to College Station from Bryan as the provider of distribution service shall be equal to the charge per kilowatt hour determined for the calendar year preceding Bryan’s decision to provide customer choice multiplied times the number of kilowatt hours delivered within College Station’s Corporate Limits; and (2) a sum equal to five percent (5%) of gross revenues received by Bryan from Discretionary Service Charges that are for the benefit of an end-use retail electric consumer within Bryan’s certificated area located within College Station’s Corporate Limits. Discretionary Service Charges shall include but not be limited to: connection charges, disconnection charges, reconnection charges, meter testing charges, out-of-cycle meter read charges, non- standard meter installation charges, service call charges, outdoor lighting charges, tampering charges, denial of access charges, distributed renewal generation metering charges, and construction services. Bryan shall make payment to College Station accompanied by a statement filed with College Station’s City Manager within thirty (30) days after the expiration of each quarter of each calendar year, or portion thereof during which this Franchise is in effect. The statement shall show in reasonable detail the basis for the payment. An interest charge shall be assessed on a franchise fee payment not paid on the due date at the rate of ten percent (10%) per year for each day that the franchise fee payment is late, and check for the interest due shall accompany the late franchise payment. C. The consideration set forth in this section shall be paid and received in lieu of any other license, charge, fee, street or alley rental, or other character of charge for use and occupancy of the Streets, Sidewalks, Public Utility Easements, and other public rights of way of College Station and in lieu of any pole tax, inspection fee tax or other tax, any lawful permit, inspection or other fee whether charged to Bryan or any of its contractors; and any imposition other than the usual general ad valorem taxes, special assessments to abutting landowners or sales taxes now or hereafter lawfully levied. Section 10. RECORDS AND REPORTS. A. Book of Account. Bryan shall keep complete and accurate books of accounts and records of its business and operations from which Gross Receipts may be determined. To the extent practicable, copies of relevant portions of such books of accounts and records shall be made available at Bryan’s office nearest to College Station upon reasonable request. B. Access by College Station. The Director or his duly designated officers, agents, or representatives, shall have access to all books of accounts and records of Bryan relating to this Franchise as reasonably needed to determine the accuracy of any and all reports relating to Bryan’s receipts to College Station. Any confidential or proprietary matters disclosed to College Station shall be held in confidence and disclosed only as needed to enforce College Station’s rights under this Ordinance. Section 11. AREA OF COLLEGE STATION AFFECTED. A. This Franchise shall extend to and include any and all territory that is within Non-Core Areas of College Station. This Franchise shall not apply to Core Areas of College Station. DocuSign Envelope ID: 97529F74-CF21-4E92-BF30-81903AE4E11B Page 60 of 310 10 Bryan may operate, maintain, repair, replace, reconstruct or upgrade Bryan’s existing Electric Facilities in the ROW of Core Areas. B. This Franchise is not intended to and does not enlarge the scope or geographical extent of certification to provide retail service beyond the area certificated to Bryan in the absence of this Franchise. C. Additionally, this Franchise shall extend to any and all territory which is annexed by College Station during the term of this Franchise. In the event of disannexation, this Franchise shall be reduced to the territory that continues to be in College Station. D. College Station shall promptly furnish Bryan with maps of the affected area in the event of an annexation or disannexation. Within sixty (60) days from the date such maps are furnished, Bryan shall identify all Customers located within such annexed or disannexed territory and adjust its accounting system accordingly. For the purposes of calculating Gross Receipts, Customers, if any, included within an annexed area shall be deemed to commence sixty (60) days from the date College Station furnishes the maps to Bryan. Section 12. NON-EXCLUSIVE FRANCHISE. This Franchise is not exclusive and nothing herein contained shall be construed so to prevent College Station from granting other like or similar rights, privileges and franchises to any other Person. Section 13. DEFAULT; REMEDIES. In addition to all rights and powers of College Station by virtue of this Franchise or otherwise, College Station reserves the rights to terminate and cancel this Franchise in accordance with the following provisions: A. Violation of Provisions. This Franchise may be terminated by College Station in the event Bryan shall by act or omission materially violate any term, condition or provision of this Franchise and shall fail or refuse to effect compliance within thirty (30) days following written demand by College Station to do so. Upon the occurrence of an event of default by Bryan which cannot be cured within such thirty (30) day period, Bryan shall have sixty (60) calendar days (or such additional time as may be agreed to by College Station) after receipt of written notice from College Station of an occurrence of such event of default to cure same before College Station may exercise any of its rights or remedies pursuant to this Section 13. B. Method of Termination and Cancellation. Any such termination and cancellation of this Franchise shall be by ordinance adopted by College Station; provided, however, before any such ordinance is adopted, Bryan shall be given at least thirty (30) days’ advance written notice, which notice shall set forth the causes and reasons for the proposed termination and cancellation, shall advise Bryan that it will be provided an opportunity to be heard by City Council regarding such proposed action before any such action is taken, and shall set forth the time, date, and place of the hearing. In no event shall such hearing be held less than thirty (30) days following delivery of such notice to Bryan. The final decision of the City Council may be appealed to any court or regulatory authority having jurisdiction. Upon timely appeal by Bryan of the City Council’s decision terminating the Franchise granted herein, the effective date of such termination shall be either when such appeal is withdrawn or a court order upholding the termination becomes final and unappealable. If DocuSign Envelope ID: 97529F74-CF21-4E92-BF30-81903AE4E11B Page 61 of 310 11 no appeal is filed, the effective date of such termination shall be the thirtieth (30th) day following the date of the final termination decision of the City Council. Until the termination becomes effective the provisions of the Franchise granted herein shall remain in effect for all purposes. C. Force Majeure. Other than its failure, refusal or inability to pay its debts and obligations, including, specifically, the payments to College Station required by this Franchise, Bryan shall not be declared in default or be subject to a sanction under any provision of this Franchise in those cases in which performance of such provision is prevented by reasons beyond its reasonable control. Section 14. RATE REGULATION; RESERVE OF REGULATORY POWERS; RESERVE OF LEGAL RIGHTS. A. Rate Regulation. College Station shall have only such regulatory power, authority, and jurisdiction respecting Bryan’s rates, if any, as may be provided by law, if any. B. Regulatory Powers. College Station by the granting of this Franchise does not render or to any extent lose, waive, impair, or lessen the lawful powers and rights, now or hereafter vested in College Station under the Constitution and statutes of the State of Texas and of the United States of America and under the Charter of College Station, to regulate the use of the Streets by College Station. C. Legal Rights. Bryan by accepting this Franchise does not surrender or to any extent lose, waive, impair or lessen the lawful powers and rights now or hereafter vested in Bryan under the Constitution and statutes of the State of Texas and of the United States of America. Section 15. GOVERNMENTAL FUNCTION. All of the lawful regulations and activities required by this Franchise are hereby declared to be governmental and for the health, safety, and welfare of the general public. Section 16. ASSIGNMENT. Bryan shall not assign its rights or obligations under this Franchise, nor any part of such rights or obligations, without the prior written consent of College Station, which consent shall not be unreasonably withheld, conditioned, or delayed. As a condition of an assignment the proposed assignee shall execute a written acknowledgment that it has read, understood, and intends to abide by this Franchise, and that the assignee assumes all obligations and liabilities imposed by this Franchise on Bryan. Section 17. PUBLICATION COST. In compliance with the provisions of Article III, Section 35 of College Station Charter, Bryan shall pay the cost of those publications of this Franchise required by such Charter provisions. DocuSign Envelope ID: 97529F74-CF21-4E92-BF30-81903AE4E11B Page 62 of 310 12 Section 18. ACCEPTANCE. Bryan shall, within thirty (30) days from the date this Franchise takes effect, file with the Secretary of College Station a written statement signed in its name and behalf in substantially the following form: To the Honorable Mayor and City Council: The City of Bryan, Texas, for itself, its successors and assigns, hereby accepts the attached Franchise and agrees to be bound by all of its terms and provisions. City of Bryan, Texas By:__________________________________________ Date: _____________________ Section 19. SEVERABILITY. If any provisions, section, subsection, clause, or phrase of this Ordinance is for any reason held to be unconstitutional, void, or invalid (or for any reason unenforceable), to the extent practicable, the validity of the remaining portions of this Franchise shall not be affected thereby, it being the intent of College Station in adopting this Ordinance that so long as practicable no portion hereof or provision hereof shall become inoperative or fail by reason of any unconstitutionality or invalidity of any other portion, provision, or regulation, and to this end, all provisions of this Ordinance are declared to be severable. If a modification of this Ordinance by severance of valid provisions from invalid provisions results in an ordinance that is not practicable, in the opinion of either party, then the parties agree to meet promptly and discuss any necessary amendments or modifications to this Ordinance. If the parties are unable to agree on necessary amendments or modifications within a reasonable period of time, then this Ordinance may be terminated by either party by providing thirty (30) days’ written notice to the other. Section 20. NOTICES. Any notices required to be sent to the parties under this Franchise shall be sent to the following: CITY OF COLLEGE STATION BRYAN TEXAS UTILITIES City Manager General Manager P.O. Box 9960 P.O. Box 1000 College Station, Texas 77842 Bryan, Texas 77805 Any such notice shall be deemed to have been served and received if: (i) delivered in person to the address set forth above; (ii) deposited in an official depository under the regular care and custody of the United States Postal Service and sent by certified mail, return receipt requested, and addressed to such party at the address hereinafter specified; or (iii) delivered to such party by courier receipted delivery. Either party may designate another address for notice, but until written notice of such change is deemed served and received by the other party as provided above, the last address of such party designated for notice shall remain such party’s address for notice. DocuSign Envelope ID: 97529F74-CF21-4E92-BF30-81903AE4E11B Page 63 of 310 13 Section 21. PASSAGE AND EFFECTIVE DATE. This Franchise shall take effect and be in force from and after sixty (60) days’ following its final passage and approval. PASSED first reading this _________________ day of ____________________ , A.D. 2021. PASSED second reading this _______________ day of ____________________ , A.D. 2021. APPROVED this _________________ day of ___________________ , A.D. 2021. CITY OF BRYAN CITY OF COLLEGE STATION By: _______________________________ By: ___________________________________ Andrew Nelson, Mayor Karl Mooney, Mayor Date: ______________________________ Date: __________________________________ ATTEST: ATTEST: __________________________________ _______________________________________ Mary Lynne Stratta, City Secretary Tanya D. Smith, City Secretary Date: ______________________________ Date: __________________________________ APPROVED: ______________________________________ Bryan Woods, City Manager Date: _________________________________ APPROVED AS TO FORM: APPROVED AS TO FORM: __________________________________ _______________________________________ Thomas A. Leeper, Interim City Attorney Carla A. Robinson, City Attorney Date: _____________________________ Date: __________________________________ DocuSign Envelope ID: 97529F74-CF21-4E92-BF30-81903AE4E11B 9/16/2021 9/16/2021 9/20/2021 Page 64 of 310 October 14, 2021 Item No. 7.10. Commercial Real Estate Brokerage Services Sponsor:Natalie Ruiz, Director of Economic Development Reviewed By CBC:City Council Agenda Caption:Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding the approval of a contract with Oldham Goodwin Group, LLC for commercial real estate brokerage services for City-owned property in the Midtown Business Park. Relationship to Strategic Goals: Diverse & Growing Economy Recommendation(s): Staff recommend that Council approve the contract. Summary: The City of College Station desires to sell the 28.77 acres of land in the Midtown Business Park adjacent to the intersection of Corporate Parkway and the State Highway 6 access road to a qualified developer for expeditious commercial development. This area is designated as Commercial Sub-District A in the Business Park. In May/June 2021, staff solicited proposals through RFP #21-047 with three (3) respondents. Following review, staff recommend awarding a contract to Oldham Goodwin Group, LLC to perform commercial real estate brokerage services for the property. Oldham Goodwin Group, LLC will provide detailed pre-marketing, marketing, transaction, and post- closing services through this contract. Budget & Financial Summary: Oldham Goodwin and any Buyer’s representative will be compensated for sale transactions with a cash payment immediately upon the closing of escrow. The payment will be made directly from the title company. If a buyer’s agent is present, the commission fee is 4.0% of the gross sales price. If there is no buyer’s agent, the commission fee is 3.0% of the gross sales price. Attachments: 1.21300702 Oldham Goodwin Page 65 of 310 CONTRACT & AGREEMENT ROUTING FORM __Original(s) sent to CSO on _____ Scanned into Laserfiche on _________ ____Original(s) sent to Fiscal on ________ CONTRACT#: _______ PROJECT#: _________ BID/RFP/RFQ#: _______ Project Name / Contract Description: _____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ Name of Contractor: ____________________________________________________________ CONTRACT TOTAL VALUE: $ _________________ Grant Funded Yes No If yes, what is the grant number: Debarment Check Yes No N/A Davis Bacon Wages Used Yes No N/A Section 3 Plan Incl. Yes No N/A Buy America Required Yes No N/A Transparency Report Yes No N/A NEW CONTRACT RENEWAL # _____ CHANGE ORDER # _____ OTHER ______________ BUDGETARY AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION (Include number of bids solicited, number of bids received, funding source, budget vs. actual cost, summary tabulation) ___________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________ (If required)* CRC Approval Date*: __________ Council Approval Date*: ____________ Agenda Item No*: ______ --Section to be completed by Risk, Purchasing or City Secretary’s Office Only— Insurance Certificates: ______ Performance Bond: ________ Payment Bond: ________ Info Tech: _______ SIGNATURES RECOMMENDING APPROVAL __________________________________________ _________________________________ DEPARTMENT DIRECTOR/ADMINISTERING CONTRACT DATE __________________________________________ _________________________________ LEGAL DEPARTMENT DATE __________________________________________ _________________________________ ASST CITY MGR – CFO DATE APPROVED & EXECUTED __________________________________________ _________________________________ CITY MANAGER DATE __________________________________________ _________________________________ MAYOR (if applicable) DATE __________________________________________ _________________________________ CITY SECRETARY (if applicable) DATE 21300702 21-047 Commercial Real Estate Brokerage Services with Oldham Goodwin Group, LLC for 28.77 acres of land in the Midtown Business Park Oldham Goodwin Group, LLC 3-4% of gross sales price n n n n n n RFP 21-047 was released May 2021, and the City received 3 proposals. Following staff review of evaluation factors, Oldham Goodwin was selected to provide commercial brokerage services to market the City property. Revenues of land sale will go into Spring Creek Local Government Fund which will repay General Fund. Expenses would come from 10030190-5300 if incurred. 9/15/21 10/14/2021 N/A N/A NA N/A N/A N/A N/A 9/24/2021 Page 66 of 310 Contract No. 21300702 General Service Contract Oldham Goodwin Group LLC CRC 09-15-2021 Page | 1 CITY OF COLLEGE STATION GENERAL SERVICE CONTRACT This General Service Contract is by and between the City of College Station, a Texas Home-Oldham Goodwin Group, LLC (the commercial real estate brokerage services as described in the Scope of Services attached as ARTICLE I PAYMENT AND TERM 1.01 Consideration. In consideration for the services performed in the Scope of ity shall pay the Contractor a set fee as set forth in hereto. 1.02 Payment.Payment will occur at closing as set forth in and in no event later than thirty (30) . 1.03 Time is of the Essence. The Contractor must complete all the services described in the Scope of Services by the following dates: from the Effective Date. 1.04 Executed Contract. commence until this Contract is fully executed and all exhibits and other attachments are completely executed and attached to the Contract. ARTICLE II CHANGE ORDERS 2.01 Changes will not be made, nor will invoices for changes, alterations, modifications, deviations, or extra work or services be recognized or paid, except upon the prior written order from authorized personnel of the City. The Contractor will not execute change orders on behalf of the City or otherwise alter the financial scope of the services except in the event of a duly authorized change order approved by the City as provided in this Contract. (a) City Manager Approval. When the original Contract amount plus all change orders is $100,000 or less, the City Manager or his designee may approve the written change order provided the change order does not increase the total amount set forth in the Contract to more than $100,000. For such contracts, when a change order results in a total contract amount that exceeds $100,000, the City Council of the City must approve such change order prior to commencement of the services or work; and Page 67 of 310 Contract No. 21300702 General Service Contract Oldham Goodwin Group LLC CRC 09-15-2021 Page | 2 (b) City Council Approval. When the original contract amount plus all change orders is greater than $100,000, the City Manager or his designee may approve the written change order provided the change order does not exceed $50,000. For such contracts, when a change order exceeds $50,000, the City Council of the City must approve such change order prior to commencement of the services or work. The sum of all change orders may not exceed 25% of the original contract amount. (c) Increase in Scope. Any request by the Contractor for an increase in the Scope of Services and an increase in the amount listed in Article I of this Contract shall be made and approved by the City prior to the Contractor providing such services or the right to payment for such additional services shall be waived. (d) Dispute.If there is a dispute between the Contractor and the City respecting any service provided or to be provided hereunder by the Contractor, including a dispute as to whether such service is additional to the Scope of Services included in this Contract, the Contractor agrees to continue providing on a timely basis all services to be provided by the Contractor hereunder, including any service as to which there is a dispute. ARTICLE III INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR AND SUBCONTRACTORS 3.01 Independent Contractor. It is understood and agreed by the parties that the Contractor is an independent contractor retained for the services described in the Scope of Services. The Contractor shall be solely responsible for and have control over the means, methods, techniques and procedures, and for coordination of all portions of the work or services. Unless otherwise provided in the Contract, the Contractor shall provide and pay for labor, materials, equipment, tools, utilities, transportation, and other facilities and services necessary for proper execution and completion of the work or services. In addition, at the appropriate times, the Contractor shall arrange and bear cost of tests, inspections, and approvals of portions of the work or services required by the Contract or by laws, statutes, ordinances, codes, rules and regulations, or lawful orders of public authorities. The City will not control the manner or the means of the Contractor's performance, but shall be entitled to a work product as in the Scope of Services. The City will not be responsible for reporting or paying employment taxes or other similar levies that may be required by the United States Internal Revenue Service or other State or Federal agencies. This Contract does not create a joint venture. 3.02 Subcontractor. shall mean and include only those hired by and having a direct contact with Contractor for performance of work or services on the Project. The City shall have no responsibility to any subcontractor employed by a Contractor for performance of work or services on the Project, and all subcontractors shall look exclusively to the Contractor for any payments due. The Contractor shall be fully responsible to the City for the acts and omissions of its subcontractors. Nothing contained herein shall create any contractual or employment relations between any subcontractor and the City. Page 68 of 310 Contract No. 21300702 General Service Contract Oldham Goodwin Group LLC CRC 09-15-2021 Page | 3 ARTICLE IV INSURANCE 4.01 The Contractor shall procure and maintain, at its sole cost and expense for the duration of this Contract, insurance against claims for injuries to persons or damages to property that may arise from or in connection with the performance of the services performed by the Contractor, its officers, agents, volunteers, and employees. 4.02 e Station, its officers, agents, volunteers, and employees as additional insureds. More specifically, the following shall be required. Certificates of insurance evidencing the required insurance policies are attached in E . During the term of requirements of this section. 4.03 Types. Contractor shall have the following types of insurance: (a)Commercial General Liability; (b)Business Automobile Liability; and (c)Workers' Compensation . 4.04 General Requirements Applicable to All Policies.The following General requirements applicable to all policies shall apply: (a)Certificates of Insurance shall be prepared and executed by the insurance company or its authorized agent. (b)Certificates of Insurance and endorsements shall be furnished on the most current State of Texas Department of Insurance-approved forms to the attached to this Agreement as Exhibit C; and shall be approved by the City before work begins. (c)Contractor shall be responsible for all deductibles on any policies obtained in compliance with this Agreement. Deductibles shall be listed on the Certificate of Insurance and are acceptable on a per-occurrence basis only. (d)The City will accept only licensed Insurance Carriers authorized to do business in the State of Texas. (e). (f)Coverage shall not be suspended, canceled, non-renewed or reduced in limits of liability before thirty (30) days written notice has been given to the City. 4.05 Commercial General Liability.The following Commercial General Liability requirements shall apply: Page 69 of 310 Contract No. 21300702 General Service Contract Oldham Goodwin Group LLC CRC 09-15-2021 Page | 4 (a) better under the current A. M. Best Key Rating Guide. (b)Policies shall contain an endorsement listing the City as Additional Insured - to self-insurance or any insurance the City may have or obtain. (c)Limits of liability must be equal to or greater than $1,000,000 per occurrence for bodily injury and property damage, with an annual aggregate limit of $2,000,000.00. Limits shall be endorsed to be per project. (d)No coverage shall be excluded from the standard policy without notification acceptance. (e)The coverage shall not exclude the following: premises/operations with separate aggregate; independent contracts; products/completed operations; contractual liability (insuring the indemnity provided herein) Host Liquor Liability, and Personal & Advertising Liability. 4.06 Business Automobile Liability.The following Business Automobile Liability requirements shall apply: (a)Business Automobile Liability insurance shall be written by a carrier rated (b)Policies shall contain an endorsement listing the City as Additional Insured on- to self-insurance or any insurance the City may have or obtain. (c)Combined Single Limit of Liability not less than $1,000,000 per occurrence for bodily injury and property damage. (d)The Business Auto Policy must show Symbol 1 in the Covered Autos Portion of the liability section in Item 2 of the declarations page. (e)The coverage shall include any autos, owned autos, leased or rented autos, non-owned autos, and hired autos. 4.07 Insurance.The following shall include the following terms: (a) for each accident/each disease/each employee are required; (b)r From Others Endorsement, WC 42 ; and (c) named in Item 3A and the States of NV, ND, OH, . Page 70 of 310 Contract No. 21300702 General Service Contract Oldham Goodwin Group LLC CRC 09-15-2021 Page | 5 ARTICLE V INDEMNIFICATION AND RELEASE 5.01 Indemnification. The Contractor shall indemnify, hold harmless, and defend the City, its Council members, officials, officers, agents, volunteers, and employees from and against any and all claims, losses, damages, causes of action, suits, and liability of every kind, any person or for damage to any property arising out of or in connection with the work or services done by the Contractor under this Contract. Such indemnity shall apply regardless of whether the claims, losses, damages, causes of action, suits, or liability arise in whole or in part from the negligence of the City, any other party indemnified hereunder, the Contractor, or any third party. There shall be no additional indemnification other than as set forth in this section. All other provisions regarding the same subject matter shall be declared void and of no effect. 5.02 Release. The Contractor assumes full responsibility for the work to be performed hereunder and hereby releases, relinquishes, and discharges the City, its Council members, officials, officers, agents, volunteers, and employees from all claims, demands, and causes of action of every kind and character, including the cost of defense thereof, for any injury to or death of any person and any loss of or damage to any property that is caused by, alleged to be caused by, arising out of, or in connection with the Contractor's work to be performed hereunder. This release shall apply regardless of whether said claims, demands, and causes of action are covered in whole or in part by insurance and regardless of whether such injury, death, loss, or damage was caused in whole or in part by the negligence of the City, any other party released hereunder, the Contractor, or any third party. There shall be no additional release or hold harmless provision other than as set forth in this section. All other provisions regarding the same subject matter shall be declared void and of no effect. ARTICLE VI GENERAL TERMS 6.01 Performance. Contractor, its employees, associates, or subcontractors shall perform all the work or services described in the Scope of Services in a good, workmanlike, and professional manner and in accordance with this Contract, and all applicable laws, codes, and regulations. Contractor shall be fully qualified and competent to perform the work or services. Contractor shall undertake and complete the work or services in a timely manner. 6.02 Termination.The City may terminate the Project and this Contract, at any time, for convenience. In the event of such termination the City will notify the Contractor in writing and the Contractor shall cease work immediately. Contractor shall be compensated for the work or services performed. Should the City terminate this Contract for convenience, the City shall pay Contractor for the work or services performed and expenses incurred before the date of termination. Page 71 of 310 Contract No. 21300702 General Service Contract Oldham Goodwin Group LLC CRC 09-15-2021 Page | 6 6.03 Venue.This Contract has been made under and shall be governed by the laws of the State of Texas. The parties agree that performance and all matters related thereto shall be in Brazos County, Texas. 6.04 Amendment.This Contract may only be amended by written instrument approved and executed by the parties. 6.05 Taxes.The City is exempt from payment of state and local sales and use taxes on labor and materials incorporated into the project. If necessary, it is the Contractor's responsibility to obtain a sales tax permit, resale certificate, and exemption certificate that shall enable the Contractor to buy any materials to be incorporated into the project and then resell the aforementioned materials to the City without paying the tax on the materials at the time of purchase. 6.06 Compliance with Laws. The Contractor will comply with all applicable federal, state, and local statutes, regulations, ordinances, and other laws, including but not limited to the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA). The Contractor may not knowingly obtain the labor or services of an undocumented worker. The Contractor, not the City, must verify eligibility for employment as required by IRCA. 6.07 Waiver of Terms. No waiver or deferral by either party of any term or condition of this Contract shall be deemed or construed to be a waiver or deferral of any other term or condition or subsequent waiver or deferral of the same term or condition. 6.08 Assignment. This Contract and the rights and obligations contained herein may not be assigned by the Contractor without the prior written approval of City. 6.09 Invalidity. If any provision of this Agreement shall be held to be invalid, illegal or unenforceable by a court or other tribunal of competent jurisdiction, the validity, legality, and enforceability of the remaining provisions shall not in any way be affected or impaired thereby. The parties shall use their best efforts to replace the respective provision or provisions of this Agreement with legal terms and conditions approximating the original intent of the parties. 6.10 Prioritization. Contractor and City agree that City is a political subdivision of the State of Texas and is thus subject to certain laws. Because of this there may be documents or portions thereof added by Contractor to this Agreement as exhibits that conflict with such laws, or that conflict with the terms and conditions herein excluding the additions by Contractor. In either case, the applicable law or the applicable provision of this Agreement excluding such conflicting addition by Contractor shall prevail. The parties understand this section comprises part of this Agreement without necessity of additional consideration. 6.11 Entire Agreement.This Contract represents the entire and integrated agreement between the City and Contractor and supersedes all prior negotiations, representations, or agreements, either written or oral. This Contract may only be amended by written instrument approved and executed by the parties. Page 72 of 310 Contract No. 21300702 General Service Contract Oldham Goodwin Group LLC CRC 09-15-2021 Page | 7 6.12 Agree to Terms.The parties state that they have read the terms and conditions of this Contract and agree to the terms and conditions contained in this Contract. 6.13 Effective Date.This Contract goes into effect when duly approved by all the parties hereto. 6.14 Notice. CITY OF COLLEGE STATION OLDHAM GOODWIN GROUP, LLC Attn: Natalie Ruiz PO BOX 9960 Attn: ___________________ 1101 Texas Ave ________________________ College Station, TX 77842 ________________________ nruiz@cstx.gov ________________________ 6.17 Exhibits. To the extent applicable, this Contract is subject to the following: (a)Boycott Israel. If this Contract is for goods and services subject to § 2270.002 Texas Government Code, Contractor verifies that it i) does not boycott Israel; and ii) will not boycott Israel during the term of this Contract; (b)Boycott Firearms. If this Contract is for goods and services subject to § 2274.002 Texas Government Code, Contractor verifies that it i) does not have a practice, policy, guidance, or directive that discriminates against a Jeremy Richmond 2800 Texas Avenue #401 Bryan, TX 77802 jeremy.richmond@oldhamgoodwin.com Page 73 of 310 Contract No. 21300702 General Service Contract Oldham Goodwin Group LLC CRC 09-15-2021 Page | 8 firearm entity or firearm trade association; and ii) will not discriminate during the term of the contract against a firearm entity or firearm trade association; and (c)Boycott Energy Companies. Subject to § 2274.002 Texas Government Code Contractor herein verifies that it i) does not boycott energy companies; and ii) will not boycott energy companies during the term of this Contract. Page 74 of 310 Contract No. 21300702 General Service Contract Oldham Goodwin Group LLC CRC 09-15-2021 Page | 9 List of Exhibits A.Scope of Services B.Payment Schedule C.Certificates of Insurance OLDHAM GOODWIN GROUP, LLC CITY OF COLLEGE STATION By: By: City Manager Printed Name: Date: Title:APPROVED: Date: City Attorney Date: Assistant City Manager/CFO Date: Managing Director - Land Services 9/24/2021 Jeremy Richmond Page 75 of 310 Contract No. 21300702 General Service Contract Oldham Goodwin Group LLC CRC 09-15-2021 EXHIBIT A SCOPE OF SERVICES The terms and conditions of this Contract shall take precedence and control over any term or provision of the Scope of Services that in any way conflicts with, differs from, or attempts to alter the terms of this Contract. The City desires to sell the 28.77 acres of land (Lot 1A) zoned General Commercial at the Midtown Business Park to a qualified developer for expeditious commercial development. A suitable developer should address proposed uses, development footprint, timeline, expected There will be no upfront cost or fees to list any properties with Oldham Goodwin (OG). The expenses incurred with listing the property will be the obligation of the brokerage firm. The City of College Station will not be responsible for any marketing costs generated through Oldham Goodwin in the process of providing full-service brokerage and marketing activity of the property. Pre-Marketing Based on walking the property and examining the physical attributes of the site, economic feasibility, as well as analyses of the location, configuration, topography, utility capacities, access, zoning ordinances, and legal encumbrances, Oldham Goodwin will perform a detailed market analysis and valuation of the property utilizing other similar commercial land sales and Station with a recommended listing price based on t OG will design property specific marketing materials that highlight the attributes and development opportunities of the asset. Marketing materials will include a customized offering memorandum, aerial photography, and other print and web-based media. At their expense, visible on the property from State Highway 6. OG will also create a customized aerial drone video of the property and the surrounding sub-market. This is particularly valuable when location. The drone video allows out of market investors to tour the asset from a distance. While designing marketing material, OG will work with city staff and stakeholders to gather and organize all property level due diligence information such as existing surveys, plats, declaration of covenants, conditions, and restrictions, engineering reports, title documents, feasibility studies, environmental, and conceptual plans. This information is not only critical in proving the value of the property but will eliminate unnecessary delays in the negotiation and contract period with potential buyers. Marketing Oldham Goodwin Land Services will distribute detailed marketing information to all major real estate professionals nationwide. This includes a database of tenants, owners, developers, 1031 Page 76 of 310 Contract No. 21300702 General Service Contract Oldham Goodwin Group LLC CRC 09-15-2021 exchange buyers, brokers, as well as private and public REITS, private equity funds, and independent investors. The property will be advertised on high-traffic commercial real estate marketing websites listed below. Loopnet TXLS CoStar Group Bryan-College Station MLS CREXi Houston Area Realtors All marketing information will be uploaded to the Oldham Goodwin Group, LLC website (www.oldhamgoodwin.com). This will be another avenue for brokers and potential customers to gather more information regarding the property. OG will design multiple property specific custom email blasts that will be delivered to their network and database of real estate professionals nationwide through Constant Contact, Property Send, and Property Campaign. OG will also implement a focused direct calling campaign to potential buyers and users. OG will provide reports to the City of College Station on a regular frequency with full transparency and will be available to meet with and make presentations to the City of College Station Economic Development Meetings, City Council, or other meetings as required. Transaction The result of Oldham Goodwin Land Services marketing efforts will be the procurement of potential buyers. Oldham Goodwin will conduct site tours and assist potential buyers with completing required forms and conducting their due diligence. Once an offer is received, OG will present all details of the terms of the offer and background of the prospective buyer to the City of College Station. Once the contract has been executed and delivered to the title company along with the buy time frames established by the contract. The following is a list of critical tasks provided by Oldham Goodwin Group from opening of escrow to transaction completion: Coordinate appraisals, environmental inspections, property inspections, title searches, surveys, and other consulting services Ensure all requirements are fulfilled for closing Coordinate real estate transaction closing Handle all other customary activities and services associated with real estate transactions Post-Closing Oldham Goodwin will continue to be available for follow-up and answer questions from stakeholders or public officials in the future. Property Disposition Page 77 of 310 Contract No. 21300702 General Service Contract Oldham Goodwin Group LLC CRC 09-15-2021 Page 78 of 310 Contract No. 21300702 General Service Contract Oldham Goodwin Group LLC CRC 09-15-2021 EXHIBIT B PAYMENT SCHEDULE Contractor Fee Structure. Agent Agent 4.0%3.0% Gross Sales Price representative will be compensated for sale transactions with a cash payment immediately upon the closing of escrow. The payment will be made directly These are the only fees payable under the agreement and are payable at closing. City Costs The City will be responsible for the following items paid at closing as applicable: Title Insurance Premium Survey Document Preparation Escrow Fees Tax Certificates Courier Fees Recording Fees Page 79 of 310 Contract No. 21300702 General Service Contract Oldham Goodwin Group LLC CRC 09-15-2021 EXHIBIT C CERTIFICATES OF INSURANCE Page 80 of 310 ANY PROPRIETOR/PARTNER/EXECUTIVE OFFICER/MEMBER EXCLUDED? INSR ADDL SUBR LTR INSD WVD PRODUCER CONTACT NAME: FAXPHONE (A/C, No):(A/C, No, Ext): E-MAIL ADDRESS: INSURER A : INSURED INSURER B : INSURER C : INSURER D : INSURER E : INSURER F : POLICY NUMBER POLICY EFF POLICY EXPTYPE OF INSURANCE LIMITS(MM/DD/YYYY)(MM/DD/YYYY) AUTOMOBILE LIABILITY UMBRELLA LIAB EXCESS LIAB WORKERS COMPENSATION AND EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY DESCRIPTION OF OPERATIONS / LOCATIONS / VEHICLES (ACORD 101, Additional Remarks Schedule, may be attached if more space is required) AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE EACH OCCURRENCE $ DAMAGE TO RENTEDCLAIMS-MADE OCCUR $PREMISES (Ea occurrence) MED EXP (Any one person)$ PERSONAL & ADV INJURY $ GEN'L AGGREGATE LIMIT APPLIES PER:GENERAL AGGREGATE $ PRO-POLICY LOC PRODUCTS - COMP/OP AGGJECT OTHER:$ COMBINED SINGLE LIMIT $(Ea accident) ANY AUTO BODILY INJURY (Per person)$ OWNED SCHEDULED BODILY INJURY (Per accident)$AUTOS ONLY AUTOS HIRED NON-OWNED PROPERTY DAMAGE $AUTOS ONLY AUTOS ONLY (Per accident) $ OCCUR EACH OCCURRENCE CLAIMS-MADE AGGREGATE $ DED RETENTION $ PER OTH- STATUTE ER E.L. EACH ACCIDENT E.L. DISEASE - EA EMPLOYEE $ If yes, describe under E.L. DISEASE - POLICY LIMITDESCRIPTION OF OPERATIONS below INSURER(S) AFFORDING COVERAGE NAIC # COMMERCIAL GENERAL LIABILITY Y / N N / A (Mandatory in NH) SHOULD ANY OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED POLICIES BE CANCELLED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION DATE THEREOF, NOTICE WILL BE DELIVERED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE POLICY PROVISIONS. THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT THE POLICIES OF INSURANCE LISTED BELOW HAVE BEEN ISSUED TO THE INSURED NAMED ABOVE FOR THE POLICY PERIOD INDICATED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY REQUIREMENT, TERM OR CONDITION OF ANY CONTRACT OR OTHER DOCUMENT WITH RESPECT TO WHICH THIS CERTIFICATE MAY BE ISSUED OR MAY PERTAIN, THE INSURANCE AFFORDED BY THE POLICIES DESCRIBED HEREIN IS SUBJECT TO ALL THE TERMS, EXCLUSIONS AND CONDITIONS OF SUCH POLICIES. LIMITS SHOWN MAY HAVE BEEN REDUCED BY PAID CLAIMS. THIS CERTIFICATE IS ISSUED AS A MATTER OF INFORMATION ONLY AND CONFERS NO RIGHTS UPON THE CERTIFICATE HOLDER. THIS CERTIFICATE DOES NOT AFFIRMATIVELY OR NEGATIVELY AMEND, EXTEND OR ALTER THE COVERAGE AFFORDED BY THE POLICIES BELOW. THIS CERTIFICATE OF INSURANCE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE A CONTRACT BETWEEN THE ISSUING INSURER(S), AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE OR PRODUCER, AND THE CERTIFICATE HOLDER. IMPORTANT: If the certificate holder is an ADDITIONAL INSURED, the policy(ies) must have ADDITIONAL INSURED provisions or be endorsed. If SUBROGATION IS WAIVED, subject to the terms and conditions of the policy, certain policies may require an endorsement. A statement on this certificate does not confer rights to the certificate holder in lieu of such endorsement(s). COVERAGES CERTIFICATE NUMBER:REVISION NUMBER: CERTIFICATE HOLDER CANCELLATION © 1988-2015 ACORD CORPORATION. All rights reserved.ACORD 25 (2016/03) CERTIFICATE OF LIABILITY INSURANCE DATE (MM/DD/YYYY) $ $ $ $ $ The ACORD name and logo are registered marks of ACORD 9/14/2021 (972) 613-2224 (972) 613-3919 13064 Oldham Goodwin Group, LLC 2800 South Texas Avenue Suite 401 Bryan, TX 77802 10472 21199 A 1,000,000 X WKF0000363 9/30/2020 9/30/2021 100,000 No Deductible 5,000 TRIA Included 1,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 Hired NonOwned 1,000,000 5,000,000B X XS20033753 9/30/2020 9/30/2021 5,000,000 0 C Professional Liabili X SPL006471801 1/11/2021 See Below Corporate Office - 2800 S. Texas Ave. Ste 401, Bryan, TX 77802-5328 30 Day Notice of Cancellation except 10 Days for Non-Payment of Premium Umbrella is Follow Form General Liability and Umbrella include Terrorism per TRIA Corporate Office - 2800 S. Texas Ave. Ste 401, Bryan, TX 77802-5328 Additional Insureds: Oldham Goodwin Development, LLC, Oldham Goodwin Capital, LLC & Oldham Goodwin Payroll, LLC SEE ATTACHED ACORD 101 City of College Station PO Box 9960 College Station, TX 77842 OLDHGOO-01 ATHOMAS Acrisure, LLC dba Commercial Insurance Solutions Group 3933 Elm Street Dallas, TX 75226 info@cis-ais.com United National Insurance Company Capitol Indemnity Corporation Arch Specialty Insurance Company TRIA Included 1/11/2022 X X X X X X X Page 81 of 310 FORM NUMBER: EFFECTIVE DATE: The ACORD name and logo are registered marks of ACORD ADDITIONAL REMARKS ADDITIONAL REMARKS SCHEDULE FORM TITLE: Page of THIS ADDITIONAL REMARKS FORM IS A SCHEDULE TO ACORD FORM, ACORD 101 (2008/01) AGENCY CUSTOMER ID: LOC #: AGENCY NAMED INSURED POLICY NUMBER CARRIER NAIC CODE © 2008 ACORD CORPORATION. All rights reserved. Acrisure, LLC dba Commercial Insurance Solutions Group OLDHGOO-01 SEE PAGE 1 1 SEE PAGE 1 ACORD 25 Certificate of Liability Insurance 1 SEE P 1 Oldham Goodwin Group, LLC 2800 South Texas Avenue Suite 401 Bryan, TX 77802 Brazos SEE PAGE 1 ATHOMAS 1 Description of Operations/Locations/Vehicles: Umbrella is Follow Form. Professional Liability (Errors & Omissions - Claims Made): Coverage on behalf of Professional Services - Real Estate Agent, Broker, Property Management, Leasing and Appraisal Services for Others $1,000,000 Limit Each Claim/Aggregate $15,000 Retention Each Claim Includes Lock Box Coverage subject to $100,000 Limit and Third Party Tenant Discrimination subject to $250,000 Limit Defense of Disciplinary Proceedings - $10,000 Retroactive Date - 02/25/2005 Page 82 of 310 EPA-354 (05/2008) Page 1 of 5 (The attaching clause need be completed only when this endorsement is issued subsequent to preparation of the policy.) This Endorsement, effective 9/30/2020 at 12:01 A.M. forms a part of Policy No: WKF0000363 Issued To: Oldham Goodwin Group, LLC By: United National Insurance Company THIS ENDORSEMENT CHANGES THE POLICY. PLEASE READ IT CAREFULLY HIRED AUTO AND NON-OWNED AUTO LIABILITY (UNAGGREGATED) This endorsement modifies insurance provided under the following: COMMERCIAL GENERAL LIABILITY COVERAGE PART SCHEDULE Insurance is provided only with respect to those coverages for which a specific premium charge is shown: Coverage Limit of Insurance Additional Premium Hired Auto Liability $1,000,000 Included Non-Ownership Liability $1,000,000 Included (If no entry appears above, information required to complete this endorsement will be shown in the Declarations as applicable to this endorsement.) A. HIRED AUTO LIABILITY The insurance provided under COVERAGE A – BODILY INJURY AND PROPERTY DAMAGE LIABILITY (Section I – Coverages) applies to “bodily injury” or “property damage” arising out of the maintenance or use of a “hired auto” by you or your “employees” in the course of your business. B. NON – OWNED AUTO LIABILITY The insurance provided under COVERAGE A – BODILY INJURY AND PROPERTY DAMAGE LIABILITY (Section I – Coverages) applies to “bodily injury” or “property damage” arising out of the use of a “non-owned auto” by any person other than you, in the course of your business. Page 83 of 310 EPA-354 (05/2008) Page 2 of 5 C. With respect to the insurance provided by this endorsement: 1. Subparagraphs b., e., g., h., j., k., l., m. and n. of paragraph 2., Exclusions of COVERAGE A – BODILY INJURY AND PROPERTY DAMAGE LIABILITY (Section I – Coverages) do not apply. 2. The following exclusions are added to paragraph 2., Exclusions of COVERAGE A – BODILY INJURY AND PROPERTY DAMAGE LIABILITY (Section I – Coverages) : This insurance does not apply to: a. “Bodily injury” or “property damage” for which the insured is obligated to pay damages by reason of the assumption of liability in a contract or agreement. This exclusion does not apply to liability for damages: (1) That the insured would have in the absence of the contract or agreement; or (2) Assumed in a contract or agreement that is an “insured contract”, provided the “bodily injury” or “property damage” occurs subsequent to the execution of the contract or agreement. b. “Bodily injury” to: (1) An “employee” of the insured arising out of and in the course of: (a) Employment by the insured; or (b) Performing duties related to the conduct of the insured’s business; or (2) The spouse, child, parent, brother or sister of that “employee” as a consequence of paragraph (1) above. This exclusion applies: (1) Whether the insured may be liable as an employer or in any other capacity; and (2) To any obligation to share damages with or repay someone else who must pay the damages because of the injury. Page 84 of 310 EPA-354 (05/2008) Page 3 of 5 This exclusion does not apply to: (1) Liability assumed by the insured under an “insured contract”; or (2) “Bodily injury” to domestic “employees” not entitled to workers’ compensation benefits. c. “Property damage” to: (1) Property owned or being transported by, or rented or loaned to the insured; or (2) Property in the care, custody or control of the insured. D. For the purposes of this endorsement only, WHO IS AN INSURED (Section II) is deleted and replaced by the following: Each of the following is an insured under this insurance to the extent set forth below: 1. You. 2. Any other person using a “hired auto” with your permission. 3. With respect to a “non-owned auto”, any partner or “executive officer” of yours, but only while such “non-owned auto” is being used in your business. 4. Any other person or organization, but only with respect to their liability because of acts or omissions of an insured under paragraphs 1., 2. or 3. above. None of the following is an insured: 1. Any person engaged in the business of his or her employer with respect to “bodily injury” to any co-employee of such person injured in the course of employment; 2. Any partner or “executive officer” with respect to any “auto” owned by such partner or officer or a member of his or her household; 3. Any person while employed or otherwise engaged in performing duties related to the conduct of an “auto business”, other than an “auto business” you operate; 4. The owner or lessee (of whom you are a sublessee) of a “hired auto” or the owner of a “non-owned auto” or any agent or “employee” of any such owner or lessee; Page 85 of 310 EPA-354 (05/2008) Page 4 of 5 5. Any person or organization with respect to the conduct of any current or past partnership or joint venture that is not shown as a Named Insured in the Declarations. E. For the purposes of this endorsement only, SECTION III – LIMITS OF INSURANCE is amended as follows: 1. Paragraph 2.b. is deleted and replaced by the following: b. Damages under Coverage A, except damages because of “bodily injury” or “property damage” included in the “products-completed operations hazard” or the Hired Auto and Non-Owned Auto Liability (Unaggregated) Endorsement. 2. The following provisions are added: 8. The Hired Auto Liability Limit is the most we will pay in any one “occurrence” for all “bodily injury” or “property damage” arising out of the maintenance or use of a “hired auto” by you or your “employees” in the course of your business. 9. The Non-Ownership Liability Limit is the most we will pay in any one “occurrence” for all ‘bodily injury” or “property damage” arising out of the use of a “non-owned auto” by any person other than you, in the course of your business. F. For the purposes of this endorsement only, the definition of “insured contract” in DEFINITIONS (Section V) is amended by the addition of the following: “Insured contract” means: g. That part of any contract or agreement entered into, as part of your business, pertaining to the rental or lease, by you or any of your “employees”, of any “auto”. However, such contract or agreement will not be considered an “insured contract” to the extent that it obligates you or any of your “employees” to pay for “property damage” to any “auto” rented or leased by you or any of your “employees”. G. For the purposes of this endorsement only, the following definitions are added to DEFINITIONS (Section V): a. “Auto business” means the business or occupation of selling, repairing, servicing, storing or parking “autos”. b. “Hired auto” means any “auto” you lease, hire, rent or borrow. This does not include any “auto” you lease, hire, rent or borrow from any of your “employees”, your partners or your “executive officers”, or members of their households. Page 86 of 310 EPA-354 (05/2008) Page 5 of 5 c. “Non-owned auto” means any “auto” you do not own, lease, hire, rent or borrow which is used in connection with your business. This includes “autos” owned by your “employees”, your partners or your “executive officers”, or members of their households, but only while used in your business or your personal affairs. H. For the purposes of this endorsement only, Paragraph 4. Other Insurance of COMMERCIAL GENERAL LIABILITY CONDITIONS (Section IV) is deleted and replaced by the following: 4. This insurance is excess over any other valid and collectible insurance, whether primary, excess, contingent or on any other basis. Since this insurance is excess, we will have no duty to defend any claim or “suit” that any other insurer has a duty to defend. If no other insurer defends, we will undertake to do so, but we will be entitled to the insured’s rights against those other insurers. Since this insurance is excess over other insurance, we will pay only our share of the amount of the loss, if any, that exceeds the sum of: (1) The total amount that all such other insurance would pay for the loss in the absence of this insurance; and (2) The total of all deductible and self-insured amounts under all of that other insurance. We will share the remaining loss, if any, with any other insurance that is not described in this Excess Insurance provision and was not bought specifically to apply in excess of the Limits of Insurance shown in the Declarations of this Coverage Part. Method of Sharing If all of the other insurance permits contribution by equal shares, we will follow this method also. Under this approach each insurer contributes equal amounts until it has paid its applicable limit of insurance or none of the loss remains, whichever comes first. If any of the other insurance does not permit contribution by equal shares, we will contribute by limits. Under this method, each insurer’s share is based on the ratio of its applicable limits of insurance to those of all insurers. Page 87 of 310 SHOULD ANY OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED POLICIES BE CANCELLED BEFORE THE EXPIRATION DATE THEREOF, NOTICE WILL BE DELIVERED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE POLICY PROVISIONS. INSURER(S) AFFORDING COVERAGE INSURER F : INSURER E : INSURER D : INSURER C : INSURER B : INSURER A : NAIC # NAME:CONTACT (A/C, No):FAX E-MAILADDRESS: PRODUCER (A/C, No, Ext):PHONE INSURED REVISION NUMBER:CERTIFICATE NUMBER:COVERAGES IMPORTANT: If the certificate holder is an ADDITIONAL INSURED, the policy(ies) must have ADDITIONAL INSURED provisions or be endorsed. If SUBROGATION IS WAIVED, subject to the terms and conditions of the policy, certain policies may require an endorsement. A statement on this certificate does not confer rights to the certificate holder in lieu of such endorsement(s). THIS CERTIFICATE IS ISSUED AS A MATTER OF INFORMATION ONLY AND CONFERS NO RIGHTS UPON THE CERTIFICATE HOLDER. THIS CERTIFICATE DOES NOT AFFIRMATIVELY OR NEGATIVELY AMEND, EXTEND OR ALTER THE COVERAGE AFFORDED BY THE POLICIES BELOW. THIS CERTIFICATE OF INSURANCE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE A CONTRACT BETWEEN THE ISSUING INSURER(S), AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE OR PRODUCER, AND THE CERTIFICATE HOLDER. OTHER: (Per accident) (Ea accident) $ $ N / A SUBR WVD ADDL INSD THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT THE POLICIES OF INSURANCE LISTED BELOW HAVE BEEN ISSUED TO THE INSURED NAMED ABOVE FOR THE POLICY PERIOD INDICATED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY REQUIREMENT, TERM OR CONDITION OF ANY CONTRACT OR OTHER DOCUMENT WITH RESPECT TO WHICH THIS CERTIFICATE MAY BE ISSUED OR MAY PERTAIN, THE INSURANCE AFFORDED BY THE POLICIES DESCRIBED HEREIN IS SUBJECT TO ALL THE TERMS, EXCLUSIONS AND CONDITIONS OF SUCH POLICIES. LIMITS SHOWN MAY HAVE BEEN REDUCED BY PAID CLAIMS. $ $ $ $PROPERTY DAMAGE BODILY INJURY (Per accident) BODILY INJURY (Per person) COMBINED SINGLE LIMIT AUTOS ONLY AUTOSAUTOS ONLY NON-OWNED SCHEDULEDOWNED ANY AUTO AUTOMOBILE LIABILITY Y / N WORKERS COMPENSATION AND EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY OFFICER/MEMBER EXCLUDED? (Mandatory in NH) DESCRIPTION OF OPERATIONS below If yes, describe under ANY PROPRIETOR/PARTNER/EXECUTIVE $ $ $ E.L. DISEASE - POLICY LIMIT E.L. DISEASE - EA EMPLOYEE E.L. EACH ACCIDENT EROTH-STATUTEPER LIMITS(MM/DD/YYYY)POLICY EXP(MM/DD/YYYY)POLICY EFFPOLICY NUMBERTYPE OF INSURANCELTRINSR DESCRIPTION OF OPERATIONS / LOCATIONS / VEHICLES (ACORD 101, Additional Remarks Schedule, may be attached if more space is required) EXCESS LIAB UMBRELLA LIAB $EACH OCCURRENCE $AGGREGATE $ OCCUR CLAIMS-MADE DED RETENTION $ $PRODUCTS - COMP/OP AGG $GENERAL AGGREGATE $PERSONAL & ADV INJURY $MED EXP (Any one person) $EACH OCCURRENCE DAMAGE TO RENTED $PREMISES (Ea occurrence) COMMERCIAL GENERAL LIABILITY CLAIMS-MADE OCCUR GEN'L AGGREGATE LIMIT APPLIES PER: POLICY PRO-JECT LOC CERTIFICATE OF LIABILITY INSURANCE DATE (MM/DD/YYYY) CANCELLATION AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE ACORD 25 (2016/03) © 1988-2015 ACORD CORPORATION. All rights reserved. CERTIFICATE HOLDER The ACORD name and logo are registered marks of ACORD HIRED AUTOS ONLY 9/15/2021 Higginbotham Insurance Agency,Inc. 1400 FM 528,Suite F Webster TX 77598 Sarah Sowinski 281-990-6051 281-990-6052 ssowinski@Higginbotham.net Service Lloyds Insurance Co.43389 OLDHA4 Oldham Goodwin Payroll,LLC 2800 South Texas Ave,Ste 401 Bryan TX 77802 672746110 A X Y SLICWC0263201 3/26/2021 3/26/2022 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 Named Insured Schedule includes:Oldham Goodwin Group,LLC;Oldham Goodwin Development,LLC;Oldham Goodwin Capital,LLC;Oldham Goodwin Beverage FWS,LLC;Oldham Goodwin Beverage CW,LLC The Workers'Compensation policy has a claim deductible of $2,500. The Workers'Compensation policy includes a blanket automatic waiver of subrogation provision that provides this feature only when there is a written contract between the named insured and the certificate holder that requires it. City of College Station P.O.Box 9960 College Station TX 77842 Page 88 of 310 October 14, 2021 Item No. 8.1. Comprehensive Plan 10-Year Update Sponsor:Alyssa Halle-Schramm, Planner Reviewed By CBC:Planning & Zoning Commission Agenda Caption:Public Hearing, presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding an ordinance repealing the official City of College Station Comprehensive Plan (adopted by Ordinance No. 3186) and adopting a new Comprehensive Plan as part of the 10-year update to the City of College Station Comprehensive Plan, and all associated map updates within the Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan, the Water System Master Plan, and the Wastewater System Master Plan, as the "Official City of College Station Comprehensive Plan". Relationship to Strategic Goals: Good Governance Financial Sustainability Core Services & Infrastructure Neighborhood Integrity Diverse & Growing Economy Improving Mobility Sustainable City Recommendation(s): The Planning & Zoning Commission heard this item on September 16, 2021, and voted 6-0 to recommend approval of the 10-year update to the Comprehensive Plan, with minor text revisions. The Parks & Recreation Advisory Board heard this item on September 14, 2021, and voted unanimously to recommend approval. The Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Advisory Board heard this item on September 13, 2021, and voted unanimously to recommend approval. Staff recommends approval. Summary: This item is to consider adoption of the 10-year update to the City of College Station Comprehensive Plan. The plan update includes revised goals, policies, actions, narrative, and maps, along with associated maps from related master plans. The proposed update to the Comprehensive Plan stems from the 10-year evaluation of the plan – branded The Next 10 – that occurred during 2019 and 2020. City staff spent that time evaluating the plan, considering growth and development trends, and engaging with over 800 citizens and stakeholders from across the community. The evaluation process included extensive meetings with the Comprehensive Plan Evaluation Committee, City staff, and leadership, and multiple workshops with the Planning & Zoning Commission and City Council for guidance and input. The result was the 10-Year Evaluation & Appraisal Report that recommended plan modifications in response to changing conditions. The City Council accepted the report in October 2020. City staff have been working to implement the recommended changes, which include significant updates to the plan narrative and maps including, but not limited to, updates to the Future Land Use Page 89 of 310 & Character Map and Thoroughfare Plan. In addition, associated maps from the Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan, Water System Master Plan, and Wastewater System Master Plan are included within the update. Changes to future land uses, density, development patterns, and thoroughfares within the Comprehensive Plan have necessitated changes to those respective maps. City staff hosted a final round of public engagement efforts throughout August and into September 2021. This included virtual participation options and in-person open houses. Over 100 participants provided feedback in-person, and staff received another 98 comments through the virtual maps and 18 online surveys during this final check on the proposed plan update. City staff made refinements based on that public input. City staff presented the relevant chapters of the updated plan to the Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Advisory Board (Chapters 5-6 and the proposed bicycle and pedestrian facilities maps) and the Parks & Recreation Advisory Board (Chapter 5). Both boards unanimously recommended approval to the Planning & Zoning Commission. At their September 16, 2021, meeting, the Planning & Zoning Commission directed staff to make three minor text revisions and recommended approval of the 10-year update to the Comprehensive Plan. City staff have made the refinements requested by the Planning & Zoning Commission and present the updated Comprehensive Plan for consideration and possible adoption by City Council. Budget & Financial Summary: N/A Attachments: 1.Ordinance_Comp Plan Update 2.Updated Comprehensive Plan 3.Proposed Bicycle Facilities Map 4.Proposed Pedestrian Facilities Map 5.Future Water System Exhibit 6.Future Wastewater System Exhibit 7.Summary of Public Input Page 90 of 310 ORDINANCE NO. _______ AN ORDINANCE REPEALING THE OFFICIAL CITY OF COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN (ADOPTED BY ORDINANCE NO. 3186) AND ADOPTING A NEW COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AS PART OF THE 10-YEAR UPDATE TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, AND ALL ASSOCIATED MAP UPDATES WITHIN THE BICYCLE, PEDESTRIAN, AND GREENWAYS MASTER PLAN, THE WATER SYSTEM MASTER PLAN, AND THE WASTEWATER SYSTEM MASTER PLAN, AS THE “OFFICIAL CITY OF COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN” AS SET OUT BELOW, AND PROVIDING A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; DECLARING A PENALTY; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS: PART 1:That the Official City of College Station Comprehensive Plan (adopted by Ordinance No. 3186) is hereby repealed and a new Comprehensive Plan is hereby adopted as the “Official City of College Station Comprehensive Plan” as part of the 10-year update as set out in Exhibit “A” attached hereto and made a part of this ordinance for all purposes. PART 2:That the Official City of College Station Comprehensive Plan (Comprehensive Plan) includes all plans, studies, and amendments as set out in Exhibit “A” attached hereto and made a part of this ordinance for all purposes. PART 3:That if any provisions of any section of this Ordinance shall be held to be void or unconstitutional, such holding shall in no way affect the validity of the remaining provisions or sections of this Ordinance, which shall remain in full force and effect. PART 4:That any person, firm, corporation, organization, or agency, and any other legal entity violating any of the provisions of this chapter shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall be punishable by a fine of not less than Twenty five dollars ($25.00) nor more than Two Thousand Dollars ($2,000). Each day such violation shall continue or be permitted to continue, shall be deemed a separate offense. This Ordinance is a penal ordinance and becomes effective ten (10) days after its date of passage by the City Council, as provided by City of College Station Charter Section 35. PART 5:That this Ordinance shall take effect on November 8, 2021, after its passage. PASSED, ADOPTED and APPROVED this 14th day of October, 2021. ATTEST: APPROVED: _____________________________ _________________________________ City Secretary Mayor Page 91 of 310 ORDINANCE NO. ___________ Page 2 of 4 APPROVED: ___________________________ City Attorney Page 92 of 310 ORDINANCE NO. ___________ Page 3 of 4 EXHIBIT A The Official City of College Station Comprehensive Plan consists of the following documents that have been previously adopted by resolution and / or ordinance including any amendments thereto; all other documents previously adopted as part of the Comprehensive Plan are superseded by the adoption of this Comprehensive Plan: 1. The Northgate Redevelopment Plan dated November 1996; 2. The Revised Wolf Pen Creek Master Plan dated 1998; 3. Northgate Redevelopment Implementation Plan dated July 2003; 4. East College Station Transportation Study dated May 2005; 5. Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan dated January 2010; 6. Central College Station Neighborhood Plan dated June 2010; 7. Eastgate Neighborhood Plan dated June 2011; 8. Parks, Recreation and Open Spaces Master Plan dated July 2011; 9. Southside Area Neighborhood Plan dated August 2012; 10. Medical District Master Plan dated October 2012; 11. Wellborn Community Plan dated April 2013; 12. Economic Development Master Plan dated May 2020; 13. South Knoll Area Neighborhood Plan dated September 2013; 14. The Water System Master Plan dated April 2017; and 15. The Wastewater System Master Plan dated April 2017. Any subsequent plans and studies amending the Comprehensive Plan shall be adopted by ordinance and incorporated as part of the Official City of College Station Comprehensive Plan. All parts of the Comprehensive Plan and any amendments thereto shall be harmonized where possible to give effect to all. Only in the event of an irreconcilable conflict shall the later adopted ordinance prevail and then only to the extent necessary to avoid such conflict. Ordinances adopted at the same city council meeting without reference to another such ordinance shall be harmonized, if possible, so that effect may be given to each. The Comprehensive Plan is to be used as a guide for growth and development for the entire City and its Extraterritorial Jurisdiction (“ETJ”). The Comprehensive Plan depicts generalized locations of proposed future land uses, including thoroughfares, bicycle and pedestrian ways, parks, greenways, waterlines, and sewer lines that are subject to modification by the City to fit local conditions and budget constraints. The Comprehensive Plan, in particular the Future Land Use & Character Map, and any adopted amendments thereto, shall not be, nor be considered, a zoning map, shall not constitute zoning regulations or establish zoning boundaries, and shall not be site or parcel specific, but shall be used to illustrate generalized locations. The Comprehensive Plan and any additions, amendments, master plans and subcategories thereto depict same in generalized terms including future locations; and are subject to modifications by the City to fit local conditions, budget constraints, cost participation, and right-of-way availability that warrant further refinement as development occurs. Linear routes such as thoroughfares, bikeways, pedestrian ways, greenways, waterlines, and sewer lines that are a part of the Comprehensive Plan may be relocated by the City 1,000 feet from the locations shown in the Comprehensive Plan without being considered an amendment thereto. Page 93 of 310 ORDINANCE NO. ___________ Page 4 of 4 The term College Station Comprehensive Plan includes all of the above in its entirety as if presented in full herein, and as same may from time to time be amended. Page 94 of 310 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN OCTOBER 14, 2021 Page 95 of 310 2CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Contents CHAPTER 1 Plan Foundation CHAPTER 2 Distinctive Places CHAPTER 3 Strong Neighborhoods CHAPTER 4 A Prosperous Economy CHAPTER 5 Engaging Spaces CHAPTER 6 Integrated Mobility CHAPTER 7 Exceptional Services CHAPTER 8 Managed Growth CHAPTER 9 Collaborative Partnerships CHAPTER 10 Plan Implementation 4 18 51 67 69 152 143 125 101 80 The Comprehensive Plan contains future land use categories that serve as policy guides and set expectations for how land within the City of College Station should be developed and used in the future. The terms future land use and zoning often get confused, but they are separate tools and processes. Future land use serves as a guide for how areas of the City may develop in the future. In contrast, zoning regulates how a specific property can be developed and used today. The Comprehensive Plan does not constitute zoning regulations or establish zoning boundaries. Page 96 of 310 3CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN MAPS Map 2.1: Planning Areas Map 2.2: Future Land Use & Character Map 2.3: Community Assets & Image Corridors Map 5.1: Parks and Greenways Map 6.1: 2045 Number of Lanes Map 6.2: 2045 Traffic Volumes with Programmed Projects Map 6.3: Thoroughfare Plan - Functional Classification & Context Zones Map 6.4: 2045 Future Levels of Service Map 7.1: Public Facilities Map 8.1: Priority Annexation Areas FIGURES Figure 1.1: Planning Area Figure 1.2: The Comprehensive Plan: City-Wide Direction Figure 3.1: Housing Condition Definitions Figure 3.2: Condition of Housing Units Figure 3.3: College Station Population Growth, 1990-2020 Figure 3.4: Median Housing Prices Figure 3.5: Code Enforcement Actions 2009-2020 Figure 6.1: Activities Analyzed by Travel Demand Model Figure 8.1: Population since 1940 Figure 8.2: Growth Rate Projections Figure 8.3: Increasing Development Fragmentation Figure 8.4: Annexation History Figure 10.1: Comprehensive Plan Direction & Implementation TABLES Tabl e 2.1: Summary of Future Land Use Acreages Tabl e 8.1: Annexation Considerations Tabl e 10.1: Action Plan & Funding Sources Contents 32 33 48 72 97 98 99 100 120 136 31 137 159 7 10 54 54 56 56 57 83 127 128 129 129 154 Page 97 of 310 OCTOBER 14, 2021 The College Station 2009-2030 Comprehensive Plan serves as a statement of the community’s vision for the future. It provides goals, policies, and actions on a broad range of topics and provides strategic direction to guide the City’s physical growth while maintaining a high quality of life. This plan is comprehensive in the true sense of the word. Every aspect of the City’s planning strategy is tied closely to the Vision created through intensive community participation. This Vision guides the City’s initiatives, organizational and departmental strategic plans, and the responsibilities of City personnel and appointed boards. The Comprehensive Plan is the broadest and most long-term policy guide for the decisions made on behalf of the community. PLAN FOUNDATION1 Page 98 of 310 5CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 1TAMU Department of Accountability 2TAMU History 3The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education 4Forbes, 2019 The Best Small Places for Business and Careers Background College Station is home to a diverse population, unique neighborhoods, quality schools, and integrated natural areas, with access to shopping, recreation, and the arts all adding to the City’s unique quality of life. College Station is located in Brazos County in south-central Texas. The City lies within the Texas Triangle formed between Dallas- Austin-San Antonio-Houston and is within a four- hour drive of more than 21 million people. College Station is also the home of Texas A&M University, the state’s first public institution of higher education. With a student enrollment over 65,6001 in fall 2020 and a 5,200 acre2 campus, the university is the largest in the state. Texas A&M University is one of only three R1 Research Universities in Texas3, meaning it engages in the highest levels of research activity, and boasts a number of degree programs ranked among the top 10 in the nation. Texas A&M University is one of a select few universities to hold the triple designation as a land-grant, sea-grant, and space-grant university – the land grant designation signifies a commitment to agricultural and mechanical education and trades, the sea-grant designation indicates dedication to the use and conservation of aquatic resources, and the space-grant designation expands opportunities for Texas A&M University students to participate in NASA-led space projects. The university brings diversity of culture, race, and nationality to College Station, reflecting much of the vibrancy, tradition, and spirit that make the City a special place. College Station businesses and residents enjoy a strong local economy. The City was recently ranked No. 2 on Forbes’ list of the best small cities for business and careers.4 The City is home to the region’s largest employer, Texas A&M University, and a significant amount of the region’s retail activities, tourist attractions, and hospitality accommodations. The City benefits from tourism fueled by collegiate sporting events at Texas A&M University and the George Bush Presidential Library and Museum, one of the region’s most popular tourist attractions with over 125,000 annual visitors. College Station’s Comprehensive Plan was created over several years and involved thousands of citizen volunteer hours. It represents how the citizens of College Station envision our community growing and changing in the future. The plan calls for an evaluation every five years that recommends appropriate plan updates. The plan was updated at the 5-year point and most recently at the 10-year mark to ensure the plan’s vision, goals, and actions incorporate changing conditions and continue to reflect our community’s vision for the future. Page 99 of 310 6CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN In the city-wide 2016 Citizen Survey, College Station residents selected “friendly people, family-friendly, good quality of life” as their top-ranked value about living in College Station.5 The City is among the safest and most family-friendly communities in Texas, consistently maintaining one of the state’s lowest crime rates. College Station is consistently recognized as one of the nation’s best college towns and within the top 10 cities for families and retirees.6 An emphasis on quality education through the College Station Independent School District and Texas A&M University contribute to the City’s vibrant, forward-thinking community. College Station also boasts nearly 2,000 acres of beautifully maintained public parks and greenway trails, miles of bicycle and pedestrian paths, sports leagues of various kinds, and entertainment programming and events, all of which contribute to the City’s high quality of life and make it the one of the most livable communities in Texas. Legal Basis The Texas Local Government Code, Section 213.002, allows municipalities to adopt a comprehensive plan for the long-range development of the municipality and to promote sound development, public health, safety, and welfare. Municipalities may define the content and design of the comprehensive plan, which may include, but is not limited to, content relating to land use, mobility, and public facilities, and may be used to coordinate and guide the establishment of development regulations. A municipality may also define the relationship between its comprehensive plan and development regulations by providing standards for determining the consistency required between the two. The City of College Station requires zoning changes to be in compliance with the adopted Comprehensive Plan. The City has established and appointed a joint Planning and Zoning Commission. The Texas Local Government Code tasks the Commission with the preparation of the Comprehensive Plan and providing a recommendation to the City Council for action. The Commission is also responsible for reviewing changes or amendments to the plan and making recommendations to the City Council. 5City of College Station 2016 Citizen Survey 6Cardrates.com (2018), Niche.com (2018), and USA Today (2013) What is the Comprehensive Plan? The Comprehensive Plan is a statement of the community's vision for the future and a guide to achieving that vision. The Comprehensive Plan anticipates and guides physical development in a manner that provides College Station with a balance of land uses that promote economic development while retaining the quality of life. The Comprehensive Plan is not a “zoning regulation” and it does not affect existing approved zoning. Instead, it provides a foundation and policy guidance in the form of text, maps, and specific actions related to land use and character, neighborhoods, housing, environment, economic development, mobility, and related topics. The plan is implemented over time through the City’s short-term strategic plans, annual budgets, ordinances, codes, and development standards. Page 100 of 310 7CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Planning Area For the purposes of this Comprehensive Plan, the planning area is shown in Figure 1.1: Planning Area and is described as the city limits of College Station and the Extraterritorial Jurisdiction (ETJ) which is a five-mile radius around the City (excluding other cities and their ETJ areas). The City is authorized by Texas Local Government Code, Section 42.021 to extend aspects of its development regulations into its ETJ. College Station’s ETJ directly abuts the ETJ of the City of Bryan to the north and lies very near the ETJ of the City of Navasota to the south. Planning History In College Station College Station has engaged in city planning since its inception in 1938. The City established its first Zoning Commission and adopted a zoning ordinance shortly after incorporation. The earliest document that resembles a comprehensive plan for the City was the Brazos Area Plan, a regional-scale plan dating from the early 1960s. The City adopted several interim reports in the mid-1970s before adopting its first City-specific plan in 1975. The first contemporary comprehensive plan was adopted in 1980 and updated in 1989. In 1997, the City adopted a new comprehensive plan, which underwent numerous updates and served as the foundation for this plan. The 2009-2030 Comprehensive Plan was originally adopted in May 2009, amended after the 5-year evaluation, and overhauled after the 10-year evaluation – which also marked the half-way point of the 20-year planning horizon – to ensure the plan incorporates changing conditions and accurately reflects our community’s vision for itself. A plan that is current and comprehensive is essential to sustaining a high quality of life. The City of College Station Comprehensive Plan builds upon the City’s previous planning efforts and will be used to guide decisions, both public and private, that will shape the City for years to come. GRIMES COUNTY BURLESON COUNTY BRYA NBRYANBRYAN COLLEGECOLLEGE STATIONSTATION COLLEGE STATION BRAZOSBRAZOS COUNTYCOUNTY BRAZOS COUNTY COLLEGECOLLEGE STATIONSTATION ETJETJ COLLEGE STATION ETJ BRYA N ETJ BRYA N ETJ What is Planning? Planning is the process that considers the physical, social, and economic aspects of the community and examines the connections between them. Planning is how we make decisions about the future of our City. The goal of planning is to further the welfare of our community by creating convenient, equitable, healthy, efficient, economically viable and attractive places for current and future generations. Figure 1.1: Planning Area Page 101 of 310 8CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Planning Process and Public Participation PLAN CREATION: 2006-2009 In 2006, the City Council initiated the process of updating the City’s 1997 Comprehensive Plan. From the beginning, the City Council worked to ensure that the plan reflected the vision and aspirations of the City’s residents and responded to the specific opportunities and challenges facing College Station at that time. The City Council used a variety of methods to engage citizens in the comprehensive planning process. In July 2006, the City Council appointed 18 citizens to the Comprehensive Plan Advisory Committee, with five additional members added in August 2008. There were 21 additional members of the Advisory Committee who represented the home building industry, Texas A&M University, the ETJ, and various area organizations and inter-governmental entities such as the City of Bryan and the Texas Department of Transportation. A Staff Resource Team was also formed as an advisory body to help facilitate coordination between City departments and aid the development of the Comprehensive Plan. As the Comprehensive Plan encompasses decades of prospective goals and actions for the City, the creation and adoption process consisted of numerous Advisory Committee meetings, Staff Resource Team discussions, public engagement opportunities, and years of refining this long-lasting document. From a series of focus group meetings with over 100 residents, to a Citizens’ Congress attracting more than 400 residents, to receiving over 2,500 completed surveys, citizen input helped develop the plan’s vision, goals, and actions. In March 2009, the City hosted two open house events to receive feedback on an overall draft of the Comprehensive Plan. With approximately 120 attendees, individual stations were set up to display the various plan elements and maps, highlight significant action recommendations, address questions, and allow informal dialogue and formal acceptance of public comments and feedback. As a part of the formal plan adoption process, a series of joint workshops with the Planning and Zoning Commission and City Council were held over several months, providing an opportunity for their detailed review and consideration of the draft plan. In May 2009, the Comprehensive Plan was formally adopted after two public hearings. 10-YEAR PLAN UPDATE: 2019-2021 The 10-year, or half-way point, of this Comprehensive Plan occurred in 2019. City staff launched a 10-year evaluation and appraisal process, branded The Next 10. It was more rigorous in scope than the previous five-year evaluation and involved multiple rounds of community input engaging over 800 citizens during a 16-month period from July 2019 to October 2020. The Next 10 provided a review of the basic conditions and assumptions related to the City’s growth, evaluated implementation progress related to the plan’s goals, strategies, and action items, and prepared the City for the major 10-year update to the plan by defining potential modifications to its goals, policies, action items, and structure. A 13-member Comprehensive Plan Evaluation Committee met throughout The Next 10 process Page 102 of 310 9CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN to provide input and feedback to guide both the substance and the process of the evaluation. The group was comprised of members of the Planning and Zoning Commission, current and former City Council members, and seven citizen representatives including an ETJ representative. A Staff Resource Team was also engaged and met regularly to ensure coordination among City departments and to work collaboratively to update the plan’s actions. A part of The Next 10 process involved considering potential best practices and planning innovations from other communities based on College Station’s issues, assets, challenges, and future opportunities. A Best Practices Report described potential strategies and case studies from other comparable communities to address topics prioritized by City leadership. Two rounds of stakeholder and community input were conducted as part of The Next 10. The first round, during the summer of 2019, began with a series of individual and small group interviews that engaged over 130 stakeholders including leaders from City departments, representatives of the County, City of Bryan, Texas A&M University, student government, economic development, business groups, neighborhood groups, realtors, builders, developers, and others. Next, the City conducted four community workshops with over 200 citizen participants who worked in small groups with trained facilitators to provide feedback on the existing Comprehensive Plan goals, issues and opportunities, and geographic locations for future planning efforts. Following these workshops, similar activities were offered online with another 200 participants, as well as a workshop convened in partnership with Texas A&M University’s student government association that engaged nearly 100 university students. In total, approximately 600 people participated in the first round of input. The second round of public input, conducted in summer 2020, obtained feedback on potential updates to future land uses and conceptual scenarios for six geographic areas of the City. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this round was conducted entirely online. A web page containing a series of maps, prompts, and videos explaining the material and expectations were used to collect data. The scenarios and their performance measures, along with the public feedback gathered were used to inform potential updates to the Comprehensive Plan and identify areas for future small area planning efforts. Approximately 200 people participated, providing over 1,900 data points. Near the end of The Next 10 evaluation process, the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted communities nationwide. While specific short-term impacts of the pandemic are still being assessed, the Comprehensive Plan sets long-term goals and policies that endure short-term disruptions. History from other disasters has taught that communities with clear long-range plans have an advantage in terms of obtaining funding and investment for recovery. Page 103 of 310 10CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN The Next 10 evaluation resulted in an evaluation and appraisal report that contained an updated vision and goals based on citizen feedback, a set of potential amendments to key maps, a list of potential strategies and actions, and recommendations to streamline and modernize the City’s Comprehensive Plan. Input from citizens, stakeholders, City staff, and the Comprehensive Plan Evaluation Committee was categorized into 10 themes that guided the evaluation and appraisal report and the subsequent plan update: 1. Creating a stronger sense of place 2. Encouraging infill and redevelopment in strategic locations 3. Protecting the character of established stable neighborhoods 4. Expanding housing choices 5. Focusing on quality of life, amenities, and “things to do” 6. Building a more complete transportation system 7. Maintaining fiscally responsible growth 8. Addressing environmental resiliency and “green” initiatives 9. Improving coordination between the City and University 10. Creating a more actionable, strategic, and user-friendly Plan The 10-year update to the plan implements these recommendations to update the vision, goals, actions, and plan narrative to incorporate changing conditions and ensure the plan continues to reflect the citizens’ vision for the future of College Station. Figure 1.2: The Comprehensive Plan: City-Wide Direction COMPREHENSIVE PLANOverall city- wide direction Focused planning Implementation Master Plans Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) Departmental Work Programs & Budget Codes & OrdinancesCity Council Strategic Plan District & Neighborhood Plans Page 104 of 310 11CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Vision for the Future A vision statement reflects the community’s desires for the future – and is one of the most important parts of the Comprehensive Plan. This statement was developed through input from hundreds of community residents. College Station, the proud home of Texas A&M University and the heart of Aggieland, will serve as an example of a vibrant, forward-thinking, knowledge-based community, that promotes the highest quality of life. The vision statement is the starting point for the Comprehensive Plan. The following plan narrative, maps, and actions derive their principal direction from the vision. Topic-specific goals and actions build upon the vision statement. The Comprehensive Plan is further supported by several focused master plans, district, and neighborhood plans. Collectively, these planning efforts are implemented by a multitude of policies, City Council strategic initiatives, annual budgets, capital improvement programming, the City’s organizational and departmental strategic plans, and City ordinances, codes, and development standards, as depicted in Figure 1.2: The Comprehensive Plan: City-Wide Direction and further discussed in Chapter 10: Plan Implementation. These efforts culminate in the individual actions and responsibilities of the City Council, the City’s staff, and appointed citizen boards and commissions. Plan Goals & Structure The Comprehensive Plan is of interest to City residents, home buyers, investors, developers, students, business owners, and others interested in how College Station proposes to respond to the opportunities and challenges likely to appear in the next 10 years. The plan narrative is divided into topic-based chapters which each containing a specific goal that builds upon the City’s vision statement, along with narrative, maps, and strategic and ongoing actions crafted to provide direction to realize the community’s vision. Each goal and a summary of the chapter is provided below. CHAPTER 2: DISTINCTIVE PLACES GOAL: Vibrant and distinct districts, attractive neighborhoods, revitalized gateways and corridors, and conserved natural areas, grounded in environmental stewardship and resiliency. This chapter establishes effective planning strategies for future growth, infill, and appropriate redevelopment while balancing market opportunities, protecting and enhancing neighborhood character, creating and preserving unique districts and corridors, protecting natural areas, and creating a more resilient community. Sound planning ensures that the City can accommodate needed development, that development can be adequately served with public services, and that its impacts can be managed to maintain compatibility and to promote the desired character and identity. Along with the narrative and actions in this chapter, Map 2.1, Planning Areas, Map 2.2, Future Land Use & Character, and Map 2.3, Community Assets & Image Corridors depict the strategies visually. Page 105 of 310 12CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CHAPTER 3: STRONG NEIGHBORHOODS GOAL: Viable and attractive neighborhoods that maintain long-term neighborhood integrity while collectively providing a wide range of housing options and other services for a diverse population. This chapter encourages attractive, livable neighborhoods that meet the City’s housing needs. Issues such as compatibility of adjacent land uses, housing affordability, housing conditions and property maintenance, and historic preservation all impact the quality and stability of neighborhoods. The focus of this chapter is the continued viability and long-term protection of College Station’s residential neighborhoods. CHAPTER 4: A PROSPEROUS ECONOMY GOAL: A diversified economy with a wide variety of competitive jobs and support for entrepreneurs that provides a tax base to support the City’s ability to foster a high quality of life where economic prosperity is widespread. This chapter of the Comprehensive Plan was replaced by the Economic Development Master Plan, originally adopted by the City Council in 2013 and updated in May 2020. The master plan ensures future growth and development advances the City’s economic development objectives. CHAPTER 5: ENGAGING SPACES GOAL: Highly desirable parks, greenways, arts and cultural amenities that support high-quality experiences for residents and visitors. This chapter recognizes and ensures the continued protection and enhancement of leisure, recreation, and cultural opportunities available to the residents of College Station through parks, greenways, and the arts. The City recognizes the value of environmental sustainability and seeks to be a good steward of natural resources. This chapter provides policy guidance, actions, and sets the framework for the City’s parks and recreation system and greenways programs, and serves as the foundation for efforts further detailed in the Recreation, Park, and Open Space Master Plan and the Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan. Page 106 of 310 13CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CHAPTER 6: INTEGRATED MOBILITY GOAL: An innovative, safe, and well-connected, multi-modal mobility system serving all user types that is designed to support the surrounding land uses. This chapter ensures orderly and integrated development of the community’s mobility network. The City strives to provide for all mobility modes to accommodate bicyclists, pedestrians, transit users, and motorists in an inclusive and context sensitive manner. This chapter includes Map 6.3, Thoroughfare Plan – Functional Classification & Context Zones, which identifies the mobility network’s future needs. It also serves as the foundation for the Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan. CHAPTER 7: EXCEPTIONAL SERVICES GOAL: Exceptional municipal facilities and services that meet community needs, contribute to community character, exhibit environmental stewardship and resiliency, support surrounding land uses, incorporate full life-cycle costs, and are coordinated and fiscally responsible. This chapter details the complexity of municipal service delivery and the provision of community facilities. It recognizes the City’s current service levels and future service needs for water and wastewater infrastructure, solid waste and recycling, police, fire, and other services. It provides the foundation for the creation and implementation of the City’s various master plans and departmental strategic plans that are intended to support the planned growth and development patterns described in Chapter 2: Distinctive Places. CHAPTER 8: MANAGED GROWTH GOAL: Fiscally responsible and carefully managed development that is aligned with growth expectations and the ability to provide safe, timely, and efficient infrastructure and services. This chapter establishes the policy guidance and associated actions that enable the City of College Station to manage its ongoing physical growth and development in a sensible, predictable, and fiscally responsible manner. It highlights the need to encourage additional infill development, accommodate increased population in denser areas, pursue strategic development agreements or annexations, and manage growth in the ETJ. Page 107 of 310 14CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CHAPTER 9: COLLABORATIVE PARTNERSHIPS GOAL: Well-coordinated planning at all levels and effective engagement with local jurisdictions, institutions, and organizations to further realize the City’s vision and support the broad community. This chapter highlights the importance of continuing and expanding internal and external collaborative partnerships between the City of College Station and other local organizations and jurisdictions. It highlights partnerships with Texas A&M University, the City of Bryan, non-profit organizations, and numerous regional counties on topics such as planning for affordable housing, an efficient regional mobility system, and coordinated emergency management efforts. CHAPTER 10: PLAN IMPLEMENTATION The final chapter establishes accountability for the implementation of the Comprehensive Plan and provides guidance on the processes to maintain its relevance to the City and its citizens. It details a practical, prioritized, and sequenced implementation program and a protocol for regular reporting and evaluating implementation progress. Page 108 of 310 15CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Existing & Changing Conditions In the development of a comprehensive plan, it is important to have a solid foundation on which to base future expectations. The Existing Conditions Report, an appendix to this plan, provides detailed background, trends, projections, and assumptions that serve as a base for the plan. The plan chapters also contain updated data points and discuss trends between 2009 and 2020, the first half of this Comprehensive Plan’s planning horizon. In 2009, the Comprehensive Plan forecasted a population of 134,000 by 2030. Based on current City projections, the population as of Census Day (April 1) 2020 was already 123,306. Due to a faster pace of growth than originally projected, the City now anticipates a population of 162,500 by 2030 based on a 2.8% annual growth rate. Texas A&M University’s increasing student enrollment continues to be a significant driver of this growth. The finalized 2020 Census results have not been released as of the publication date of the 10-year plan update. It will be important to continue monitoring growth trends, including enrollment increases at Texas A&M University, to anticipate and plan for growth. Planning for balanced land uses, housing options, mobility choices, infrastructure investments, and quality of life amenities will be critical to serving a growing and diversifying population. More information on growth trends and projections can be found in Chapter 8: Managed Growth. The City must continue to evaluate and react to market conditions, and potentially find new ways to incentivize development, infill, and redevelopment in appropriate areas. Nationally, there is expected to be continued demand for walkable, integrated, mixed-use districts and the City should encourage infill and redevelopment opportunities to support this type of development. There are many existing underutilized areas where infill and redevelopment could create more viable and vibrant places. As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to unfold, there may be additional opportunities and areas that are ripe for redevelopment or revitalization efforts. The City must prioritize proactive infrastructure investments and programs in strategic redevelopment and infill areas to catalyze redevelopment activity, promote more efficient use of infrastructure, and support the City’s environmental resiliency goals. Page 109 of 310 16CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN There are growth opportunities on the City’s edge, but also challenges with providing well-timed infrastructure improvements that support long-term financial wellbeing for the City. The City must be strategic with its future investments in infrastructure, facilities, and services. In 2019, the Texas State Legislature changed how cities can annex, essentially requiring consent by the residents and/or property owners within the potential annexation area. With limited opportunity for annexation, the City will need to continue utilizing other growth management tools to strategically manage growth pressures on the City’s fringe. A renewed emphasis on infill and redevelopment opportunities will be increasingly important as the City absorbs and manages continued population growth and becomes denser in appropriate areas. The following snapshot includes updated data, trends, and changing conditions that are further discussed throughout the plan chapters. DATA SNAPSHOT Population Growth1 • Average annual growth rate of 3.03% from 2000 to 2010 • Average annual growth rate of 2.77% from 2010 to 2020 • Population projected to be approximately 162,500 by 2030 Texas A&M University Growth2 • Average 1.65% annual increase in enrollment since 2000 • Student enrollment of 65,684 as of fall 2020 Age of Population3 • Median age is 23, reflecting the large number of university students • 41.8% of the population is between the age of 15 to 24 • People aged 55 and older grew from 7,960 in 2010 to 14,607 in 2019 Household Size and Composition4 • 48% of households are family households • 24.4% of households are families with children under 18 years old • 52% of households are non-family households • For non-family households between the ages of 15-34, 20.6% are householders not living alone (i.e. with roommates) and 17.3% are householders living alone 1City of College Station Planning & Development Services 2TAMU Accountability and TAMU Data & Research Services 3U.S. Census Bureau, 2019 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimate 4U.S. Census Bureau, 2019 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimate Page 110 of 310 17CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Income5 • Household incomes greater than $50,000 are up from 37.7% in 2010 to 47.2% in 2019 • Median household income is $45,820 • Mean household income is $73,853 Housing • Total housing stock is 46,353 units6 • 6,675 permits for new single-family home construction were issued between 2010 and 20207 • Average home price rose to over $241,600 in 2019–up from $170,400 in 20108 • Average monthly real estate inventory was 2.8 months in 20209 • Total number of sales annually has increased over 21.3% in the past year10 Housing Occupancy11 • Occupancy rate of 87.1% for all housing types • 37.7% of housing units are owner-occupied • 62.3% of housing units are renter-occupied • 43.9% of people live in detached single-family homes Employment12 • The top five employment sectors are: educational services, accommodation and food services, retail trade, health care and social assistance, professional, scientific, and technical services • Major employers: Texas A&M University, College Station Independent School District, Reynolds & Reynolds, City of College Station, Scott & White, St. Joseph Health, HEB Grocery, Walmart, Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies, and Viasat Parks and Greenways13 • Nearly 2,000 acres of parks and greenways, an increase of more than 600 acres since 2009 • Facilities include a variety of athletic fields and courts, pavilions, biking and walking trails, exercise stations, playgrounds, dog parks, senior centers, swimming pools, an amphitheater and festival site, a skate park, a full-service recreation center, a nature center, and an inventory of flat fields and diamonds College Station Independent School District14 • 11 elementary schools, two intermediate schools, three middle schools, one alternative campus, and three high schools • 13,941 students enrolled in College Station ISD schools during the 2019-2020 school year 5U.S. Census Bureau, 2019 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimate 6U.S. Census Bureau, 2019 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimate 7City of College Station Planning & Development Services 8U.S. Census Bureau, 2019 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimate 9Bryan-College Station Regional Association of Realtors 10Bryan-College Station Regional Association of Realtors 11U.S. Census Bureau, 2019 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimate 12City of College Station Economic Development & Tourism Department 13City of College Station Parks & Recreation Department 14College Station Independent School District Page 111 of 310 The Comprehensive Plan sets the framework to create distinctive places, strong neighborhoods, a prosperous economy, and engaging natural spaces and arts for everyone in College Station. The plan provides policy direction for an integrated mobility network, exceptional City services, and carefully managed, fiscally responsible growth. Effective collaboration across City departments and with regional partners is key to achieve and implement the plan’s vision, goals, and actions. The plan strives to identify, create, conserve, and connect places of distinction – those areas that make College Station unique and contribute to the City’s character and sense of place. DISTINCTIVE PLACES2 OCTOBER 14, 2021 Page 112 of 310 19CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Goal Vibrant and distinct districts, attractive neighborhoods, revitalized gateways and corridors, and conserved natural areas, grounded in environmental stewardship and resiliency. Purpose How land is used – including its appearance, physical arrangement, and development intensity – contributes significantly to the community’s character and its sense of place with far-reaching and long- term impacts. The City must balance and encourage infill, redevelopment, and new development in appropriate areas to accommodate an increasing population while maintaining the integrity and character of established neighborhoods. Revitalization, where needed, is also essential to maintaining College Station’s character. Sound planning ensures that the City can accommodate needed development, that development can be adequately served with public services, and that its impacts can be managed to maintain compatibility and to promote the character desired by College Station’s residents. Planning establishes effective strategies for future growth, infill, and appropriate redevelopment while balancing market opportunities, protecting and enhancing neighborhood character, creating and preserving unique districts and corridors, conserving natural areas, and creating a more resilient community. The 10-year update to the Comprehensive Plan places a renewed focus on infill and redevelopment in strategic locations to accommodate population growth while ensuring the long-term fiscal sustainability of the City. Infill and redevelopment opportunities more efficiently utilize existing infrastructure, facilities, and City staff resources by encouraging growth in areas with existing capacity to maximize efficiency. The Comprehensive Plan contains future land use categories that serve as policy guides and set expectations for how land within the City should be developed and used in the future. The terms future land use and zoning often get confused, but they are separate tools and processes. Future land use serves as a guide for how areas of the City may develop in the future. In contrast, zoning regulates how a specific property can be developed and used today. Map 2.2, Future Land Use & Character is used to guide decisions about infrastructure investment and zoning changes. This chapter serves as the plan’s foundation and encompasses many interrelated components as land use and development patterns are fundamental to the other topic chapters including creating strong neighborhoods (Chapter 3), a prosperous economy (Chapter 4), engaging natural spaces and arts (Chapter 5), an integrated mobility network (Chapter 6), exceptional City services (Chapter 7), and carefully managed, fiscally responsible growth (Chapter 8). Effective collaboration across City departments and with regional partners (Chapter 9) is vital to achieve and implement the plan’s vision, goals, and actions (Chapter 10). Page 113 of 310 20CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN This chapter includes a series of maps that depict the City’s land use strategies and goals visually, including Map 2.1, Planning Areas, Map 2.2, Future Land Use & Character, and Map 2.3, Community Assets & Image Corridors. Planning Considerations Planning input from the community identified various issues and opportunities regarding land use planning, conservation of natural features, and enhanced community identity and aesthetics. The considerations highlighted in this section were used in the development of the goal and action recommendations that follow. GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT College Station is poised for continued population growth, which will bring demands for additional housing, shopping, recreational needs, public facilities, infrastructure, and services. University students continue to make up a significant portion of the population, but College Station is also diversifying in age–those aged 55 and over are the fastest-growing cohort, increasing by 83.5 percent over the last decade. The City of College Station is projected to increase by approximately 35,000 people over the next decade for a total population estimated to be 162,500 by 2030. The housing demand associated with this population growth is approximately 14,000 additional dwelling units. When factoring in assumed build-out of all existing and known development projects, there is a gap of approximately 10,000 dwelling units. This additional housing stock could come from a combination of infill development, redevelopment projects in existing areas, and new developments. This housing stock must include a variety of housing types to meet the needs and demands of all residents including students, young professionals, families and non-family households, renters and homeowners, and the retiree and 55 and older population, with an emphasis on aging-in-place. For reference, the City had a net gain of approximately 12,800 housing units over the last decade, with 6,500 single-family residences and 6,300 multi-family units added.1 If population and housing demands continue to increase and state legislation restricting annexation remains in effect, the City will naturally face a greater need for increased density in appropriately targeted areas. This presents an exciting opportunity to thoughtfully plan for a variety of neighborhoods that accommodate a wide range of lifestyles for College Station residents. Though the current population density at slightly more than 2,400 persons per square mile remains low in comparison to other metropolitan areas, the need for increased density offers opportunities for reinvigorating strategic areas and reimagining the way that new neighborhoods are designed. The City’s enviable growth prospects necessitate more effective land use planning and capital investments, as well as diversified housing types including vertical mixed-use apartments, townhomes, and dense single-family neighborhoods. 1Data provided by City of College Station Planning & Development Services Page 114 of 310 21CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN COMMUNITY CHARACTER, SUSTAINABILITY & URBAN DESIGN College Station residents are interested in the character of their neighborhoods, special districts, corridors, and natural areas that collectively make College Station unique. Effective design also helps to create places of distinction – places worth remembering and protecting – and contributes significantly to quality of life. The design of streetscapes and building fronts as well as the treatment of parking and other physical features all impact how people experience the public realm. This plan speaks to the urban form of the City (where, when, and how land uses are developed) as well as public realm design (sometimes called urban design) and its impact on community character and identity. Residents expressed the desire to preserve natural features for their environmental functions as well as their contribution to the community’s character, with an emphasis on ensuring that the use or enjoyment of existing resources does not compromise resource availability for future residents. This is generally recognized as the definition of sustainability – meeting the needs of current generations without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Combining these desires for unique places, quality urban design, and development patterns that are sensitive to resident needs and natural resources, along with the efficient use of infrastructure and City resources, provides a defined vision to make College Station a more livable and sustainable community. As College Station grows, it is the residents’ and City’s intent that: • Infill and redevelopment in strategic locations is prioritized over expansion of the urban area, is sensitive to existing neighborhoods, and engages residents in infill and redevelopment planning. • Growth occurs in a sustainable manner to steward limited resources in an efficient and responsible manner that accommodates an increasing population and mitigates negative impacts on the natural and built environment. Compact development patterns help minimize sprawl and its associated impacts and makes sound economic sense for infrastructure provision and City services (see Chapter 8: Managed Growth). • New or enhanced residential areas are created with qualities of traditional neighborhoods that feature a mix of housing types, a balance of owner and renter occupants, where parks and open space are provided, neighborhood-serving businesses are accessible, and adjacent neighborhoods and areas are connected in a seamless fashion (see Chapter 3: Strong Neighborhoods). • Existing neighborhoods are conserved, enhanced, or revitalized with harmonious improvements, infill development, and compatible adjacent land uses that enhance the established neighborhood’s character (see Chapter 3: Strong Neighborhoods). • Unique corridors and districts are developed, enhanced, and conserved that foster vibrant places, streets, and natural corridors that contribute to the community’s character and sense of place. • Rural areas are preserved to protect streams, trees, pastures, and open areas that contribute significantly to the character of rural areas. • Natural resources are managed and conserved through sound stewardship practices to protect streams, wooded areas, and open spaces that provide habitat for a variety of plants and wildlife, convey and clean stormwater, improve air quality, and add to the City’s character and identity (see Chapter 5: Engaging Spaces). Page 115 of 310 22CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN • Sustainable site design and low impact development practices are utilized to mitigate stormwater and prevent flooding, avoid soil erosion and mitigate urban heat island effect, encourage tree preservation and planting programs, reduce energy consumption and pursue renewable technologies, conserve and reuse water, encourage native and adapted vegetation, and minimize waste and resource consumption, among others. • Multiple mobility mode options are available to access neighborhoods, major employers and attractions, and the wider community, and streets are designed in a context-sensitive manner. The design of a street should be a function of both its role as a mobility corridor and its place context (see Chapter 6: Integrated Mobility). • Streetscapes are designed at a human- scale and contribute positively to the way people navigate and experience the City. Effective streetscapes prioritize elements like wide sidewalks, pedestrian-scaled streetlights, wayfinding signs, and canopy trees. New district and corridor plans, as well as context-sensitive street design, will help elevate streets from utilitarian elements of the community to special places in their own right. • Public facilities are located and designed to contribute to community character and make a statement about the community’s values and expectations. A well-designed library or community center fits into a neighborhood, enabling residents to walk safely from their homes and providing a place for neighbors to gather, and contributes positively to that neighborhood’s character and reinforces the public facility as an integral part of the community. • Public spaces are highly visible and accessible to all residents and visitors. Public spaces like plazas, amphitheaters, and pedestrian malls that are well designed and safe foster social interactions and community identity. Page 116 of 310 23CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Existing Land Use Future land use and character is grounded in the current use of land and the prevailing character. An overview of the current conditions is necessary prior to forming policies for the future use of land and community character. College Station can be readily divided into three basic types of existing land use patterns: urban, suburban, and rural. These are common terms that should bring immediate images to mind. Attributes that define these areas contribute to the identity of College Station. Urban character is currently concentrated in the Northgate area. It includes early 20th century lot-line commercial structures such as those along either side of College Main, and immediately north of University Drive (FM 60). More recently constructed structured parking and multi-story residential projects built close to the street continue this urban feel. This area includes vertical, mixed-use development, minimal setbacks, minimal surface parking lots, and a high level of pedestrian activity. Suburban character dominates College Station largely due to the time period most of the City was developed (post-World War II), local preferences and building customs, and the dominance of apartment- style development to support the student population. Much of this suburban character is auto-dominated and consists of land uses that have extensive areas of parking in relationship to their floor area. Big-box retail areas and shopping malls are quintessential examples of this character. Most apartment complexes, duplexes, and single-family residential developments exhibit similar auto-oriented character and design. Some suburban areas of the City exhibit a less auto- dependent and more walkable character. These areas retain a balance between green areas (parks and open space) and the built environment. Often these areas include parks, schools, and small-scale, neighborhood- serving businesses. The College Hills area is a good example of this type of suburban character. There are also suburban areas that are dominated by open space. These estate areas exhibit a more rural character with homes generally placed on large lots. The Foxfire subdivision is a good example of this type of suburban land use and character. Rural areas that currently exist in and around College Page 117 of 310 24CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Station are areas that exhibit countryside, agricultural, and natural character. Countryside is typically dominated by a few lots of estate size or greater fronting a road surrounded by agricultural or natural lands. The latter two tend to be determined by uses – crop or ranching in agricultural areas and wooded or savannah lands in natural areas. Rural areas tend to be more sensitive than other character areas to intrusions from incompatible development. Portions of the City and most of the ETJ are planned to remain rural and are identified accordingly on Map 2.2, Future Land Use & Character. Additional information about these areas is contained in Chapter 8: Managed Growth. Future Land Use The plan for future uses of land is presented through policy guidance and associated maps. Three significant land use components work in tandem to identify, create, conserve, and connect places of distinction – those areas that make College Station unique and contribute to the City’s character and sense of place. These components are: Planning Areas, Future Land Use & Character, and Community Assets & Images Corridors. Each component is visually represented by an associated map. Combined, the narrative and maps capture the City’s policies regarding how and where College Station will grow and change over the course of the next decade. • Map 2.1, Planning Areas depicts areas within the city with distinctive character that have existing small area plans or are priority areas for future focused planning efforts. • Map 2.2, Future Land Use & Character provides specific detail regarding the desired future use and character of all land within the City and ETJ. • Map 2.3, Community Assets & Image Corridors visually portrays community assets, both natural and man-made, that contribute to the character and identity of the City. Page 118 of 310 25CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN PLANNING AREAS The policy guidance within this section and Map 2.1, Planning Areas are intended to provide a broad overview of the City’s land use strategy. Significant neighborhoods, districts, corridors, redevelopment areas, and places that would benefit from future small area planning efforts are identified. Small area plans are focused planning efforts that provide a more granular level of study and specific actions for a smaller, defined geographic area to help implement the Comprehensive Plan’s overarching goals. The City has several existing small areas plans and identified priority areas for additional planning efforts through recent citizen input and the 10-year plan update. The basic land use strategy is to strategically accommodate the projected demand for new housing, businesses, public facilities, and infrastructure needs resulting in multiple places of distinction. This enables the City to continually strengthen its principal competitive advantage for attracting and retaining residents, visitors, and new businesses along with the employment and tax revenues that accompany them – that is, a high quality of life. The land use strategy and planning areas focus on identifying, creating, conserving, and connecting: • Strong and sustainable neighborhoods • Unique districts and corridors, both natural and man-made • Redevelopment areas that renew, revitalize, and infill underperforming areas of the community through partnerships with public and private interests • Rural areas that preserve open spaces and respect the limits of public infrastructure and services, and • A context sensitive mobility system that links the community together (as discussed in Chapter 6: Integrated Mobility and visually represented through the Thoroughfare Plan and Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan) Neighborhoods & Districts Neighborhood planning areas are places in which the current land use, character, and identity will generally remain and be enhanced. Among other activities, these plans identify appropriate and compatible land uses and design for vacant lands within the neighborhood and its area of influence. They also designate areas appropriate for redevelopment. Neighborhood plans typically contain strategies that address existing challenges (for example, code issues) and identify enhancement actions (such as pedestrian or park improvements). Page 119 of 310 26CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN District planning areas present opportunities for a mix of appropriate uses that enhance the unique characteristics of a defined area of the City. Existing examples include the Wellborn Community Plan which centers on the unique, rural character of the Wellborn area and the Medical District Master Plan which focuses on creating a cohesive healthcare and wellness district. Over the last 10 years, citizens, staff, and City leadership worked together to create seven neighborhood and district plans. These plans provide strategic recommendations for an area within a defined timeframe (typically seven years). Once adopted, those recommendations are either implemented over the planning period, incorporated into relevant parts of the Comprehensive Plan, or additional planning efforts may emerge due to changed conditions. Occasionally, some action items are not pursued due to changed conditions or waning neighborhood interest. Many of the existing neighborhood plans are now outside of their original planning timeframes. The City should establish a formal process for reviewing neighborhood plans at defined intervals to assess what was achieved relative to the plan’s recommendations, what was not achieved (and why), and whether additional planning efforts are needed for an area. • Planning Area 1: Eastgate Neighborhood Plan – Adopted in June 2011, this neighborhood plan covers approximately 567 acres in one of the City’s older neighborhoods along the eastern edge of Texas A&M University. • Planning Area 2: Southside Area Neighborhood Plan – Adopted in September 2012, this neighborhood plan covers approximately 720 acres in one of the City’s oldest neighborhoods along the southern edge of Texas A&M University. • Planning Area 3: South Knoll Neighborhood Plan – Adopted in September 2013, this neighborhood plan covers over 3,500 acres within the City’s core. • Planning Area 4: Central College Station Neighborhood Plan – Adopted in June 2010, this neighborhood plan covers approximately 1,450 acres in the geographic center of the City. • Planning Area 5: Wellborn Community Plan – Adopted in April 2013, this plan encompasses 929 acres in the southwestern portion of the City, including much of the historic Wellborn community and focuses on retaining the rural character of the area. However, conditions have changed in recent years and the community is facing continued development pressures for growth that may now be appropriate, in contrast with the existing plan direction. A renewed planning effort in the Wellborn area is needed. • Planning Area 6: Medical District Master Plan - Adopted in October 2012, the Medical District Master Plan creates a focused healthcare and wellness district that includes the City’s major hospitals and medical facilities. This area is generally located along State Highway 6 near the Rock Prairie Road interchange, which is one of the primary gateways into the City as one approaches from the south. The plan links medical facilities into a cohesive district with supporting commercial and residential areas that are being realized through the Midtown Reserve & City Center master planned development. The City-owned Midtown Business Park, consisting of over 250 acres, is located in this general area as well, providing economic development opportunities for office, light Page 120 of 310 27CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN and heavy-industrial, and limited commercial uses. There are also significant natural features in the area – branches of Lick Creek and Spring Creek – and these should continue to be incorporated into the district as parks, greenway trails, and open space. Future development should also continue cohesive identity elements such as signage, landscaping, and design that visually tie the district together. • Planning Area 7: Wolf Pen Creek District - This district along the Wolf Pen Creek corridor combines parks, arts, and commerce by linking a variety of private and public facilities together with an urban greenway. This area has been the subject of considerable planning efforts, including specific Wolf Pen Creek Design Standards (within the Unified Development Ordinance), and substantial public and private investment. Future planning should build upon these existing efforts to expand the district’s reach into the adjacent areas of influence, resulting in a more urban character. Redevelopment Portions of the City are identified for focused redevelopment activities. Within these areas it is anticipated that a change in use – and, if appropriate, character – requires some form of direct intervention by the City. This intervention may involve regulation (e.g., City-initiated rezoning), investment (e.g., capital expenditure on infrastructure), or incentives (e.g., fast-tracking of a project or density bonuses). This stands in contrast to areas that experience changes in use based on market opportunities alone. Some of these redevelopment areas may overlap established neighborhood areas, districts, or corridors and careful attention and cohesive planning will be needed to provide appropriate transitions between redeveloping and existing areas. • Planning Area 8: Northgate District & Redevelopment Area - This area serves as the City’s primary entertainment district and represents the City’s only current urban character area. This area has been and will continue to be the subject of considerable planning along with substantial public and private investment. These efforts should be guided by the Northgate District Design Standards (within the Unified Development Ordinance), the Mobility Study and Operations Plan, and any emerging plans for the area. Continued development and redevelopment efforts in the Northgate District should enhance the vibrant entertainment district and include vertical mixed-use projects, retail and entertainment uses, and tourist attractions. Page 121 of 310 28CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN • Planning Area 9: Texas Avenue & University Drive (FM 60) Redevelopment Area - This area includes a number of underperforming land uses that, due to their proximity to two of the busiest corridors in the City, are poised for redevelopment. Much of the area is currently subdivided into small lots, making it difficult to assemble land for redevelopment. A portion of this area includes the new City Hall site and a prime redevelopment opportunity to transition the former City Hall site into a cohesive mixed-use area that incorporates retail, office, and residential uses. The proximity of existing neighborhoods and the Texas A&M University campus requires careful site planning and building design. These efforts should be complimentary to the nearby hospitality corridor planning efforts, the Eastgate area, and the Texas A&M University Campus Master Plan while focusing on bringing vertical mixed-use and other aspects of urban character to this portion of the City. This area is consistently ranked as a high priority area for future planning efforts by residents and City leadership. • Planning Area 10: Harvey Road Redevelopment Area – This section of Harvey Road includes newer commercial areas and a number of underperforming commercial and older multi-family properties and apartment complexes. This area also includes the Post Oak Mall, which will likely need to reposition itself in the near future to remain competitive. This presents an exciting opportunity to evolve into a denser area of the City, including vertical and horizontal mixed-use developments, which could compliment the adjacent Wolf Pen Creek District. During the 10-year Comprehensive Plan evaluation, residents and City leadership expressed interest in alternative options for future redevelopment and revitalization of this area, indicating a need for additional study and engagement. • Planning Area 11: George Bush Drive & Wellborn Road (FM 2154) Redevelopment Area - This area includes a number of underperforming commercial properties and poor-quality residences that, due to planned road changes to the George Bush Drive and Wellborn Road (FM 2154) intersection along with the area’s proximity to Texas A&M University, are poised for redevelopment. Much of the area is currently subdivided into small lots, making it difficult to consolidate land for redevelopment. The presence of existing residences and businesses, and proximity to established neighborhoods and the university campus, requires careful site planning and building design. Redevelopment planning efforts should focus on bringing vertical and horizontal mixed-use and other aspects of urban character to this portion of the City, while providing contextually appropriate transitions to established areas of the Southside neighborhood. During the 10-year plan evaluation residents were divided on alternative options for this area, indicating the need for further study and public engagement. Residents strongly opposed changes to interior portions of the Southside neighborhood across from Texas A&M University, thus future planning efforts within the Southside neighborhood should center on the area surrounding the George Bush Drive and Wellborn Road (FM 2154) intersection. These planning efforts will be prioritized and synced with the proposed road changes, once the timing is known. Gateway Corridors Gateway corridors serve as functional and focal entry points into the City and its unique districts, neighborhoods, redevelopment, and natural areas. These gateway corridors are prominent routes for College Station residents and visitors alike. An effective gateway corridor establishes a positive impression and identity that reinforces the community’s character. Several of these corridors serve as a link between districts, further reinforcing their importance. Identity and beautification elements, such as decorative markers and themed wayfinding signs, should be placed along these corridors. Additionally, landscaping and streetscape elements should be unified and significant along these corridors. These corridors also offer the opportunity for the placement of public art and other design elements. Page 122 of 310 29CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN • Planning Area 12: Presidential Gateway & BioCorridor - This area located near the intersection of State Highway 47 and Raymond Stotzer Parkway (FM 60) is a main entryway into the City from the west. It is adjacent to the Texas A&M University Health Science Center, Easterwood Airport, and nearby the RELLIS Campus in Bryan. The BioCorridor contains interconnected, master planned properties specializing in corporate office, biomanufacturing, research and development, and industrial uses. The area’s character is managed and regulated jointly by the cities of College Station and Bryan largely through the BioCorridor Planned Development District. Future development should build upon existing assets in the area and continue to enhance this primary gateway into the City through cohesive design, landscaping, and signage. • Planning Area 13: Hospitality Corridor - This area along University Drive (FM 60), spanning from Tarrow Street and Fire Station #6 to the interchange at State Highway 6, is one of the main entryways into the City from the highway. A number of hotels and restaurants are currently located along this corridor. The focus of this corridor should be linking current and future hospitality facilities into a cohesive corridor along with adjacent redevelopment areas that, over time, could emerge as another urban character area. The plan should include identity elements such as signage, landscaping, and enhanced design to visually tie the corridor together. • Planning Area 14: Municipal Center Corridor - This area located along Krenek Tap Road between State Highway 6 and Texas Avenue includes Stephen C. Beachy Central Park, the original City cemetery, and several municipal facilities. The area also includes significant natural features such as Bee Creek and several wooded areas. Plans for this corridor should enhance the municipal facilities and support a mix of residential and commercial activities with an emphasis on cohesive design that integrates the natural features of the area. • Planning Area 15: Harvey Mitchell Corridor - This is an area of Harvey Mitchell Parkway (FM 2818) generally around its intersection with Texas Avenue extending eastward to State Highway 6. This area includes a significant amount of floodplain area adjacent to Bee Creek and significant road frontage along Harvey Mitchell Parkway and Texas Avenue. The focus of this plan should be the development of an urban area that incorporates the natural features of the area and design elements that positively contribute to two prominent entries into the core of the City. • Planning Area 16: Longmire & Highway 6 Frontage Road Corridor – This gateway corridor is a major entryway into the City from State Highway 6. The area is generally defined as the State Highway 6 Frontage Road at its intersection with Texas Avenue between Deacon Drive to Rock Prairie Road and west to Longmire Drive. The corridor contains a series of older, underperforming, and in many cases nonconforming, commercial and multi-family uses. As a key corridor, future planning efforts should focus on redevelopment opportunities and identity enhancements such as signage, landscaping, and design to create a more visually cohesive entryway and corridor. • Planning Area 17: Wellborn Road (FM 2154) and William D. Fitch Corridor (State Highway 40) – This area is generally the southwestern gateway into the City near the intersection of Wellborn Road (FM 2154) and William D. Fitch Parkway (State Highway 40). There is a future grade-separated crossing at the intersection of these roads that will significantly change the area’s character. The land west of the railroad and generally south of Rock Prairie Road is largely undeveloped but limited in development potential due to sewer capacity constraints. A plan for this area should focus on opportunities for visual enhancements such as signage, landscaping, and enhanced design to create a more attractive entryway, along with compatible land uses such as light industrial that can operate within existing constraints. Page 123 of 310 30CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Natural Corridors Natural corridors exhibit opportunities for resource conservation and recreational activities. Examples include the Carter Creek and Lick Creek Corridors. Each of these will be the subject of a future district or corridor plan. • Planning Area 18: Bee Creek Corridor - This corridor contains Bee Creek, which is a significant stream that traverses many neighborhoods in the core of the City. This watershed has been the location of intense development resulting in significant alteration to the stream. The focus of this corridor should be on the continued restoration of the creek, development of recreational opportunities, and expansion of its role in linking adjacent areas. • Planning Area 19: Carter Creek Corridor - This corridor consists of the entirety of Carter Creek and its associated floodplain. Carter Creek is a significant natural feature stretching along much of the eastern edge of the City and linking College Station, Bryan, and the remainder of Brazos County. The focus of this corridor should be the protection of this natural feature and development of recreational opportunities that could cohesively connect the region. • Planning Area 20: Lick Creek Corridor - This area includes Lick Creek Park and the surrounding area. Lick Creek Park is one of the most significant natural features in College Station. It offers a unique natural setting and protects much of the Lick Creek watershed along with a large, wooded area and the habitats of rare and endangered species. The focus of this corridor should be the continued protection of the natural features, additional recreational and educational opportunities, and the expansion of its role in linking adjacent areas. Page 124 of 310 31CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE LAND USE & CHARACTER Future land use serves as a guide for how all property within the City may develop in the future. Each future land use category contains a character-based description and overall intent of the category, along with generally appropriate zoning districts that help achieve the desired character. There are also example photographs from existing developments in College Station or other communities to visually illustrate the desired development characteristics. The appropriateness of zoning change requests will be considered using multiple criteria including, but not limited to, whether the request is aligned with Map 2.2, Future Land Use & Character, whether changed or changing conditions exist in the area, compatibility with existing uses and development patterns, impact on environmentally sensitive and natural areas, impact on and timing of infrastructure, and consistency with all goals and strategies of the Comprehensive Plan. The zoning districts listed as generally appropriate under each future land use category are meant to provide guidance and do not represent affirmative support of each listed zoning district. The land use strategies discussed in this chapter are further clarified by the future land use category descriptions and are visually portrayed in Map 2.2, Future Land Use & Character. The associated acreages in each land use category are compiled in Table 2.1, Summary of Future Land Use Acreages. With the 10-year Comprehensive Plan update several changes were made to the future land use categories and map based on community and stakeholder input, changing conditions, and best practices identified during the evaluation process. These changes include renaming, simplifying and reducing the number of categories, refining the land use definitions, creating new categories to encourage and support emerging development forms, and reconsidering how land uses apply to various areas of the City. The future land uses described below and applied to Map 2.2, Future Land Use & Character are meant to realize the citizens’ vision for the future of College Station. Table 2.1 - Summary of Future Land Use Acreages Future Land Use City Limits ETJ Urban Center 335.6 Neighborhood Center 1,256.8 General Commercial 1,854.5 159.4 Neighborhood Commercial 528.3 Business Center 968.0 874.0 Urban Residential 928.4 Mixed Residential 1,099.1 209.1 Suburban Residential 6,350.2 577.7 Estate Residential 2,822.7 885.0 Rural 7.8 57,785.4 Neighborhood Conservation 1,795.7 Medical 187.8 Wellborn 434.6 38.0 Institutional/Public 952.3 4.2 Texas A&M University 4,839.8 44.4 Parks & Greenways 870.4 *17.3 Natural & Open Areas 5,132.0 41,804.3 TOTALS 30,364.2 102,381.5 *Note: The 17.3 acres of Parks & Greenways in the ETJ is the park within the Southern Pointe subdivision, which will be annexed into the City in the future per their development agreement Page 125 of 310 111 2 3 444 555 666 888 999 101010 111111 121212 131313 151515 161616 171717 181818 191919 202020WILLIAM D. FITCH PKWYF M 2 1 5 4FM 2818GEORGE BUSH DRTE X A S A V E SUNIVERSITY DRS H 6 S SH 6 S TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY FLOODPLAIN 5 MILE ETJ CITY LIMITS BRYAN MAIN CORRIDORS * EXISTING PLANNING EFFORT OR DESIGN STANDARDS REDEVELOPMENT AREAS 8.NORTHGATE DISTRICT* 9.TEXAS AVENUE & UNIVERSITY DRIVE AREA 10 HARVEY ROAD AREA 11.GEORGE BUSH DRIVE & WELLBORN ROAD AREA GATEWAY CORRIDORS 12.PRESIDENTIAL GATEWAY & BIOCORRIDOR* 13.HOSPITALITY CORRIDOR* HARVEY MITCHELL CORRIDOR15. 14.MUNICIPAL CENTER CORRIDOR WELLBORN ROAD & WILLIAM D. FITCH CORRIDOR17. 16.LONGMIRE & HIGHWAY 6 FRONTAGE ROAD CORRIDOR NATURAL CORRIDORS 18.BEE CREEK CORRIDOR 19.CARTER CREEK CORRIDOR 20.LICK CREEK CORRIDOR NEIGHBORHOODS & DISTRICTS 1.EASTGATE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN* 3.SOUTH KNOLL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN* CENTRAL COLLEGE STATION NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN*4. 2.SOUTHSIDE AREA NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN* 5.WELLBORN COMMUNITY PLAN* 6.MEDICAL DISTRICT MASTER PLAN* 7.WOLF PEN CREEK DISTRICT* Planning Areas M AP 2.1 Page 126 of 310 ETJETJETJ CITY LIMITSCITY LIMITSCITY LIMITS BRYANBRYANBRYAN GEORGE BUSH DRUNIVERSITY DRSOUTH WEST PKWYTE X A S A V E S DEACON DRROCK PRAIRIE RDHARVEY RDGRAHAM RDEAGLE AVEBARRON RDHOLLEGREENS PRAIRIE RDMANDRS H 6 S S H 6 SWILLIAM D. FITCH PKWYFM 60F M 2 1 5 4FM 2818 URBAN CENTER NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER GENERAL COMMERCIAL NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL BUSINESS CENTER URBAN RESIDENTIAL MIXED RESIDENTIAL SUBURBAN RESIDENTIAL ESTATE RESIDENTIAL RURAL NEIGHBORHOOD CONSER VATION MEDICAL WELLBORN INSTITUTIONAL/PUBLIC TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY PA RKS & GREENWAY S NATURAL & OPEN AREAS REDE VELOPMENT AREAS!!!!!!Future Land Use & Character *NOTE : A COMPREHENSIVE PLAN SHALL NOT CONSTITUTE ZONING REGULATIONS OR ESTA BLISH ZONING BOUNDARIES M AP 2.2 Page 127 of 310 34CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Future Land Use Categories URBAN CENTER Areas that are appropriate for the most intense development and mix of uses arranged in a compact and walkable pattern. These areas will tend to consist of multi-story residential, commercial, and office uses that may be mixed vertically within mixed-use structures or horizontally in an integrated manner. Urban Centers should also incorporate consolidated parking facilities, access to transportation alternatives, open space and recreational facilities, and public uses. Building Height: 5 stories average Mobility: Walking, bicycling, transit, automobile Intent • Create and reinforce walkable activity centers with small blocks that are connected to surrounding development and include a mix of complementary uses • Accommodate a mix of building types including freestanding and attached structures that frame attractive pedestrian zones between buildings and streets • Encourage commercial uses along primary streets • Encourage vertical mixed-use structures with ground- floor retail in appropriate locations such as along major corridors • Support multi-family residential as a secondary component of a center • Encourage shared surface parking located behind buildings or to the side of buildings, structured parking, and on-street parking where possible Generally appropriate zoning districts: Mixed-use, Northgate zoning (in Northgate only), Wolf Pen Creek zoning (in Wolf Pen Creek only) Page 128 of 310 35CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER Areas that are appropriate for a mix of uses arranged in a compact and walkable pattern at a smaller scale than Urban Centers. These areas consist of residential, commercial, and office uses arranged horizontally in an integrated manner and may be mixed vertically within structures. Neighborhood Centers should also incorporate consolidated parking facilities, access to transportation alternatives, open space and recreational facilities, and public uses. Height: 3 stories average Mobility: Walking, bicycling, transit, automobile Intent • Create and reinforce walkable activity centers that are connected to surrounding development and include a mix of complementary uses • Accommodate a mix of building types that frame attractive pedestrian spaces • Encourage commercial uses along primary streets • Support vertical mixed-use structures with ground- floor retail in appropriate locations such as along corridors or major intersections • Support multi-family residential as a secondary component of a center • Encourage shared surface parking located behind or to the side of buildings (with some limited parking in front of buildings), structured parking, and on-street parking where possible Generally appropriate zoning districts: Mixed-use, Wolf Pen Creek zoning (in Wolf Pen Creek only) General commercial and multi-family zoning may be considered in some circumstances if designed in an integrated manner with a preferred emphasis on urban form Page 129 of 310 36CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN GENERAL COMMERCIAL Concentrated areas of commercial activities that cater to both nearby residents and to the larger community or region. Generally, these areas tend to be large and located along regionally significant roads. Due to their context, these areas tend to prioritize automobile mobility. Height: 1-2 stories average Mobility: Primarily automobile, but accessible by walking, bicycling, and transit Intent • Accommodate a wide range of commercial uses • Concentrate future commercial development at major intersections • Provide connectivity to surrounding bicycle and pedestrian networks and provide safe pedestrian facilities within sites • Encourage transitions in building height and mass when adjacent to residential neighborhoods • Support multi-family residential as secondary uses on a site • Encourage shared surface parking Generally appropriate zoning districts: General commercial, office, and mixed-use zoning Page 130 of 310 37CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL Areas of commercial activities that cater primarily to nearby residents. These areas tend to be smaller format than general commercial and located adjacent to major roads along the fringe of residential areas. Design of these structures is compatible in size, architecture, and lot coverage with surrounding residential uses. Height: 1-2 stories average Mobility: Primarily automobile, but accessible by walking, bicycling, and transit Intent • Accommodate limited commercial services compared to General Commercial • Provide pedestrian and bicycle connectivity to surrounding neighborhoods and nearby public uses (schools, parks, etc.) • Support some residential uses that are compatible with the surrounding neighborhood character • Encourage transitions in building height and mass when adjacent to residential neighborhoods • In a walkable neighborhood context, locate new buildings near the street and accommodate parking to the side or rear of buildings with some limited parking in front of buildings and accommodate on- street parking where possible Generally appropriate zoning districts: Suburban commercial and office zoning Page 131 of 310 38CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BUSINESS CENTER Areas that include office, research, or industrial uses that may be planned and developed as a unified project. Generally, these areas need convenient access to arterial roadways. Height: Varies Mobility: Primarily automobile Intent • Accommodate a variety of large footprint buildings • Accommodate commercial and service uses within Business Centers • Accommodate pedestrian, bicycle, and transit connectivity to and within Business Centers • Provide buffering through landscaping and building placement where large-scale employment sites are adjacent to residential areas Generally appropriate zoning districts: Business park, industrial, and commercial industrial zoning Page 132 of 310 39CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN URBAN RESIDENTIAL Areas that are appropriate for a range of high-density multi- family and attached residential development in various forms including townhomes, apartment buildings, mixed- use buildings, and limited non-residential uses that are compatible with the surrounding area. Height: 3 stories average Mobility: Walking, bicycling, transit, automobile Intent • Accommodate a wide range of attractive multi- family housing for a diverse population. Buildings may be clustered and grouped. Building setback from street varies but is generally consistent within a development • Provide vehicular and pedestrian connectivity between developments • Accommodate streetscape features such as sidewalks, street trees, and lighting • Support commercial, service, office uses, and vertical mixed-use within redevelopment areas Generally appropriate zoning districts: Multi-family, townhouse, mixed-use, and limited suburban commercial zoning Page 133 of 310 40CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN MIXED RESIDENTIAL Areas appropriate for a mix of moderate density residential development including, townhomes, duplexes, small multi- family buildings (3-12 unit), and limited small-lot single family. These areas are appropriate for residential infill and redevelopment that allows original character to evolve. These areas may serve as buffers between more intense multi-family residential or mixed-use development and suburban residential or neighborhood conservation areas. Height: Varies (generally 2-3 stories) Mobility: Walking, bicycling, transit, automobile Intent • Accommodate a walkable pattern of small lots, small blocks, and well-connected street pattern • Accommodate streetscape features such as sidewalks, street trees, and lighting • Encourage community facilities, parks, and greenways within neighborhoods • Support neighborhoods with a mix of housing types and where larger or more dense housing is located near community facilities or adjacent to commercial or neighborhood centers Generally appropriate zoning districts: Duplex, townhouse, middle housing, and limited-scale single-family Page 134 of 310 41CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN SUBURBAN RESIDENTIAL Primarily single-family residential areas that consist of low to moderate density single-family lots. These areas may also include limited townhomes, duplexes, other housing types, and some non-residential uses that are compatible with surrounding single-family areas. Development types tend to be highly consistent within a subdivision or neighborhood. Height: 1-2 stories Mobility: Primarily automobile, but accessible by walking, bicycling, and transit to surrounding neighborhood services and centers Intent • Accommodate streetscape features such as sidewalks, street trees, and lighting • Support neighborhoods with a mix of housing types • Encourage community facilities, parks, and greenways within neighborhoods • When establishing new residential areas or expanding existing developments, provide pedestrian and vehicular connectivity between adjacent developments Generally appropriate zoning districts: General and restricted suburban zoning Page 135 of 310 42CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN ESTATE RESIDENTIAL Primarily single-family residential areas that have a low level of development activities. These areas are appropriate for very low-density residential lots of one-acre or greater lot sizes or average 20,000 square feet lots when clustered around open space. Height: 1-2 stories Mobility: Primarily automobile Intent • Support a wide range of lot sizes, long blocks, and curvilinear streets. Buildings tend to be located greater than 30 feet from a fronting street. • When establishing new residential areas or expanding existing developments, provide pedestrian and vehicular connectivity between adjacent developments Generally appropriate zoning districts: Estate, rural, and manufactured home park zoning Page 136 of 310 43CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD CONSERVATION Residential areas that are essentially “built-out” and are not likely to be the focus of extensive infill development or redevelopment. These areas often were platted before current development regulations were in place often resulting in nonconforming situations. These areas are appropriate for overlays or zoning classifications that provide additional character protection and address nonconforming issues. Height: 1-2 stories Mobility: Walking, bicycling, transit, automobile; on-street parking and private off-street parking Intent • Maintain the existing housing stock, lot patterns, and character of neighborhoods • Support infill housing that fits-in with neighboring homes (scale, placement, use, etc.) • Address nonconforming lot issues through flexible development regulations • Maintain established trees Generally appropriate zoning districts: General and restricted suburban, single-family overlays Page 137 of 310 44CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Areas owned by Texas A&M University and are appropriate for campus development as described in the Texas A&M Campus Master Plan and related documents. INSTITUTIONAL/PUBLIC Areas that are, and are likely to remain, in some form of institutional or public activity. Examples include schools, libraries, municipal facilities, and major utilities. MEDICAL Areas appropriate for medically related uses and supporting office, commercial, and residential uses. The medical land use designation surrounding Rock Prairie and State Highway 6 is further detailed in the Medical District Master Plan, which envisions a wide array of medical and supporting services and activities concentrated in the district. This includes the two major hospitals in close proximity to residential neighborhoods, neighborhood centers, offices, and commercial uses. Height: Varies Mobility: Walking, bicycling, transit, automobile Generally appropriate zoning districts: Varies WELLBORN The Wellborn Community Plan envisions the future of Wellborn to maintain its rural character with open space that is both privately and publicly held. The area will continue as a place where neighborhood commercial uses support surrounding low-density residential properties. Height: Varies Mobility: Primarily automobile Zoning districts: Wellborn zoning districts, as appropriate and specified in the Wellborn Community Plan Page 138 of 310 45CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN PARKS & GREENWAYS Areas that are permanently protected from development. Such areas are preserved for their natural function or for parks, recreation, or greenways opportunities. These areas include, publicly owned open space, conservation easements, greenway trails, and public parks. NATURAL & OPEN AREAS This land use designation is generally for areas that represent a constraint to development and that should be conserved for their natural function or open space qualities. These areas include floodplains, riparian buffers, common areas, and open space. The boundaries of the Natural & Open Areas land use are illustrative, and the exact location of floodplains and other physical constraints are determined during the development process. Generally appropriate zoning districts Natural areas protected RURAL Areas that, due to public service limitations, inadequate public infrastructure, or a prevailing rural or agricultural character, should have very limited development activities. These areas will tend to include a mix of large acreages (ranches and farmsteads) and limited large-lot (two acre or larger) residential developments. Open space is the dominant feature of these areas. Height: Varies Mobility: Primarily automobile Generally appropriate zoning districts Rural and manufactured home park zoning Page 139 of 310 46CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Community Assets & Images Corridors The physical design and appearance of the built environment – what buildings, streets, and parks look like – contributes significantly to the character and identity of the City. This section identifies many of the community’s unique assets and provides general policy guidance regarding suburban and urban design, streets and streetscape design, public buildings and facilities, image corridors, and gateways. More specific and detailed guidance will be provided through subsequent neighborhood, district, and corridor plans, as well as master plans and other studies and plans adopted by the City Council. COMMUNITY ASSETS College Station has a number of existing assets (both natural and man-made) that contribute significantly to the character and identity of the City and, thus, are deserving of identification and worthy of policy guidance. Map 2.3, Community Assets & Image Corridors, visually portrays these assets which include natural features such as Carter Creek and Lick Creek, connections to the greater region such as Easterwood Airport, public facilities such as the Texas A&M University campus and Veterans Park, and various vistas and views. Care should be taken to protect each of these assets from encroachment by incompatible land uses and from insensitive development activities that would compromise their contribution to the area’s character and identity. IMAGE CORRIDORS Image corridors are delineated on Map 2.3, Community Assets & Image Corridors, reflecting their importance as routes that many residents and visitors travel and, along the way, form impressions of College Station. Several of these corridors serve as a link between districts, further reinforcing their importance. Identity and beautification elements, such as decorative markers and themed wayfinding signs, should be placed along these corridors. Additionally, landscaping and streetscape elements should be unified and significant along these corridors. These corridors also offer the opportunity for the placement of public art and other design elements. Primary image corridors include corridors that carry high volumes of traffic and move travelers through or along some of the City’s most significant assets. Examples include State Highway 6, Texas Avenue, and Wellborn Road (FM 2154). Secondary image corridors include corridors that tend to carry slightly less traffic volume and move travelers mainly through the community’s significant business or residential areas. Examples include Rock Prairie Road, Harvey Road (FM 30), and portions of University Drive (FM 60). Image corridors also offer an opportunity to support the City’s resource conservation objectives through the preservation of open space and other natural features along these key corridors. Where these corridors cross streams, go through forested areas, or offer attractive vistas, care should be taken in how bridges are constructed, banks are stabilized, stormwater is managed, trees are protected, and views are kept unobstructed to maximize the positive impressions gained by these assets. GATEWAYS A gateway serves as the symbolic entry point to an area, whether the City, a neighborhood, or a district. An effective gateway establishes an immediate positive impression that reinforces the character of an area and is visually harmonious with its surroundings. The key gateways into these areas need specific design elements and enhancements to create such an experience. For neighborhoods this may be in the form of landscaping or an entrance monument. For districts and corridors this may be in the form of landscaping, Page 140 of 310 47CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN streetscape, special lighting, signage, public art, or building design. Along the image corridors at key entry points to the City this may be in the form of landscaping, special signage, public art, or enhancements to bridges and overpasses. Each of the neighborhood area plans, district plans, and corridor plans should address the most effective means to enhance associated gateways. This section outlines the framework for the most appropriate manner to address the key gateways into and out of the City as a whole. This plan identifies three levels of gateways, each with its own specific purpose and related design focus. Early Image-Setting Gateways are locations where those approaching the community can first be engaged and experience College Station’s unique identity. These areas offer opportunities for tasteful signage and landscaping that are harmonious with the surrounding rural areas while announcing one’s pending arrival into College Station. Examples of appropriate locations for such enhancements are the intersection of University Drive/Raymond Stotzer Parkway (FM 60) and Wellborn Road (FM 2154), the FM 60 crossing of the Brazos River, and the intersection of State Highway 47 and Raymond Stotzer Parkway (FM 60). Secondary Welcoming Gateways are locations where community identity and themes can be reinforced through more substantial enhancements. These may include significant monument signage, substantial areas of landscaping and tree planting, and flags. Generally, these are located within the city limits but prior to arrival in the core of the City itself. Examples of appropriate locations for such enhancements are the Rock Prairie Road interchange with State Highway 6, the intersection of George Bush Drive and Harvey Mitchell Parkway (FM 2818), and the city limits at South College Avenue. Primary Arrival Gateways are locations where the most substantial enhancements should be installed. These may include significant monument signage, substantial areas of landscaping and tree planting, fountains, lighted icons, and large-scale art. Examples of appropriate locations for such enhancements are the intersection of Texas Avenue and State Highway 6, the University Drive/Raymond Stotzer Parkway (FM 60) interchange with Harvey Mitchell Parkway (FM 2818), and the intersection of Texas Avenue and University Drive (FM 60). For these gateways to succeed, it is essential that common elements be used throughout each of the three levels. Further, enhancements should be focused and sized properly to have the intended impact. Enhancements dispersed over a wide area, lacking common elements, and sized inappropriately will have less of an impact and will miss a critical opportunity to reinforce the character and identity of College Station. Page 141 of 310 M AP 2.3 GEORGE BUSH DRGEORGE BUSH DRGEORGE BUSH DRG3 G3 G3 G3 G3 G2 G2 G2 G2 G2 G2 G2 G2 G2G2 G1 G1 G1 G1 G1 G1 A&M Campus Vista A&M Vista Open Vista (A&M Land) at FM 60 and Brazos River View From High Point Open Space Views at SH 6 and FM 2154 WOLFWOLFWOLF PENPENPEN CRECRECREEEEKKK BEEBEEBEE CREEKCREEKCREEK SPRINGSPRINGSPRINGCREEKCREEKCREEK LIC K LIC K LIC K CRE E K CRE E K CRE E K CAR T E R CAR T E R CAR T E R CRE E K CRE E K CRE E K CA R T E R CA R T E R CA R T E R CR E E K CR E E K CR E E K G2 New Memorial Cemetery and Aggie Field of Honor Easterwood Airport Te xas A&M University Campus BRAZOS R IVERBRAZOS R IVER NAVASOTANAVASOTANAVASOTARIVERRIVERRIVERTE X A S A V E S TE X A S A V E S TE X A S A V E S WE L LBO RN RDWE L L BO RN RDWE L L BO RN RD FM 2818FM 2818FM 2818FM 2154FM 2154FM 2154WILLIAM D. FITCH PKWYWILLIAM D. FITCH PKWYWILLIAM D. FITCH PKWY SH 4 7 SH 4 7 SH 4 7 RAYMOND ST OTZER PKRAYMOND ST OTZER PKRAYMOND ST OTZER PK WY ROCKROCKROCK PRAIRIEPRAIRIEPRAIRIE RDRDRD S H 6 S S H 6 S S H 6 SSH 6 SSH 6 SSH 6 SHARVEY RDHARVEY RDHARVEY RDKEY IMAGE / DESIGN INTERSECTION G1 PRI MARY ARRIVAL GATEWAY G2 SECONDARY WELCOMING GATEWAY G3 EARLY IMAGE-SE TTING GATEWAY PUBLIC ART LOCATION PRI MARY IMAGE CORRIDOR SECONDARY IMAGE CORRIDOR Community Assets & Image Corridors CITY LIMITS 5 MILE EXTRAT ERRITORIAL JURISDICTION (E TJ ) EXISTING UNIQUE COMMUNITY ASSET AREA EMERGING / POTENTIAL UNIQUE COMMUNIT Y ASSET AREA FLOODPLAIN Page 142 of 310 49CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Strategic & Ongoing Actions The actions listed below designed to achieve the City’s goal of vibrant and distinct districts, attractive neighborhoods, revitalized gateways and corridors, and conserved natural areas, grounded in environmental stewardship and resiliency. STRATEGIC ACTIONS 2.1 Review and undertake amendments to the Unified Development Ordinance’s zoning districts. Consider amendments necessary to implement the Future Land Use & Character categories and definitions. 2.2 Prioritize and undertake detailed plans for priority neighborhoods, districts, corridors, or redevelopment areas. The City should commit to proactively planning for a limited set of target areas, as specified in Map 2.1, Planning Areas. 2.3 Creative incentives and programs to revitalize existing areas and established neighborhoods. This could include façade or landscaping improvement programs or rehabilitation initiatives. New programs should align with and complement existing City efforts through the Neighborhood Partnership Program, Neighborhood Grant Program, and proposed property maintenance programming. 2.4 Evaluate existing policies and create incentives for low impact and sustainable development. Encourage policies and regulations that incentivize sustainable practices such as energy reduction, renewable energy, water conservation, protection of natural resources, use of native and adapted vegetation, adaptive reuse, waste minimization, and stormwater management. 2.5 Pursue feasibility of a tree preservation and/or tree planting incentive program. This could involve regulatory changes, incentives to preserve existing trees (especially large canopy trees) in new development and redevelopment projects, requiring replacement of trees that are destroyed or removed, proactive efforts by the City such as planting trees and installing landscaping along major road corridors and gateways, or a program where the City or a partner agency provides trees at reduced cost. 2.6 Create additional incentives for conservation design and evaluate the effectiveness of cluster development standards in the Unified Development Ordinance. Common incentives include density bonuses where a project may be permitted a greater total density in exchange for preservation of common open space areas. 2.7 Integrate parks, greenways, and community facilities within new neighborhoods. Ensure that parks, greenways, and other types of open spaces are integrated into the design of new neighborhoods and that appropriate connections are made to existing facilities. Also consider opportunities and partnerships to locate civic uses (such as recreation centers, schools, libraries) within new neighborhoods or redevelopment areas. Page 143 of 310 50CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN ONGOING ACTIONS AND POLICY DIRECTION 2.8 Evaluate and update development standards in the Unified Development Ordinance. Evaluate the effectiveness of development standards such as mobility and connectivity, off-street parking, building form and design, landscaping and buffers, exterior lighting, or other applicable standards to achieve desired design form and quality. 2.9 Develop or refine incentives to promote high quality design. Such incentives may include regulatory (flexible standards, density bonuses), procedural, cost-sharing agreements, and tax incentives, among others. Incentives could be targeted to specific geographies or types of development (such as mixed-use or commercial). 2.10 Encourage parking alternatives to support redevelopment opportunities. Use regulatory or other incentives to encourage residential, commercial, and mixed development models in the City’s targeted Redevelopment Areas that integrate structured parking, reduced parking requirements, or shared parking agreements to enable more productive use of the overall site in place of extensive surface parking. 2.11 Continue to initiate proactive zoning map updates. Amend the zoning map in strategic areas to encourage transitions to the desired community character and help implement the Future Land Use & Character Map. Proactive zoning map changes may also encourage redevelopment in targeted areas. 2.12 Continue beautification programs. Maintain and consider opportunities to expand beautification partnerships with Keep Brazos Beautiful and other organizations. Page 144 of 310 As the basic building blocks of a city, neighborhoods are places to live, grow, and develop thriving communities. Strong neighborhoods are not just collections of dwelling places; they are also defined by community institutions like schools, parks, and places of worship, along with local streets and in some contexts, neighborhood businesses. In many ways, a community is only as strong and sustainable as its neighborhoods. These foundational building blocks contribute to a unique sense of place and community identity, with residents contributing to partnerships, leadership, and civic involvement. An array of vibrant and desirable neighborhoods will help sustain a City that empowers all residents to belong and thrive. STRONG NEIGHBORHOODS3 OCTOBER 14, 2021 Page 145 of 310 52CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Goal Viable and attractive neighborhoods that maintain long-term neighborhood integrity while collectively providing a wide range of housing options and other services for a diverse population. Purpose The purpose of this chapter is to provide the strategies and actions that encourage attractive, livable neighborhoods that meet the City’s housing needs. Issues such as housing affordability, compatibility with adjacent land uses, property maintenance, neighborhood traffic, rental housing, and historic preservation impact the quality and stability of neighborhoods. The intent is the continued viability and long-term protection of College Station’s residential neighborhoods. This chapter discusses existing conditions within neighborhoods and outlines major planning considerations and policy guidance. This is followed by strategic action items for implementation. Overview The desire for strong neighborhoods that meet housing demand while maintaining affordable options and contributing to quality of life has been in the forefront of community debate since College Station’s founding. The need to provide infrastructure to off-campus neighborhoods served as one of the primary reasons for the incorporation of College Station in 1938. More than eighty years later, the City continues to balance its role as the home of Texas A&M University, one of the largest public universities in the nation, with the need to provide excellent services to all residents who make College Station their home. With on-campus housing available for only 11,366 of its 71,109 students1, the majority of students live off-campus in apartments and other rental properties including multi-family, condominium, townhome, and single-family residences. This integration of the student population with the permanent population creates a unique community where school spirit is apparent in almost all 1TAMU Department of Residence Life and TAMU Accountability Page 146 of 310 53CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN facets of daily life. On occasion, lifestyle differences between student households and long-term resident households can cause tension in neighborhoods. Issues related to noise, property maintenance, and parking are increasingly prevalent as market influences make purchasing homes for conversion to rental or investment property more attractive. The City encourages compatible infill and redevelopment opportunities that increase housing availability near the campus core while preserving the identity and character of existing neighborhoods. As residential construction continues, College Station must consider the long-term viability of its newest neighborhoods and how they fit into the community fabric. Neighborhoods should capitalize on what sets them apart from other neighborhoods, while creating a seamless transition between different housing types and adjacent land uses. Building community and neighborhood integrity includes building strong neighborhood organizations. Promoting homeowner and neighborhood associations is an important aspect of developing neighborhood integrity. These associations provide opportunities for localized decision making and community ownership that contribute to sustaining the attractiveness and marketability of neighborhoods. Existing Conditions Early College Station neighborhoods developed around parks and schools, in proximity to major university entrances, and were bordered by commercial land uses on major thoroughfares. The formation of the area’s early neighborhoods and housing also reflected the racial segregation patterns of the time. Specifically, the McCulloch Subdivision and Prairie View Heights are two historically African American neighborhoods. It is important to recognize these socio-spatial trends as they have had significant impacts on people, the community, and neighborhood development trajectories over time. Outside the City’s core, the majority of College Station’s neighborhoods developed after 1970, due in large part to Texas A&M University opening admission to women and minorities in the late 1960s. These newer developments tend to be large, multi-phased subdivisions that take access from the City’s thoroughfare system, with limited connectivity between subdivisions. These neighborhoods are primarily single-family detached housing developments. There is very little neighborhood-oriented commercial activity within walking distance and those proposed uses adjacent to established residential neighborhoods have been protested on many occasions by the residents. According to the 2019 American Community Survey2, the City has 46,353 total housing units. Single-family detached and multi-family units account for 87.1% of the housing stock (43.9% and 42.3% respectively). The remaining 12.9% is distributed amongst single-family attached (6.5%), duplex (6.1%), mobile home (1%), and boat, RV, and van (0.1%). Furthermore, 25,151 (62.3%) of housing units within the City are renter-occupied and 15,206 (37.7%) are owner-occupied. 2U.S. Census Bureau, 2019 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimate Page 147 of 310 54CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Housing costs in College Station are essentially identical to the national average. The median value for a house in College Station is $241,600 whereas the median nationally is $240,500.3 HOUSING CONDITIONS The City maintains robust data on housing conditions, having collected and compiled these data every five years since 1995. A set of definitions has been developed (see Figure 3.1 Housing Condition Definitions), categorizing the condition of housing units as excellent, conservable, substandard, or dilapidated. As seen in Figure 3.2 Condition of Housing Units, the percentage of housing units in excellent condition increased between 2010 and 2015, reflecting a surge in new construction and renovations. Units in excellent condition then decreased by 5.6 percentage points from 2015 to 2020, corresponding to about a 4.5 percentage point increase in conservable units, a 1.1 percentage point increase in substandard units, and a 0.1 percentage point increase in dilapidated units. It should be mentioned that the 2010 percentages applied to only single-family and duplex units while the 2015 and 2020 percentages also incorporated multi-family units. The housing conditions trends highlight the need for a continued and enhanced focus on property maintenance programs and upkeep. The data suggest that this need is likely especially relevant for multi-family properties. Additionally, care should be taken to promote quality housing conditions in low - and moderate - income neighborhoods. While recent housing conditions data do not differentiate between neighborhood income categories, a 2005 survey by Texas A&M students revealed that 81% of substandard and dilapidated units were found in low - and moderate-income neighborhoods, which comprised only 17% of the City’s homes at that time. Figure 3.1 - Housing Condition Definitions (from the Consolidated Plan) Excellent: These houses were well maintained and did not obviously require any repairs. Conservable: Houses that are currently maintained and in generally good repair. Any required work is minor and can be accomplished in one weekend. Improvements include painting and repair of screens. Substandard: Houses that require significant repair. A substandard unit is one that needs additional repairs that are more than required in normal maintenance such as a damaged wall, plumbing problems, broken windows and overall general repairs Dilapidated: Houses that do not provide safe or adequate shelter and endanger the health, safety, and wellbeing of the occupants. Repair costs could exceed 50% of the value of the house. Such units have one or more critical defects or a combination of a number of deficiencies to the extent as to require considerable repair or comprise inadequate construction. Defects, in addition to those listed above for substandard units, include: holes; open cracks; loose, rotten, or missing materials over large areas of the foundation, walls, or roof; sagging roof ridges, eaves, or out of plumb walls; extensive damage caused by fire, storm, flooding, termites, etc. Figure 3.2 - Condition of Housing Units 2010*2015 2020 Excellent 65.9%77.0%71.4% Conservable 31.6%22.6%27.07% Substandard 2.5%0.3%1.37% Dilapidated 0.1%0.1%0.19% *Includes only single-family and duplex units 3U.S. Census Bureau, 2019 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimate Page 148 of 310 55CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AGE OF HOUSING STOCK Housing quality can often be tied to the age of the housing stock. As can be expected of an 80-year-old city, the housing stock is also relatively young; only 24% of the housing stock is more than 40 years old compared to 29.1% in Brazos County and 38.9% in Texas.4 The majority of homes in College Station were built after 1990. In light of this, the housing stock in College Station is in moderate to good condition. Areas in close proximity to the university with large concentrations of rental properties are facing more rapid deterioration than other areas of town. As housing begins to age in College Station, the City could see a greater rate of demolition and redevelopment in its core. Policies and practices that encourage harmonious redevelopment and infill opportunities will become increasingly important to maintain the character of existing neighborhoods while meeting housing demand. RENTAL MARKET Over the years the local housing market has seen increased demand for new housing and a significant conversion of existing single-family homes to rental housing. From 2010 to 2020, the percentage of renter-occupied units has fallen slightly from 65.2%5 to 62.3%6, while still maintaining a majority of the market. Rental properties near the university are often priced using a rent-by-the-bedroom model, resulting in rental costs that are inflated compared to the remainder of the City. This can have negative ramifications for families and young professionals seeking rental housing near the university who find themselves priced out of the market. Increased rental costs along with increased demand have also driven up property values around the university. Neighborhoods near the university are seeing a rapid transition from older owner-occupied units to newly constructed units tailored primarily to student renters. Older homes may be converted into larger structures either by adding bedrooms or subdividing large lots, enabling the demolition of older homes and construction of multiple units on properties that previously held one structure. These newly constructed units often have a similar look and are characteristically large, two-story homes with four or more bedrooms that each have their own attached bathroom. This style is often referred to as a “stealth dorm” and is marketed almost exclusively to student renters. The proliferation of stealth dorm development changes the existing character of older traditionally single-family neighborhoods. The increased demand for density near the campus core must be balanced with measures aimed at protecting the character of existing neighborhoods. 4U.S. Census Bureau, 2019 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimate 5U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimate 6U.S. Census Bureau, 2019 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimate Page 149 of 310 56CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AFFORDABLE HOUSING Since 1990, the City of College Station has more than doubled its population, thus increasing demand on the available housing stock and necessitating rapid construction of new neighborhoods. These factors have affected the median house price in the City (See Figure 3.3 for Population Growth). The City’s population growth is closely tied with the growth of Texas A&M University as it adds approximately one thousand new students annually. As a result of the high demand for student accommodations near the university, housing prices have continued to rise over the last decade (See Figure 3.4 for Median Housing Prices). As house prices grow, citizens who are unable to keep up with the rapid increase in rental prices, house prices, or property 300,000 250,000 200,000 150,000 100,000 158,000 163,950 168,000 181,250 204,900 224,000 237,000 238,250 240,000 248,000 50,000 0 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Figure 3.4 - Median House Value Change 2011-20208 140,000 120,000 100,000 80,000 60,000 52,456 58,892 67,890 81,930 93,857 106,465 123,306 40,000 20,000 0 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 Figure 3.3 - College Station Population Growth 1990-20207 * The 2020 population projection is through April 1, 2020. Census 2020 results were not available at the time of the 10-Year update to this Comprehensive Plan 7Data provided by City of College Station Planning & Development Services 8 Data provided by Bryan-College Station Association of Realtors Page 150 of 310 57CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN taxes may be forced away from the City core to less expensive areas. This is known as gentrification and is discussed in depth in following sections. There are many negative impacts of gentrification including displacing original occupants, changing the character of neighborhoods, intensifying displaced persons’ reliance up on private vehicles and exacerbating their transportation costs due to increased distances and also increasing congestion. Programs and policies aimed at providing affordable and workforce housing, along with encouraging a mix of housing types for all demographics and lifestyles, will be essential to maintain viable and strong neighborhoods that serve all College Station citizens. CODE ENFORCEMENT AND NOISE VIOLATIONS The City maintains an active Code Enforcement program that enforces ordinances, investigates violations, and addresses nuisance issues such as junked vehicles, trash, tall grass, and property maintenance. Since 2009, nearly 105,000 enforcement actions have been processed across the City. The Code Enforcement team proactively educates citizens on code requirements and takes an education-first approach to enforcement actions. The City’s Police Department is tasked with enforcing noise ordinances, averaging 1,800 noise complaint calls made to the Police Department each year. Noise complaints peak every fall during football season then level off through the spring semester. While a majority of calls occur around the core of the City, noise concerns can be found throughout College Station. Planning Considerations Through public input and conversations with citizens, the City has identified several issues facing the community in promoting attractive and livable neighborhoods. At the forefront is the community relationship with Texas A&M University and the rental market centered around student housing. Affordable housing options, infill and adjacent land uses, neighborhood traffic management, parks and greenways, and neighborhood planning were also considered important. 201120102009 15,000 0 5,000 7,500 12,500 10,000 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 11,957 11,554 7,951 9 ,622 7 ,136 8 ,331 6 ,217 5,748 12,169 11,125 7,222 5,900 Figure 3.5 - Code Enforcement Actions 2009-20209 9 Data provided by City of College Station Code Enforcement Page 151 of 310 58CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN EXISTING REGULATIONS The City has a variety of existing regulations aimed at preserving neighborhood integrity. Some examples include single-family height protections, buffering and landscaping requirements for commercial and multi-family properties, neighborhood-compatible commercial design standards, residential driveway and parking design standards, lighting standards, impervious coverage maximums and stormwater management requirements, traffic mitigation strategies for larger multi-family and commercial projects, and parkland dedication requirements to foster the development of parks within neighborhoods. Additionally, various single-family overlay zoning districts have been created to help mitigate the issues associated with tear-downs in established neighborhoods. These include the Neighborhood Conservation Overlay, the Restricted Occupancy Overlay, and the Historic Preservation Overlay. The City has adopted the Family of International Codes, as amended and updated, which includes the International Building Code, a Property Maintenance Code, a Residential Code, and an Energy Conservation Code amongst others. These ordinances cover the minimum maintenance standards expected in the City and set out the standards for new construction for residential homes. In 2009, the City began requiring the registration of single-family and duplex rental properties. The purpose of the registration is to provide the City with a local point of contact for rental residences in case of an emergency where properties, tenants, or nearby neighborhoods could be impacted. Furthermore, the Rental Registration Program serves as a means of contact for the City in case property owners need to be contacted regarding ordinances, laws, or issues that could potentially affect their properties. The City also adopted regulations detailing host responsibilities for parties held in residential areas holding both the property owner and any other residents of the property responsible for noise, sanitation, and parking violations. THE TOWN/GOWN RELATIONSHIP As the cornerstone of the community, Texas A&M University significantly contributes to community identity. With capacity for approximately one-sixth10 of the 65,684 students11 living in on-campus housing, demand for student-oriented housing will continue to be a significant factor within the City. While many reside in apartment complexes, students also live throughout the community and in almost every neighborhood and housing type. Students contribute positively to College Station’s character and quality of life in many ways. As a college town, the rapid growth of Texas A&M University is both a benefit and a challenge that places strain on existing neighborhoods near the campus. Finding the appropriate balance between student-oriented housing and established neighborhoods is key. It is vital that the City and Texas A&M University collaborate to proactively address issues caused by the rapid growth of the university and potential for change within neighborhoods. Actions such as community discussions and educational campaigns serve to raise awareness about ordinances, promote healthy relationships between all community members, 10Data provided by TAMU Department of Residential life 11Data provided by TAMU Student Demographics Accountability Dashboard Page 152 of 310 59CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN and emphasize the values of a being “good neighbor.” With the 10-Year update to this Comprehensive Plan a new chapter, Chapter 9 Partnerships, was created to emphasize the importance of the City’s collaboration with partners, and particularly the relationship with Texas A&M University. Conversations between the university, City, and citizens have sparked several policy debates over the years. Some notable outcomes of these debates include the Strong and Sustainable Neighborhoods Initiative in the winter of 2007-08, the Neighborhood Conservation Overlay district creation and updates in 2019-20, and most recently the adoption of a Restricted Occupancy Overlay in 2021. Neighborhoods, developers, investors, students, university administrators, and College Station staff have identified a number of issues related to the influx of renters into traditionally single-family neighborhoods: • Communication. Effective communication is one of the central challenges in maintaining productive relationships between neighbors and between the City and local neighborhoods. While some neighborhoods have open communication with all, others have commented on problems engaging their renter population. The student rental market also poses significant challenges in building and sustaining neighborhood associations. Most renters within College Station are students – a transient population. It becomes difficult to implement long-term solutions and lasting organizations that serve a population that transitions every four to six years. Educational efforts must also be continuous as students cycle through Texas A&M University. • Property Maintenance. Residents have expressed concerns about the perceived lack of maintenance of rental properties. This includes everything from routine repairs to maintaining landscaping. While there has not been an established correlation between the maintenance of rental properties and owner-occupied properties, property maintenance will continue to be a concern for all older neighborhoods as the housing stock ages. As the City has adopted the Family of International Codes and adopts updates as the code is amended, enforcement actions are taken when properties are identified as out of compliance with the maintenance standards within the Property Maintenance Code. • Noise and Parking. The most often discussed challenges center around behavioral factors, including parking issues and noise that can be generated by parties and other social gatherings. While current ordinances restrict noise that can be heard beyond common property lines after 10 p.m., there is a perceived lack of enforcement by residents who make complaints. The College Station Police Department fielded 2,184 loud party calls in 202012, with the majority during the fall semester. Additionally, parties can be accompanied by cars parked on lawns and blocking driveways, which limits access by emergency vehicles as well as availability of resident parking. • Sprawl. Previous efforts by the City have tried to focus dense rental development catering to students in close proximity to the university. However, since most of these areas are built out, greenfield development, including multi-family and rental subdivisions, have moved further south, away from campus. As existing properties near the university age, the opportunity for redevelopment of student-oriented housing near the university increases. This will need to occur in appropriate areas and in a manner that is sensitive to the character of existing neighborhoods. These issues are most apparent in areas close to the university, but examples are present across the entire City. Established neighborhoods often view the conversion to rental or investment homes as a threat to the integrity and identity of neighborhoods. However, this is a complex issue that calls for a balanced approach and working together creatively so that everyone can experience a sense of belonging in the community. 12Data provided by City of College Station Police Department Page 153 of 310 60CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT During the public input process, citizens also expressed concern regarding cut-through traffic within neighborhoods, on-street parking, and access to adequate bicycle facilities and pedestrian paths. One of the biggest concerns is the location and role major thoroughfares have on neighborhoods. In older neighborhoods, thoroughfares are generally integrated in the street network. In more recent developments, thoroughfares are placed on subdivision edges, thus contributing to the canyon-like effect fences have on roadways. The increased use of cul-de-sacs and loop streets as well as the lack of sidewalk connection to commercial areas or to a larger sidewalk network discourage connectivity, which causes difficulties when distributing traffic volumes and providing alternative paths to major points of interest throughout the City. As a response, the Thoroughfare Plan and the City’s Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan have been updated to provide context-sensitive street design and a more extensive and improved bike, pedway, and micromobility network (see Chapter 6: Integrated Mobility). NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS AND GREENWAYS Neighborhood parks often serve as the center of interaction between neighbors. Parks and recreation services are vital to maintain community identity and increase quality of life. Providing active and passive recreational spaces, hiking, and educational spaces, College Station’s nationally accredited and award-winning parks system is a vital centerpiece of the community. Moreover, public and private landscaping contributes to the attractiveness of neighborhoods, which is reflected in the City’s efforts to requiring streetscaping on all City- constructed thoroughfares. In addition to parks, the City offers greenways which provide much of the natural open space in and around the community. Directly related to flood control, greenways also provide for natural buffers between adjacent land uses and as means of connection between parks and the community. In regard to the opposition to developing in the floodplain around existing residential development, the Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan aims to promote ways to encourage connectivity of greenways and methods for the conservation and acquisition of those properties (see Chapter 5: Desirable Amenities & Recreation). Brison Park was developed as an integral component of the College Park subdivision in the 1920s. This commitment to the preservation and provision of open space and parks is still alive in College Station today. Greenways are linear open space corridors that follow natural features such as creeks and rivers and their floodplains or man-made features such as utility, road or rail corridors. Greenways are a resource that serve a variety of functions including but not limited to floodplain management, protection of open space and wildlife and plant habitats. Trails within a greenway can provide alternate transportation, recreation and health benefits. Greenway trails also create connections to parks, neighborhoods, workplaces, schools, cultural and historical areas and shopping centers. Page 154 of 310 61CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING The City of College Station coordinates services for neighborhoods through its Neighborhood Services Department and neighborhood planning efforts through the Planning and Development Services Department. Neighborhood Services focuses on maintaining collaborative partnerships between neighborhoods, community services, and the City. Programs such as the Neighborhood Partnership Program and Neighborhood Grant Program where the City provides financial support for projects within neighborhoods are some of the ways the City actively engages with its neighborhoods. Neighborhood Services also undertakes educational and outreach programming. Neighborhood Services focuses on promoting the development of neighborhood and homeowner associations and currently assists 85 registered associations. The Planning and Development Services Department provides services such as land use and comprehensive planning, building regulations and inspections, and floodplain management to maintain orderly, prosperous, and efficient growth for the City. The department undertakes specialty planning efforts for smaller areas and neighborhoods and works collaboratively with residents to identify projects and programs within those small areas that contribute positively to neighborhood integrity, character, and quality of life. Neighborhood-focused services should continue tracking community identity and character indicators to help identify neighborhoods in transition so that the City can allocate resources to specific areas of need. Most importantly, the City should continually enhance its public engagement efforts through additional public education and outreach. Many of the issues that typically arise in the development process that frustrate neighborhoods happen because of a lack of communication and a lack of knowledge about the process. A comprehensive education and outreach program should be developed that provides opportunities to learn about neighborhood planning and the overall development process. The City should also look for ways to improve communication with neighborhood residents about proposed projects. New Neighborhoods New development plays a key role in the changing character of the City. New residential neighborhoods have an impact on traffic patterns, property values, and quality of life. A number of College Station’s most recently developed neighborhoods have been developed in southern College Station, placing additional stressors on the transportation network as residents commute throughout the City. New residential subdivisions should be designed to fit within the existing fabric of the community and complement the natural environment. Sustainable neighborhoods should be developed with integrated parks Page 155 of 310 62CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN that are easily and safely reached on foot or bicycle and have identifiable borders and entries. Development policies should encourage the clustering of homes to reduce environmental impacts on sensitive areas like floodplains and provide for common areas of recreation and play that are easily accessible to residents. Context sensitive designs for thoroughfares should encourage buildings to face onto streets where practical and provide quality multi-modal transportation options to and through the neighborhood. Additionally, connectivity in and around neighborhoods should be encouraged to help disperse traffic rather than funnel it onto one or two major roads. Historic Preservation The history and heritage of College Station is an important component of defining the City’s identity and sense of place. The original neighborhoods of College Station have faced continual change since they were first developed primarily for professors, university staff, and supporting workers. In 1986, the City created the first Historic Preservation Committee. The committee works on various historic preservation initiatives and hosts monthly educational luncheons that explore College Station’s history. The City recognizes historic homes and buildings through its local Historic Marker Program, which recognizes property owners and provides educational benefits to the public. However, the historical marker status does not offer property protections or additional regulations. The City also created a Historic Preservation Overlay zoning district that is intended to provide for the protection and preservation of places and areas of historical, cultural, and architectural important and significance. Additionally, Project HOLD – or Historic Online Library Database – allows citizens to learn about the history and heritage of the City of College Station. To date, the City does not have a comprehensive historic preservation plan. Such a planning effort could prioritize the City’s preservation efforts, research the community’s historic areas and properties, research and recognize how demography (particularly race and socioeconomic status) have impacted College Station’s development, identify new areas to survey, and identify assistance and incentives for preservation or revitalization efforts. Infill and Adjacent Land Uses Infill development offers the opportunity to mediate and enhance the identity of neighborhoods. These uses can be accessible to the neighborhood and developed to provide a seamless transition from residential to nonresidential uses. Small-scale office or neighborhood retail uses are appropriate directly adjacent Page 156 of 310 63CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN to neighborhoods if they are an integrated component of the neighborhood with adequate buffering and transition for noise, light, and parking intrusions where necessary. Mixed-residential and multi-family uses should also be designed as a component of the neighborhood instead of as islands of development with no relationship to adjacent single-family neighborhoods. Adjacent land uses have an impact on neighborhood character and identity. Non-residential and multi- family properties can develop out of character and scale with adjacent single-family residences if not designed appropriately. Lighting, noise, and traffic are some of the issues that arise, as well as potential aesthetic issues of non-residential buildings adjacent to single-family homes. Buffering, architectural, lighting standards, and height protections are currently in place for nonresidential uses in the City. Neighborhoods also face intrusion from out-of-character single-family infill development. As College Station attracts more retirees and alumni back to the community and as property values increase, areas close to the university continue to feel pressures for redevelopment. Already, older homes in the Southside neighborhood are being torn down in favor of larger homes – some serving as sporting event weekend homes for alumni – changing the character and identity of that neighborhood. Moreover, neighborhoods near Texas A&M University are facing a rapid transition from owner-occupied units to renter-occupied units due to the university’s significant increase in student enrollment. Stealth dorms are common in these neighborhoods where older properties are being converted into multi-bedroom units aimed at university students, thus altering the existing character of the neighborhood. Affordable Housing As the City of College Station has nearly doubled its population in the last 20 years, mostly due to the rapid expansion of Texas A&M University, the need to offer affordable housing incentives is crucial to maintain steady and prosperous growth. The City has efforts focused on providing established and incoming residents with the tools to successfully combat the rising median home price. With an increase in tear-downs, gentrification is occurring at faster rates than in previous decades. The City should evaluate the impact of single- lot redevelopment on existing residents – taking care to prevent and mitigate the displacement of permanent residents priced out of their neighborhoods as property values increase. This has become increasingly relevant in the core neighborhoods closest to the university as older housing stock Gentrification is a process of redevelopment that results in the displacement of the original residents of a neighborhood due to increased property values. Gentrification occurs when homes and land are redeveloped in an existing neighborhood and cause a subsequent rise in adjacent property values that existing residents may not have the income to pay. Socio-economic shifts can result in changes in the original neighborhood’s culture and character. Page 157 of 310 64CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN becomes the focus of rehabilitation and infill efforts. The City recognizes the importance of preserving the original character of neighborhoods of all backgrounds from gentrification threats such as inflated home prices and displacement of original occupants. As a response, the City will continue to improve on its efforts, programs, and incentives that provide better and increased affordable housing options, as well as further support to low - and moderate - income citizens with homeownership and rental assistance. Actions such as developmental standards used to reduce barriers for affordable housing types, pre-approved building plans, new incentives, density bonuses in appropriate areas, reduced parking requirements are strategies the City may use to mitigate increasing housing prices. These are issues of equitable, fair, and affordable housing, and the City is committed to ensuring options for safe, dignified, and financially attainable shelter for everyone in College Station. The City offers the Leveraged Housing Development Program, which assists low - to middle - income residents with job opportunities, economic development, and affordable housing opportunities. Other programs include the Down Payment Program, Housing Minor Repair Program, Housing Rehabilitation Loan Program, Housing Reconstruction Loan Program, and Tenant-Based Rental Assistance Program. Moreover, the City works in partnership with organizations focused on providing affordable housing, such as the Brazos Valley Community Action Programs, Elder-Aid, Inc., and Habitat for Humanity. CONTEXTUAL NEIGHBORHOOD COMPATIBILITY STANDARDS – EXAMPLES FOR ACTION 3.1 Like many cities, College Station’s Unified Development Ordinance contains standards that are intended to address the compatibility of development and redevelopment to maintain the integrity of neighborhoods, including some of the items included below. Types of compatibility standards include: Standards within neighborhoods. Consider contextual compatibility standards for some single-family residential zoning districts. These standards could include a rule that requires the lot area, setback, and height standards in the district be between a certain percent of the average setbacks, lot area, and height of the lots and development on the same block face, or within a certain distance of the site. Other types of standards could address student housing conversions by limiting on-site parking, or the location and size of accessory dwelling units, or limiting the size and scale of homes. Transitional areas. Consider standards that apply to new nonresidential development, mixed-use development, and intense, multi-family development above a certain density that is adjacent to, across the street from, or within a certain distance from attached and detached residences. Such standards include building frontage, building height, signage, buffering, lighting, parking, loading and access areas, among others. From the City of College Station’s 10-Year Comprehensive Plan Evaluation & Appraisal Report Page 158 of 310 65CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Strategic & Ongoing Actions College Station residents have been clear in their desire to promote strong and sustainable neighborhoods. The actions listed below are aimed at implementing the goal of viable and attractive neighborhoods that maintain long-term neighborhood integrity while collectively providing a wide range of housing options for a diverse population. The actions include new strategic items as well as ongoing efforts undertaken by the City. STRATEGIC ACTIONS 3.1 Evaluate the effectiveness and refine neighborhood compatibility standards in the UDO. Standards in the UDO should address compatibility of infill and redevelopment within established neighborhoods and appropriate transitions between land uses, particularly between neighborhoods and more intense commercial or mixed-use development adjacent to a neighborhood. 3.2 Create a neighborhood planning toolkit. Build upon Neighborhood Services efforts and establish a process for neighborhood organizations to undertake a City-supported project in their area, or to create City-supported projects and policies for their area. 3.3 Create and promote a housing maintenance educational program. Create an education/ promotional campaign to raise awareness of existing resources to maintain and enhance the existing housing stock including City grants and federal programs. Develop an educational program to assist residents in learning basic home maintenance and repair skills. 3.4 Expand affordable housing and workforce housing. Continue to support efforts, programs, and incentives aimed at developing affordable housing stock and assisting low - and moderate - income citizens to secure affordable homeownership and/or rental opportunities. Potential actions may include regulatory provisions such as: • Development standards that reduce barriers for affordable and diverse housing types. • Pre-approved building plans or pattern books for target locations. • Incentives such as density bonuses or more flexible standards, or • A workforce housing capital pool where a public entity establishes a fund that is used for various types of affordable housing initiatives 3.5 Develop a parking strategy for neighborhoods near the university. Coordinate with Texas A&M University regarding university-related parking to prevent excessive on-street parking in areas adjacent to the university. Evaluate the feasibility of a program to address management of parking in adjacent neighborhoods. 3.6 Develop and refine data monitoring processes to analyze housing trends and define a strategic set of actions to address housing affordability, diversity, and gentrification. Consider existing market data, best practices, and existing regulations and incentives. Page 159 of 310 66CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 3.7 Continue to track neighborhood change. Continue maintaining an inventory of community development trends and housing conditions by block or neighborhood in areas with a high propensity for change to identify potential areas at risk of decline and to combat displacement of existing residents. Existing data on demolitions, building permits, or occupancy could also be compiled and reviewed on a regular basis. 3.8 Evaluate relevancy of neighborhood and small area plans that are beyond their planning horizon. Develop a process to either retire or update plans. ONGOING ACTIONS AND POLICY DIRECTION 3.9 Continue partnering with local nonprofit organizations and area partners to support affordable housing options. Continue partnerships with organizations such as the Brazos County Home Repair Coalition, Bryan/College Station Habitat for Humanity, Brazos Valley Community Action Programs, Elder Aid, Brazos County Council of Governments, and housing tax credit developers. 3.10 Continue outreach and educational efforts to support existing and encourage new neighborhood organizations. Continue Neighborhood Services initiatives such as Seminar Suppers, Neighborhood Newsletters, and training programs. 3.11 Continue to fund the Neighborhood Grant Program. Continue to fund and expand the Neighborhood Grant Program for neighborhood activities such as gateways, landscaping, and other permit application fees. 3.12 Require neighborhood meetings for certain development applications. This provides a forum for applicants and neighbors to resolve conflicts in an informal setting before an application is submitted or prior to formal consideration of the item. 3.13 Maintain property maintenance enforcement efforts. Maintain enforcement resources to ensure that minimum property standards are being upheld. Utilize community development plans and current data to target and prioritize enforcement efforts, while being equitable to the needs of lower income or rental areas. 3.14 Evaluate the effectiveness of short-term rental regulations. Periodically evaluate short-term rental regulations with respect to local data, national trends, and emerging technology, to support neighborhood integrity. 3.15 Evaluate and refine the rental registration program. Periodically evaluate the rental registration program with respect to local data and trends to support neighborhood integrity. Page 160 of 310 The Economic Development Master Plan was created to further implement the goals and strategies of the City’s Comprehensive Plan. The master planning process offers the opportunity to focus on a single functional element – in this case, economic development – and develop detailed approaches to implementing the goals and objects contained in the Comprehensive Plan. A PROSPEROUS ECONOMY4 OCTOBER 14, 2021 Page 161 of 310 68CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Goal A diversified economy with a wide variety of competitive jobs and support for entrepreneurs that provides a tax base to support the City’s ability to foster a high quality of life where economic prosperity is widespread. Economic Development Master Plan As of the 2015 Comprehensive Plan Five-Year Evaluation & Appraisal report and plan update, Chapter 4 of the Comprehensive Plan was replaced by the Economic Development Master Plan, originally adopted by City Council in 2013 and updated in May 2020. The intent of the master plan is to ensure future growth and development advances the City’s economic development objectives. The plan establishes a strategic framework to attract high-end investment, support retail development and redevelopment opportunities, support and retain existing businesses, support expansion and relocation of corporate investment, destination, and hospitality activities, and to sustain and enhance community health, wellness, and a high quality of life. Specific actions are included to enhance and promote the Midtown Business Park, College Station Business Center, the Science Park/Providence Park, and the BioCorridor. The plan also focuses on enhancing awareness of College Station through improved marketing and recruitment efforts of major employers, retail and industry, and Aggie-owned and led businesses. Amplifying existing community assets such as the Wolf Pen Creek and Northgate districts and community events is also a priority. Please see the Economic Development Master Plan for full details. The current Economic Development Master Plan was approved during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic. The data and competitive positions discussed in the plan reflect pre- pandemic economic trends and projections. There is economic uncertainly as the pandemic unfolds and the City will monitor trends and modify economic development plans and responses accordingly. Furthermore, the plan was approved just before City Council made the decision to move tourism efforts in-house, integrating tourism with economic development effective August 1, 2020. This move has placed a greater emphasis on collaboration with strategic partners like Texas A&M University, enhanced branding and marketing of College Station and its sports and leisure assets, and newfound ways to generate sales tax dollars from tourism within College Station. With the 10-Year update to this Comprehensive Plan a new chapter, Chapter 9: Partnerships, was created to emphasize the importance of the City’s collaboration with partners, and particularly the relationship with Texas A&M University. Page 162 of 310 Parks, greenways, and the arts play an integral role in improving quality of life for the residents of College Station. They foster social, environmental, economic, and health benefits by uniting families, building cultural diversity, promoting stewardship of natural resources, attracting businesses, and offering places for a healthy lifestyle. Parks and greenways create a sense of place and frame neighborhoods into unique spaces to be enjoyed and explored. Performing and fine arts provide opportunities for entertainment, education, and culture. ENGAGING SPACES5 OCTOBER 14, 2021 Page 163 of 310 70CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Goal Highly desirable parks, greenways, arts and cultural amenities that support high-quality experiences for residents and visitors. Purpose When College Station residents were asked to rank enhancements that would make College Station a better place to live and work, more parks, greenways, and entertainment were among the top choices. Also ranking high were environmental protection, recreation facilities, addressing drainage and flooding concerns, and community image and appearance. Residents view parks, greenways, and the arts as necessities in College Station. These amenities improve the character and livability of a city and warrant a significant level of attention and commitment of resources. Planning and investing in these assets are expected and appreciated by current residents, business owners, and visitors. The purpose of this chapter is to recognize and ensure the continued protection and enhancement of leisure, recreation, and cultural opportunities available to the residents of College Station through parks, greenways, and the arts. College Station enjoys a diverse and educated citizenry who support and celebrate this vital component of local quality of life. The City recognizes the value of the natural environment and its effects upon the physical and mental health of its citizens. This chapter sets the framework for the City’s parks and recreation system and greenways program. The City has two topic-specific planning efforts that delve into greater detail regarding the actions and measures needed to maintain and grow the City’s parks and recreation system and greenways program. These are the Recreation, Park, and Open Space Master Plan, adopted in 2011 and undergoing a major update in 2021, and the Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan, adopted in 2010 and updated in 2018. The City of College Station offers its residents a wide variety of recreation and leisure experiences in locations across the community. The City of College Station offers its residents a wide variety of recreation and leisure experiences in locations across the community. Page 164 of 310 71CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Existing Conditions The City of College Station strives to be a leader and innovator in parks and recreation facilities, greenways preservation, events, programs and cultural amenities. The City’s parks and greenways span almost 2,000 acres, as viewed in Map 5.1, Parks and Greenways. City-owned greenway property has been transferred into the parks system in recent years to enhance its access and public awareness, increase its protection, and provide better connectivity between parks and greenways. While greenways can provide recreational and mobility purposes, this does not diminish the role that greenways play in floodplain and storm water management and conservation of the natural environment. The parks and recreation system includes a variety of athletic fields and courts, pavilions, biking and walking trails, exercise stations, playgrounds, dog parks, senior centers, and swimming pools. Other facilities include an amphitheater and festival site, a skate park, a full-service recreation center, two cemeteries, a nature center, and an inventory of flat athletic fields and diamonds that routinely host state and national tournaments for a variety of sports. Programs range from aquatics and swim lessons, athletic leagues for all ages, and afterschool care to entertainment with the Starlight Music Series and educational classes. NEEDS ASSESSMENT The City’s goal is to achieve seven acres of parkland per 1,000 citizens. A combination of standards-based and resource-based approaches are used to assess the need for additional parks, recreation facilities, and greenways within College Station. The potential need for additional parkland acreage to satisfy current and future demands is determined by applying the recommended standards to the current and future population of the City. In 2018, a comprehensive needs assessment was initiated by City staff, employing the firm of National Service Research. The purpose of the study was to provide guidance regarding park, recreation and open space to meet citizen needs and priorities. The key objectives selected were to identify frequency of park and recreation use, maintenance rating of parks and recreation facilities, recreation programs of interest, and park facility needs. These approaches provide a comprehensive analysis for future additions to the parks and recreation system as well as the greenway system. The Recreation, Park, and Open Space Master Plan and the Bicycle, Pedestrian and Greenways Master Plan further detail the land, facility, and program needs that surfaced through planning processes and outline the practices City staff will employ to achieve these objectives. Page 165 of 310 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 29 28 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 1 SUMMIT CROSSING 33 SOUTHWEST 2 CRESCENT POINTE 34 GEORGIE K. FITCH 3 VETERANS PA RK & AT HLETIC COMPLEX 35 LONGMIRE 4 UNIVERSITY 36 SANDSTONE 5 BILLIE MADELY 37 STEEPLECHASE 6 NORTHGATE 38 BARRACKS II 7 FIRST DOWN 39 BROTHERS POND 8 LIONS 40 WOODCREEK 9 EASTGATE 41 JACK & DOROTHY MILLER 10 THOMAS 42 BRIAN BACHMANN 11 PA RKWAY 43 EDELWEISS 12 RICHARD CARTER 44 MIDTOWN RESERVE 13 MERRY OAKS 45 EDELWEISS GARTENS 14 BRISON 46 CREEK VIEW 15 OAKS 47 HUNTINGTON TRAIL 16 WINDWOOD 48 M.D. WHEELER PH 2 17 SMITH TRACT 49 TEXAS INDEPENDENCE BALLPA RK 18 W.A. TA RROW 50 WOODLAND HILLS 19 LUTHER JONES 51 SONOMA 20 ANDERSON 52 REAT TA MEADOWS 21 WOLF PEN CREEK 53 SOUTHERN OAKS 22 ART & MYRA BRIGHT 54 BRIDGEWOOD 23 CARTER’S CROSSING 55 CASTLEROCK 24 JOHN CROMPTON 56 PHILLIPS 25 SOUTHLAND 57 WA LLACE LAKE 26 GABBARD 58 CASTLEGAT E 27 LEMONTREE 59 PEBBLE CREEK 28 BEE CREEK 60 LICK CREEK 29 CY MILLER 61 ETONBURY 30 STEPHEN C. BEACHY CENTRAL 62 GREENS PRAIRIE RESERVE 31 HEADLAKE 63 WILDWOOD 32 EMERALD FOREST 64 COVE OF NANTUCKET PARKS CEMETERIES GREENWAYS M AP 5.1 Parks & Greenways UNIVERSITY DRGEORGE BUSH DRTE X A S A V E SHARVEY RDHOLLEMAN DRSOUTH WEST PKWY FM 2818DEACONDRROCK PRAIRIE RD GRAHAM RDEAGLE AVEBARRON RDGREENS PRAIRIE RDWILLIAM D. FITCH PKWYF M 2 1 5 4 S H 6 S S H 6 S MI D T O W N D R Page 166 of 310 73CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Planning Considerations College Station’s residents identified various issues and opportunities facing the community regarding parks, greenways, and the arts. The planning considerations highlighted in this section helped shape the action recommendations that follow. Growth and changing demographic trends are important components in determining the development of parks, greenways, and the arts. College Station has a projected annual growth rate of 2.8% based on trends from 2010-2020 and is projected to increase to more than 162,500 residents by 2030.1 An increasing population creates demand for an increased and diverse offering of programs, facilities, and open space to maintain current levels of service. Although school and college-aged residents will continue to make up a large portion of the population, residents of retirement age are the fastest growing demographic. This may present a need for more passive recreation opportunities in the future in a system currently geared towards more active recreation. MAINTAINING A PREMIER PARKS AND RECREATION SYSTEM City staff have identified five pillars to approach the strategic and ongoing actions of the parks and recreation system in a goal-oriented, systematic fashion: Experience & Engagement: Create a positive and memorable experience for all customers. Strive to involve and request input from all park and program participants. Create public awareness of all programs, facilities, and greenspace. Capital, Operational & Maintenance Funding: Identify and establish desirable alternatives to fund all aspects of projects, operations, and maintenance. Natural Resource Management: Protection of the wildlife, plants, water, and soil of an area, with a particular focus on quality of life and stewardship. Growth & Sustainability: Employ and track the demographics and growth patterns of the City to maintain, secure, and develop desirable greenspace and facilities. Accessibility & Inclusion: Inclusive and accessible design, affordable pricing and implementation of programs, activities and facilities that takes into consideration the diversity of the population. The community must ensure College Station maintains and develops its parks and recreation system effectively to meet current and future needs. Considerations for the community include: (1) continued development of a balanced, convenient, and accessible park system, (2) quality park appearance and maintenance, and (3) coordination, collaboration, and adequate funding. Page 167 of 310 74CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Balanced, Convenient, and Accessible Park System A successful parks and recreation system creates a balance of public open spaces and recreation opportunities across the community. All residents should have an equal opportunity to access parks and the facilities they offer to meet recreational and leisure needs. A comprehensive parks and recreation system also offers a variety of parks, ranging in size and focus to satisfy diverse social and ecological needs. Greenways now fall under the umbrella of this system and provide linear connections with trails where appropriate. A variety of indoor and outdoor facilities and spaces, as well as an adequate assortment of activities and programs, should be provided to meet the individual and collective needs of all the residents of College Station. Quality Park Appearance and Maintenance The condition and appearance of parks is an indicator of their value to the community. Collectively, parks and public open spaces can contribute to the aesthetics, natural beauty, property values, and sustainability of the City. Facilities and programs such as the Fun for All Playground that focuses on providing interactive learning opportunities for all ability levels, the Lick Creek Nature Center educational programming, and the renovation and expansion of the Lincoln Recreation Center are just a few of the ways the City demonstrates its commitment to a well maintained, diverse parks system that positively contributes to citizens’ quality of life. Moreover, the Parks & Recreation Department hosts seasonal events to better serve the community and partners with the Economic Development & Tourism Department to promote sports tourism as both an experience and an economic driver for the community. Coordination, Collaboration, and Adequate Funding As the City continues to grow and develop, College Station will see an increased demand for parks and recreation facilities and programs. To meet this increasing demand, mechanisms that encourage joint acquisition, development, and funding of public spaces will help the City to stretch local resources for the development and redevelopment of its parks. City coordination and collaboration with agencies, such as Brazos County, the College Station Independent School District, the City of Bryan, Texas A&M University, developers, and other local agencies and organizations mutually benefit all interests because it eases the municipal tax burden related to parks and recreation demands and enhances the quality of parks and recreation facilities and programs. Collaboration requires effective communication and coordination among stakeholders. Through agreements reached between public/semi-public agencies, as well as partnerships with the private sector, the parks and recreation system can benefit in the quality and quantity of facilities and programs it offers. Joint acquisition, construction, operation, and maintenance allow more efficient use of public resources while Page 168 of 310 75CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN ensuring that the system is well-coordinated and connected. Effectively leveraging State and Federal grants and private foundation funds is also important to developing and sustaining a parks and recreation system for the long term. ENHANCING THE GREENWAYS PROGRAM The purpose of the Greenways Program is to establish a network of greenways or open space corridors throughout the community for conservation and to connect people and places through greenway trails for recreation and transportation. Considerations for the community include: (1) promoting the protection of land to maximize use and enjoyment and the natural resource stewardship through preservation, conservation and restoration, as well as (2) creating connections to key destinations with greenway trails. Since the adoption of the first Greenways Master Plan by City Council in 1999, now incorporated into the Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan, College Station has made progress toward establishing a network of greenway corridors across the community. As ongoing urbanization alters the City’s natural landscape and quality of life, it is important to continue developing the greenway system through acquisition and protection. Greenways serve to protect linear open spaces that follow natural areas (e.g., rivers and streams and their floodplains) and man-made features (e.g., utility, road,or rail corridors). They should remain in their natural state except for the introduction of greenway trails that connect people with places, where appropriate. Priority greenways to be protected in College Station currently include the following creeks: Alum, Bee, Carter, Lick, Spring, Wolf Pen, their tributaries and floodplains, as well as the Gulf States Utility Easement. Greenways provide functional, aesthetic, economic, and social benefits to the community. From a functional and aesthetic perspective, greenways provide for floodplain and stormwater management, water quality protection, as well as wildlife and aquatic habitat protection. From a social and economic perspective, greenways introduce trails in appropriate locations that provide alternative modes of transportation, recreation, increased real estate values to adjacent properties, and tourist revenue. Page 169 of 310 76CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Connection of Parks, Schools, and Neighborhoods Greenway trails connect people and places by providing an alternative mode of transportation for bicyclists and pedestrians. These linear corridors create safe and convenient opportunities for regional connectivity between neighborhoods, parks, schools, transit stops, and a variety of key destinations. The benefits of the parks and recreation system are also enhanced as they become more readily accessible to residents through a connected network. The City must balance the preservation of open space and the introduction of trails to minimize environmental impacts with the other functions of greenways including floodplain management, erosion control, stormwater management, and the protection of wildlife and plants. Crime prevention through environmental design and universal design should also be incorporated into the location and design of greenways trails to ensure safety and accessibility. Natural Resource Stewardship through Conservation, Preservation, and Restoration There are a variety of open spaces throughout College Station, the Extraterritorial Jurisdiction (ETJ), and the City’s public parks and greenways that encompass important natural resources worthy of environmental protection. Land along major rivers and streams such as the Brazos River, Carter Creek, and their floodplains, existing utility easements, drainage easements, and agricultural lands in the ETJ, offer opportunities for land stewardship through conservation, preservation, or restoration. As College Station continues to develop, protecting its valuable natural resources will be important in maintaining the aesthetic character and environmental quality of the community. Restoring and protecting natural areas provides the benefits of outdoor recreation opportunities and general enjoyment for the community. Rivers, streams, and their riparian buffers serve as amenities which prevent flood damage, protect wildlife and plant habitat, recharge groundwater resources, provide for stormwater management, and improve water quality. Better protection and use of natural areas in and around College Station may be achieved by adopting sound environmental conservation practices and responsible land development practices. These natural areas should be incorporated into developments as natural amenities to help sustain their function as an environmental resource. Doing so requires polices that balance development and natural resource protection. Page 170 of 310 77CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN ARTS, CULTURE, AND OTHER LEISURE ACTIVITIES As the home of Texas A&M University and a growing, vibrant community, College Station increasingly desires to promote a range of activities to enliven its residents’ leisure time. This includes unique and integrated opportunities for entertainment, education, and culture. Such amenities clearly boost a community’s livability and make it more attractive to current and potential new residents, retirees, and businesses. The City recognizes the need for leisure activities and provides an ample variety of opportunities ranging from soccer fields to aquatic recreation opportunities to youth educational programming. Furthermore, the City provides sports leagues and instructional classes to all ages and abilities. Finally, the network of parks throughout the City offers great views and endless opportunities to explore nature. The City’s Role in the Arts In taking a direct role as both a promoter and purveyor of leisure time pursuits, the City recognizes the range of interests and abilities that are found across the community. With limited funds and staffing, both within municipal government and among its various private and nonprofit partners, the City faces the challenge of being responsive to diverse wants and needs while attempting to focus on core offerings so that high quality facilities and/or services can be provided and maintained over time. The City also plays a role in more passive aspects, such as providing support for public art installations which make a statement about the community and enhance its image at gateway locations, along key corridors, and within parks and greenways. The City supports nonprofit organizations that seek to increase the quantity of and access to public art. A wide array of existing public art is available throughout the City, including sculptures, fiber art, theater and performing arts, and literature and poetry. More than 60 regional nonprofit arts, culture, and heritage affiliate organizations are represented by the Arts Council of the Brazos Valley. Page 171 of 310 78CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Strategic & Ongoing Actions Based on the considerations above and balancing input from the 2018 Needs Assessment, Council strategic initiatives, the Parks & Recreation Advisory Board, and the Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Advisory Board the actions below aim to implement the goal of highly desirable parks, greenways, and arts and cultural amenities that support high-quality experiences for residents and visitors. The actions include new, strategic items as well as ongoing efforts undertaken by the City. The Recreation, Park, and Open Space Master Plan and the Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan further detail the land, facility, and program needs of the parks and recreation and greenways systems. STRATEGIC ACTIONS 5.1 Continue to support, promote, and operate major arts, entertainment, sporting, and cultural destinations through cumulative attractions. Utilize digital platforms and coordinate with the Economic Development & Tourism Department to promote cultural and entertainment offerings. Promote the multi-purpose mission of the Wolf Pen Creek and Northgate Districts as live music destinations and areas to live, work, and play. 5.2 Maintain and expand community-based greenway and open space preservation programs. Through the Adopt-a-Greenway and parks volunteer programs, continue involving neighborhood and community groups in preservation and maintenance programs. 5.3 Continue to expand outreach about the parks and greenway system. Enhance awareness and accessibility to programs and facilities through the City’s website, publications, and media outlets. 5.4 Support a community-wide public art program. Contribute to the expansion of a public art program in conjunction with the Arts Council of Brazos Valley, the City of Bryan, Texas A&M University, and the Texas Department of Transportation. 5.5 Continue leisure, health, and educational programming. Continue the City’s role in offering leisure, health, and educational activities to citizens of all ages through the City’s Parks & Recreation department programming. 5.6 Identify and secure public and private funds for the acquisition of parks, greenways, and facilities. Ensure adequate parkland and greenway provisions through the Parkland Dedication Ordinance, the Capital Improvements Program, annual budgets, City property acquisition programs, external dollars, foundations, and public-private partnerships. Explore opportunities for connections between developments, conservation easements, or additional provisions that require dedication of open space. 5.7 Continue inter-agency coordination and establish new public-private partnerships to provide additional amenities, funding, networking, and co-production opportunities. Seek partnerships with other public agencies and public-private partnerships to provide recreational amenities, greenways, and services where mutually beneficial opportunities are available to ensure financial sustainability and quality of all programs. Page 172 of 310 79CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 5.8 Evaluate, amend, and develop relevant ordinances to protect natural resources, habitats, and green-water infrastructure. Consider amendments to the Parkland Dedication Ordinance and other ordinances to include provisions or incentives that encourage developers to design and build parks and greenway trails that preserve natural areas. 5.9 Investigate the feasibility of incorporating riparian buffer standards to preserve sensitive land along waterways. Consider the feasibility of amending ordinances to better preserve potentially sensitive land along waterways to mitigate flood risks, protect water quality, and provide for parks and greenway opportunities. 5.10 Consider new and enhanced natural resource management strategies that promote environmental sustainability and stewardship and improve quality of life. Consider the effect of urban heat islands on the City’s residents, wildlife, and natural environment. Identify areas for enhanced stewardship practices such as “no mow zones,” native or adaptive plantings, and pollinator areas to support wildlife and enhance biodiversity. 5.11 Invest in the redevelopment of existing parks. Identify new improvements and continue upgrades and maintenance to existing park facilities, particularly neighborhood scale parks as detailed in the Recreation, Park, and Open Space Master Plan, neighborhood, or district plans. 5.12 Conduct community-wide parks and recreation needs assessments and pursue recommended improvements. Evaluate facilities and programs provided by the Parks and Recreation Department through community surveys at least every five years. Pursue new programs, physical and operational improvements, and evaluate ongoing priorities to implement the needs assessment for park facilities and recreational programs. 5.13 Identify a land acquisition strategy and integrate additional greenspace. Establish a platform to provide a required and desirable amount of land per citizen, as discussed within the planning considerations. 5.14 Create connections between key elements of the parks, recreation, greenways systems, and destinations. As described in the Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan and the Recreation, Park, and Open Space Master Plan, prioritize opportunities to connect parks, greenways, community facilities, and other destinations. 5.15 Design and construct inclusive, accessible, and sustainable parks and greenway trails. Consider all citizens’ needs and provide a diverse range of facilities and amenities to accommodate a variety of experiences and ways of interacting with the world. Encourage developments that are oriented towards and designed for accessibility to parks and greenway trails. Page 173 of 310 The economic vitality, character, and identity of College Station depend, in part, upon a well-connected mobility system. College Station strives to have a system that provides for multiple modes in the face of an increasing population and traffic demands. Residents seek a system that responds to this mobility challenge in an integrated and context sensitive manner. Facilities should accommodate pedestrians, bicyclists, transit users, and motorists, furthering the City’s efforts to promote positive community character and identity for all who live, work, and visit College Station. INTEGRATED MOBILITY6 OCTOBER 14, 2021 Page 174 of 310 81CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Goal An innovative, safe, and well-connected, multi-modal mobility system serving all user types that is designed to support the surrounding land uses. Purpose The purpose of this chapter is to guide the creation and implementation of an orderly, reliable, and integrated mobility system considering all user types. The challenges facing the existing system necessitate strategic thought about how College Station plans land uses and supports appropriate densities, designs infrastructure projects that are safer and well-connected, and makes the mobility system more equitable and user-friendly for all modes. Of particular emphasis is protecting vulnerable road users including pedestrians and micromobility users like bicyclists. It also requires consideration of the natural environment, livability, and character of surrounding neighborhoods through context sensitive design, and supporting transit. Additionally, as transportation trends and technologies continue to evolve, it is imperative that the community’s mobility system is innovative and can adapt to changing needs and conditions. This chapter gives an overview of existing conditions, planning considerations associated with the City’s mobility needs and a discussion on design considerations. It also includes the Thoroughfare Plan (narrative and Map 6.3), which identifies the needs of the mobility system based on surrounding land uses and anticipated growth as well as serves as the foundation for the Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan. Finally, there is the identification of strategies and action recommendations that facilitate the development of an integrated mobility system. By living in a growing university community, College Station residents have mobility options beyond the private vehicle, including designated bicycle facilities, an extensive sidewalk network, and local transit services. Page 175 of 310 82CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Existing Conditions THOROUGHFARE NETWORK The thoroughfare network in College Station and its Extraterritorial Jurisdiction (ETJ) consists of more than 350 miles of existing streets. The Thoroughfare Plan develops a network of major streets made up of collectors, arterials, and freeways that include various levels of bicycle and pedestrian facilities. The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) plans, constructs, and maintains the freeways and most major arterial streets in collaboration with the City of College Station, with most other thoroughfares constructed and maintained by the City and Brazos County, and some by development. Many of the freeway and arterial streets have seen substantial increases in traffic volumes over recent decades, which has necessitated capital improvement projects. The City collaborates with TxDOT on capital improvements including roadway design and safety upgrades, pedestrian and bicycle improvements, and enhanced landscaping on roads managed by TxDOT. Information and maps related to the street network including traffic volumes and levels of service are available at the end of this chapter. BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN NETWORK The bicycle and pedestrian network is comprised of on-and off-street bicycle facilities, off-street shared- use paths, and sidewalks. Over the past several decades, the City has adopted a series of master plans addressing the needs of the community, most recently the Bicycle, Pedestrian and Greenways Master Plan adopted in 2010 and updated in 2018. This action-oriented plan has resulted in an expanded network through the addition of bicycle and pedestrian facilities on new and reconstructed streets, stand-alone projects on existing streets in older areas that when developed were not required to provide these facilities, and shared-use paths along the City’s greenways (also known as greenway trails), streets, and utility corridors. Texas A&M University has a similar network, facilitating movements on campus and linking with the City’s network at key intersections. TRANSIT A variety of organizations provide transit service in College Station, with the primary providers being Texas A&M University and the Brazos Transit District. Texas A&M University operates a transit network on and off campus for students, faculty and staff that carries over 6 million riders per year. Brazos Transit District operates a transit network for the general public that includes fixed routes, ADA paratransit, and demand and response service. Additionally, the College Station Independent School District operates a large fleet of buses used to transport students to and from its schools. AVIATION Easterwood Airport connects College Station to other metropolitan areas of Texas with connections to the nation. The airport is served by two commercial airlines and offers general aviation services. Page 176 of 310 83CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Figure 6.1: Activities Analyzed by Travel Demand Model Urban Activity Trip Frequency Destination Choice Mode Choice Roadway Route Choice Transit Route Choice Planning Considerations INCREASED DEMAND With the City’s population projected to increase at a 2.8% annual growth rate to approximately 162,500 by 2030, the demand for a safe, reliable mobility system within the City will increase as well. An increase in traffic demand can create additional traffic congestion and a degradation of levels of service for all modes. This presents an opportunity for the City to reinvigorate its mobility system by offering a wider range of quality mobility choices for residents and visitors. Providing a reliable mobility system moves not only people but goods and services that contribute to the economic vitality of the community. Without significant investments in new and expanded streets, pedestrian and bicycle facilities, and transit, the estimated travel demand will result in undesirable traffic congestion in numerous locations around the community. However, simply increasing street capacity does not solve traffic congestion as motorists soon fill the additional street space, following an economic principle known as induced demand (in everyday terms, “if you build it, they will come”). Rather, emphasis must be placed on an increased share of existing and future resources that support other modes to meet the citizens’ vision for a multi-modal system. To be successful, a travel demand management program should be incorporated to optimize the mobility system by helping to reduce vehicular trips and increase walking, bicycling, and transit ridership. Other strategies include rideshare programs, flexible work schedules, and telework. A shift in mode choice from a personal vehicle to other modes, however, can be difficult, especially if it compromises convenience and will require a holistic and intentional approach through education, encouragement, and infrastructure improvements. A travel demand model was prepared for this plan, in the manner depicted in Figure 6.1, Activities Analyzed by Travel Demand Model, using population projections and employment growth in coordination with the Future Land Use & Character Map (Map 2.2). The model was used to aid in developing the Thoroughfare Plan and determine mobility needs. Page 177 of 310 84CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN FACILITIES Well-connected and accessible bicycle and pedestrian facilities, as part of an integrated multi-modal mobility system, not only aid in reducing vehicle miles traveled but enhance quality of life, improve physical and mental health, and protect the environment. A complete mobility system that considers bicyclists and pedestrians should be equitable and socially sustainable by addressing the needs of all ages and abilities and those who cannot drive or choose not to drive. It should be inviting, safe, and provide space for streetscape elements to calm traffic and provide a more comfortable user experience. While automobiles will undoubtedly continue to play an important role in the City’s mobility system, expanding and enhancing the bicycle and pedestrian network is intended to shift some journeys away from personal vehicles. It is also important for the City to remain cognizant of trends and best management practices that encourage bicycling and walking. The Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan places a focus on creating safe and comfortable spaces for bicycling with separated bike lanes that help ensure and encourage increased use. They include on-street bike facilities with a vertical barrier and street side (or off-street) bike facilities behind the curb and adjacent to the sidewalk with some separation. The City should continue to identify where these types of facilities can be implemented to further efforts to increase ridership. The arrival of shared mobility has led to a term called micromobility. Micromobility refers to lightweight devices such as bicycles, scooters, skateboards, and hoverboards. They can be motorized, non-motorized, individually owned, or shared. In a community where personal autonomy is highly valued and intense summer heat often deters walking as a means of transportation, motorized micromobility has the potential to encourage increased use. In College Station, a variety of these vehicles are being used, primarily by students using personal devices and through Texas A&M University’s bike share program to travel to and from campus. The increased use of these different devices has created the need to consider how they will be safely managed and how the space that was previously occupied solely by bicycles is designed and used. Page 178 of 310 85CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN TRANSIT Transit will need to play an increasing role in the City’s mobility system to provide travel choices and help minimize expenses in expanding street capacity. Brazos Transit District is implementing fixed bus stop locations in many areas of the community though routes operate only on weekdays on generally an hourly basis and into the early evening. The Texas A&M University transit service operates for longer hours including weekends and provides service more frequently on its routes, though it covers a smaller area where there is a higher concentration of students, faculty, and staff. While providing valuable services and some congestion relief today, the limited network of current transit service will not adequately meet future needs. Expansion of transit services will be necessary to connect all major activity centers within College Station, including major employers, dense residential areas, concentrations of student housing, and critical services such as grocery stores and medical facilities. Also, Texas Central intends to provide high speed rail service that connect Dallas and Houston with a planned stop in Grimes County near State Highway 30. Transit or shuttle service should be coordinated so that College Station may be more conveniently linked to this planned regional service. In the planning of transit services, it is vital that consideration and access be prioritized for underserved populations and the general public. When the U.S. Census determines the urbanized areas of the cities of Bryan and College Station cumulatively exceed a population of 200,000, the Bryan-College Station Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) will be designated as a Transportation Management Area (TMA). The TMA designation results in reductions in federal funding for transit that would need to be supplemented by local jurisdictions to maintain the same funding and service. Implications of changes in the level of funding support and potential changes to service offerings will need to be coordinated with other regional partners. Page 179 of 310 86CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN EXISTING SYSTEM CONSTRAINTS The ability to meet future mobility needs is in part constrained by the existing network of streets and the surrounding natural and built environment. Rights-of-way in the core of the City where system improvements would be most beneficial in addressing traffic congestion concerns and providing a complete multi-modal system frequently have widths less than current standards and are commonly encumbered with utilities, mature vegetation, and canopy trees. These constraints make projects in these areas less feasible and undesirable due to costs for acquisition of rights-of-way, improvements, and utility relocations as well as disruption to existing adjacent development. With the constraints of the existing system, it is important to utilize it in the most efficient way possible to prioritize available space to be used by the most people and at most times of the day while being sensitive to the surrounding character and context. This can result in system corridors that are prioritized differently depending upon the mobility needs. For example, major thoroughfares may prioritize vehicles by including additional lanes or turn lanes while other thoroughfares may prioritize more complete bicycle and pedestrian facilities and not prioritize vehicles. In many instances, intersections are the main constraint in the mobility systems so prioritization of intersection improvements can provide tangible mobility benefits without having to disrupt the street corridor to the full extent along its entire length. RELATIONSHIP TO LAND USE PATTERN A very close relationship exists between the mobility system and land use patterns. For example, high-volume six-lane streets, dominated by the personal vehicle, tend to attract uses such as big-box retail and large apartment complexes, while deterring other land uses such as walkable neighborhoods. In a similar manner, land uses arranged in a mixed-use, dense pattern can reduce the frequency and length of vehicular trips, and if designed properly, can promote walking, biking, and transit use, therefore reducing the demand placed on the street network. The Future Land Use & Character Map defines an approach to land use planning and design that, when combined with a context sensitive solutions approach, will strengthen the transportation-land use relationship in a positive manner. CONNECTIVITY Poor street connectivity can degrade the overall efficiency of the mobility system as trips are funneled to fewer corridors and may cause the need for more substantial improvements. Development oriented around cul-de-sacs, as well as neighborhood opposition to street connectivity, has limited connectivity in the City in the past. Connectivity can also be limited where constrained by natural features such as floodplains. Future mobility system effectiveness necessitates improved connectivity to facilitate multiple routes to move traffic to and from destinations. Otherwise, traffic congestion will increase and can lead to additional traffic through neighborhoods. Increased connectivity must be balanced with resource protection and neighborhood concerns. Connectivity with and to each of the travel modes is crucial to future accessibility and mobility. Context sensitive design and traffic calming measures are essential components of any effort at increased connectivity. Context Sensitive Solutions (CSS) is a different approach to the design and planning of mobility projects. It balances the competing needs of stakeholders early on in the decision-making process. It offers flexibility in the application of design, considers aesthetics, and results in facilities that are safe and effective for all users regardless of the mode of travel they choose. Page 180 of 310 87CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Arterials spaced one-mile apart may carry significant traffic but may require six lanes, which may be inappropriate for many contexts and modes such as bicycling and walking. Closer spacing of arterials could carry the same volume of traffic, reduce the number of lanes necessary, and allow for multi-modal facilities such as bicycle facilities and wider sidewalks. Likewise, collectors spaced closer together result in shorter block lengths and promote greater pedestrian and bicycling activities. Local streets should connect as frequently as practical to the collector network to keep block lengths short and to promote connectivity throughout the system. TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION, PARKING, AND MOBILITY MANAGEMENT The rapid pace at which technology and development trends change presents new possibilities for mobility and land planning. Consideration is needed for Mobility as a Service and home delivery providers, new development trends, and autonomous vehicles. Digital technologies evolve at an expeditious pace, and while it is outside the scope of this plan to anticipate the next big technological trend, it is worth noting how companies like Uber, Zipcar, and Amazon have disrupted the transportation and retail sectors and have become engrained in daily life. The convenience provided by these and other home delivery services offers an opportunity to consider approaches related to ride-hailing, ridesharing, shared-fleet services, and parking management. Transit and micromobility service offerings can be fragmented with information that can be difficult to find. A user-friendly web-based tool or app with comprehensive information could more clearly communicate available mobility options other than private vehicles. The consideration of parking requirements could free up developable land and allow space for circulation and pickup/drop-off zones within new developments. The development and deployment of autonomous vehicles also needs to be a consideration in the future planning horizon. Availability of shared autonomous vehicle fleets could prompt a decrease in persons owning a personal vehicle, alter parking supply needs, and result in changing demands on the mobility system. FUNDING Adequate funding is necessary to construct, operate, and maintain a mobility system that is effective and safe. Various funding sources are available at the local, state, and federal level. At the local level, funds include bond programs, certificates of obligation, roadway maintenance fees, and general tax revenues. New development also constructs and dedicates a portion of street, bicycle, and pedestrian improvements as part of the development process along with contributing roadway impact fees and fee-in-lieu of sidewalk construction, as applicable. At the state and federal level, funding is prioritized and programmed through regional partners such as the Bryan-College Station MPO, TxDOT, and the Brazos County Regional Mobility Authority (RMA). Some grant funding opportunities also exist through Community Development Block Grant funds and other state and federal programs. The Thoroughfare Plan is intended to consider the ultimate development of the City and the street network needs. This can make it challenging to consider financial constraints as the need for most planned improvements depend upon the timing, location, and degree of demand generated by new development. In evaluating how to best maximize the use of existing funds, a recommended approach is to focus financial planning efforts by prioritizing the short and near-term needs. EXTRATERRITORIAL JURISDICTION The Thoroughfare Plan includes a street network in the ETJ to ensure the reservation of adequate rights- of-way in a pattern that is dense enough to provide connectivity outside of the city limits. In 2019, the Texas Page 181 of 310 88CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN State Legislature limited the ability of cities to annex, essentially requiring consent by the residents and/ or property owners within a potential annexation area. With limited opportunity for annexation, the City will need to continue utilizing other growth management tools such as development agreements and Municipal Utility Districts (MUDs) to provide services in the ETJ. The changes in annexation law inadvertently encourage a renewed focus upon infill and redevelopment within the existing city limits. Additional density within the City’s core can help drive demand for and support the provision of transit and alternative transportation modes. However, areas in the ETJ must still be connected to the rest of the planning jurisdiction to provide for connectivity if development on the City’s fringes or annexation does occur in the future. PLANNING HORIZON Though full build-out of the City is beyond the planning horizon of this Comprehensive Plan, the plan’s framework must consider the mobility needs of the community as it approaches build-out or the complete development of all developable land in the City. This foresight is necessary to ensure that actions taken within this planning timeframe do not preclude future options and offer more opportunities for future decision-makers. An example of this approach is ensuring that rights- of-way are planned and reserved for a future street network, even though this capacity is not expected to be necessary within this planning timeframe. More efficient and higher capacity streets, increased access management along heavily traveled corridors, increased reliance on bicycling, walking, and transit, and the emergence of dense mixed-use developments are just a few of the possible strategies to serve the build-out population. This plan must respond to this possible future by providing a high level of connectivity with and to each travel mode and ensure that rights-of-way are appropriate to accommodate future mobility needs. Access management employed where appropriate along with street designs that promote multi-modal solutions should also be considered along with an expansion into future services such as bus rapid transit, light rail, and land use designations that continue to encourage dense mixed-use development where and when appropriate. REGIONAL MOBILITY PARTNERS The City of College Station is one of many entities that has a role in planning, funding, constructing, and operating mobility facilities. Other entities include the RMA, Bryan-College Station MPO, TxDOT, Brazos Valley Council of Governments (BVCOG), Brazos County, Brazos Transit District, Texas A&M University, and the College Station Independent School District. Coordination between these entities is vital to creating a well-connected system that supports the mobility needs of the region. The RMA is an independent governmental agency created by the State of Texas to provide the Brazos County community with a means of addressing safety and congestion through community consensus. They work with local jurisdictions and other regional partners to identify funding and help implement the future vision of transportation in Brazos County - “Through community consensus, plan, develop and operate a quality transportation system for people and goods that promotes safety, enhances quality of life and supports economic opportunity throughout Brazos County.” Sixteen regional entities, including the City of College Station, have committed to collaborating to achieve this vision. Page 182 of 310 89CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN The MPO serves as a partner that coordinates regional transportation planning and manages federal transportation funding that comes to the region. They maintain the Metropolitan Transportation Plan and the Transportation Improvement Program. The City has representation on the Policy Board, Technical Advisory Committee, and Active Transportation Advisory Panel. TxDOT is responsible for planning, constructing, and maintaining most of the City’s primary mobility corridors, including State Highway 6, University Drive (FM 60), George Bush Drive (FM 2347), Harvey Road (SH 30), William D. Fitch Parkway (SH 40), Harvey Mitchell Parkway (FM 2818), Wellborn Road (FM 2154), and Texas Avenue (BUS 6). They also partner with the City to enhance landscaping within state highway rights-of-way, provide funding for pedestrian and bicycle facilities, and other safety improvements. The BVCOG is also a regional partner who focuses on a variety of topics of importance to its members. They are involved in planning for and operating transit services for the elderly through the Area Agency on Aging. Thoroughfare Plan The Thoroughfare Plan is based on the projected traffic demand resulting from the anticipated growth in population and employment and is guided by the proposed Future Land Use & Character Map. In the development of the Thoroughfare Plan, a travel demand model was used to project the increase in vehicle trips. This information was used to identify the needed function of the various transportation corridors such as an arterial or collector. This information also aided in identifying the location of new streets needed either for capacity enhancements or to provide connectivity, as well as the number of lanes needed for each of the streets in the system. With the original planning efforts in 2009, three street network scenarios were developed based on results from the travel demand model. Each of these scenarios were tested against the community’s goals and preferences identified in the development of this plan. This testing resulted in the selection of a preferred scenario that was adopted. While amendments to the Thoroughfare Plan have occurred since 2009, the approach identified with the preferred scenario remains applicable. Each scenario that was considered is briefly discussed below. CURRENT-NETWORK OPTION This scenario focused future efforts on maintaining the streets and lanes currently in place, with the additional construction of new streets to serve private development. This scenario resulted in increased congestion and degradation of levels of service in some of the busiest areas though much of the network would likely continue to function at acceptable levels of service. This scenario could promote a greater reliance on transit and other modes of travel, though without the construction of additional facilities the success of these options was considered questionable. Though offering some advantages, this scenario was rejected due to the increase in unacceptable levels of congestion, which conflicted with the community’s desire to manage and reduce congestion. PROGRAMMED-PROJECT OPTION This scenario focused future efforts on expanding the capacity of existing streets, adding new streets, and increasing multi-modal facilities and options as was currently programmed. This scenario would result in the construction of more than 130 lane miles in addition to the construction of local streets necessary to serve private development, several miles of off-street shared use paths, and continued maintenance of the existing Page 183 of 310 90CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN transit system. It was anticipated this scenario would require more than $200 million (in 2009 dollars) in public funds, as well as expenditures by development interests on streets serving private development. This scenario accommodated the projected increase in vehicle miles. However, it also resulted in a slight increase in congestion and degradation of levels of service in specific areas along the network. This scenario depended on an increase in the use of alternative modes of travel. A modified version of this scenario was selected as the preferred scenario due to its fiscal practicality, its ability to support expansion of multi-modal opportunities, and its response to the community desire to manage and reduce congestion. This option necessitates land use planning that promotes alternative modes of transportation and reduces the frequency and length of vehicular trips. Additionally, the selected option requires an increased investment in transit and enhancement of the Thoroughfare Plan in the ETJ to reserve rights-of-way for future needs and facilitates connectivity. CONGESTION-REDUCTION OPTION This scenario focused future efforts on substantial expansion of street capacity and the construction of new streets. This scenario would result in the construction of more than 440 lane miles in addition to the construction of local streets necessary to serve private development, several miles of off-street shared use paths, and continued maintenance of the existing transit system. It was anticipated this scenario would require more than $650 million (in 2009 dollars) in public funds, as well as expenditures by development interests on streets serving private development. This scenario accommodated the projected increase in vehicle miles, with a decrease in congestion and maintenance or improvement in levels of service throughout the network. This scenario depended on an Page 184 of 310 91CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN increase in the use of alternative modes of travel, though the general lack of congestion and abundance of six-lane streets would reduce the likelihood of this occurring. Though meeting the community’s desire to reduce congestion, this option was rejected due to its high costs and incompatibility with other community goals and strategies. PREFERRED SCENARIO A modified version of the Programmed-Project Option was selected as the preferred scenario based on its multi-modal cost-effective approach to managing increasing transportation demands balanced with other community goals and objectives. All new and expanded streets must meet the multi-modal objectives of this plan. Additional funding must be provided for improvements and expansion to the bicycle, pedestrian, and transit networks in the City. Finally, it is essential that all streets be designed to enhance their context. FUNCTIONAL CLASSIFICATION Functional classification categorizes streets according to the category’s traffic service function they are intended to provide. All streets are grouped into a class depending on the character of traffic and the degree of land access they allow. For the purposes of this plan streets are divided into six thoroughfare classes: freeway/expressway, major arterial (4-lane and 6-lane), minor arterial, major collector, and minor collector. Freeways/expressways are intended to carry the highest volumes of traffic for the longest distances with the least amount of direct access. Arterials carry a high volume of traffic and are intended to move traffic in, out, or around the City. Collectors carry a smaller volume of traffic and allow more access to abutting properties. Local or residential streets are not considered part of the Thoroughfare Plan as they are intended to carry low volumes of traffic at slow speeds for short distances and offer the highest level of access and connectivity. Functional classification identifies the necessary right-of-way width, number of lanes, and design speed for the thoroughfares. The Thoroughfare Plan and its anticipated performance are depicted in the following maps: Map 6.1 - 2045 Number of Lanes; Map 6.2 - 2045 Traffic Volumes with Programmed Projects; Map 6.3 - Thoroughfare Plan – Functional Classification & Context Zones; and Map 6.4 – 2045 Future Levels of Service. Page 185 of 310 92CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Design Considerations COMPLETE STREETS Complete Streets are streets designed for everyone with safe access for bicyclists, pedestrians, transit users, and motorists of all ages and abilities. There is no single design for a Complete Street. Each one is unique and should relate to its surrounding community context, thus integrating with the context sensitive approach outlined below. In contrast, incomplete streets are designed with only automobiles in mind, making alternative transportation choices difficult, inconvenient, and often dangerous. Complete Streets typically offer many of the benefits that are sought through traditional street design: increased capacity, decreased travel times, and enhanced safety. Typically, design targets increased street performance through the addition of vehicle travel lanes. As mentioned previously, adding lanes can induce demand and does not solve congestion issues on its own. With Complete Streets, street design might prioritize enhancing sidewalks or pedestrian crossings or repurposing on-street parking for another mode of travel such as bicycling. Every person who then chooses these other modes of travel is one less driver on city streets, which reduces congestion and extends the service life of streets. CONTEXT SENSITIVE SOLUTIONS Context Sensitive Solutions (CSS) is taking the goal of Complete Streets and applying it to the process of determining street cross sections that are most appropriate during construction or reconstruction projects. CSS is a way of planning and building a mobility system that balances the many needs of diverse stakeholders. It also offers flexibility in the application of design, considers aesthetics and results in facilities that are safe and effective for all users regardless of the mode of travel they choose. These considerations include the context and character of development in an area, future goals for a corridor, and existing or future needs. While an acceptable Complete Street may be achieved through the construction of a typical street section design, the CSS process should be used to determine if and to what degree the design may need to be changed to achieve the most appropriate section for a corridor. All necessary information should be assembled to best guide the street design process. This information should include both traditional thoroughfare functionality as well as conditions of the surrounding environment. The Thoroughfare Plan should be referenced to identify the street functional class and the surrounding context zones. The identified context zones include Urban Core, General Urban, Suburban, and Rural and is represented in Map 6.3 Thoroughfare Plan – Functional Classification & Context Zones. College Station has numerous tools to select an appropriate Complete Street design – a set of typical cross sections and a set of recommended context-sensitive cross sections. During new construction, reconstruction, or widening projects, it should be determined if the typical cross section is most appropriate to achieve the corridor’s planned transportation goals. If other travel modes or design elements should be prioritized, then the most appropriate alternative context-sensitive cross sections should be selected. Page 186 of 310 93CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN In general, CSS focus on thoroughfares (arterials and collectors), which are the streets that play the most significant roles in the street network and offer the greatest multi-modal opportunities. Primary mobility routes or freeways, such as State Highway 6, are generally intended to move very high volumes of high- speed traffic through College Station, providing connections to the larger region. These streets should be the focus of their own unique planning and design process through CSS. Similarly, local or residential streets are generally not the focus of CSS, however, they should be designed to accommodate bicyclists and pedestrians and should be interconnected to one another and into the larger street network. PRIORITIZED MODE CORRIDORS The existing mobility network has been constructed as the City has grown over time. Many of the network corridors have constrained right-of-way or narrower pavement widths that may limit the use of the standard cross section options. In particular, retrofit projects where bicycle and pedestrian elements are being introduced within existing developed areas may necessitate the development of unique design options. Ideal cross sections may be difficult to achieve that have the full provision of complete facilities for all modes due to funding constraints or resulting impacts on surrounding land uses. With these constraints, different network corridors should be prioritized for different modes. This approach allows a more limited but feasible mobility network to be created in the constrained environment to provide adequate accommodation for the various modes. As mentioned, freeways and major arterial corridors are intended to move high volumes of high-speed traffic and provide regional connectivity. While it may be possible that these corridors be designed to handle bicyclists and pedestrians, in general they are designed to accommodate high volumes of vehicular traffic. These corridors also can carry transit vehicles though accommodating transit stops is more challenging. Alternative parallel routes should be identified to prioritize modes of travel that cannot be accommodated on adjacent corridors. Major Collector and Minor Collector corridors are intended to move lower volumes of vehicular traffic at lower speeds thus providing an opportunity to emphasize non-vehicular modes. INTERSECTIONS The design and operation of intersections have significant impact on the mobility network and context sensitive design plays a critical role. Multi-modal systems require the safe movement of pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorists through intersections. Intersection design encompasses the intersection itself and the approaches to the intersection and may impact adjacent land uses. The Institute of Transportation Engineers has identified the following principles for the design and operation of intermodal intersections: • Minimize conflicts between modes • Accommodate all modes with the appropriate levels of service for pedestrians, bicyclists, transit, and motorists • Avoid elimination of any travel modes due to intersection design • Provide good driver and non-driver visibility • Minimize pedestrian exposure to moving traffic • Design for low speeds at critical pedestrian-vehicle conflict points • Avoid extreme intersection angles and break up complex intersections with pedestrian refuge islands, and Page 187 of 310 94CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN • Ensure intersections are safe and fully accessible for all, with provisions for people of varying abilities and people with vision or hearing impairments As a street network experiences more traffic congestion, intersections become the weak link or choke point in the mobility system and are the location of the greatest conflict points and safety concerns between different modes and users. In many instances, existing intersections have been designed to prioritize vehicles and have resulted in gaps for other, more vulnerable users at the locations of greatest conflict. Innovations in intersection design in recent decades have developed alternatives to the traditional intersection that offer options to enhance safety that can also maintain or increase street capacity. Some examples of these intersections include modern roundabouts, protected intersections for vulnerable street users, and cross-over intersections like the diverging diamond interchange and displaced left intersections. As mobility needs are assessed and prioritized, a greater emphasis should be placed on intersection improvements that remove gaps in the mobility system and appropriately accommodate all users within the given context. OTHER CONSIDERATIONS In complete street and context sensitive design, several other design components must be considered that respond to creating an integrated mobility system. These include, but are not limited to design speed, access management along with the placement and design of crosswalks, bus stops, curb extensions, and pedestrian refuges. Guidance documents from the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE), American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), and National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) should be consulted for the proper and safe application of these components. Page 188 of 310 95CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Strategic & Ongoing Actions The actions listed below are aimed at implementing the goal of an innovative, safe, and well-connected, multi-modal mobility system serving all user types that is designed to support the surrounding land uses. The actions include strategic items as well as ongoing efforts undertaken by the City. STRATEGIC ACTIONS 6.1 Implement complete street and context sensitive design. Amend the street cross sections and update the Unified Development Ordinance, the Bryan-College Station Unified Design Guidelines, and the City’s capital improvement process to implement context sensitive and complete street design such as prioritized mode corridors, reconstruction projects in established neighborhoods, and in areas where right-of-way is constrained. 6.2 Conduct a Thoroughfare Plan audit. Consider alternatives to relieve congestion anticipated with long term growth and evaluate adjustments to the Thoroughfare Plan based on existing street context. 6.3 Enhance and upgrade intersections. Improve multimodal efficiency through roundabouts and protected intersections to improve safety and reduce congestion. 6.4 Continue to evaluate and implement best management practices to increase bicycle and pedestrian use. Build on the existing network of infrastructure to increase safety and comfort for all users such as separated bike lanes and shared use paths. 6.5 Undertake streetscape improvements within gateways and image corridors. Identify locations and implement targeted infrastructure and streetscape improvements (perhaps through partnerships) to improve aesthetics. Consider operation and maintenance costs when identifying appropriate improvements. 6.6 Evaluate transit funding partnerships. To prepare for reductions in Federal transit funding from the region’s growth, the City should explore regional partnerships to maintain and improve transit services. Transit services should link activity centers, major employers, dense residential areas, concentrations of student housing, and provide access for underserved populations and the general public. 6.7 Prioritize programs and improvements that will reduce vehicular demand. Consider an emphasis on bicycle and pedestrian facilities, transit services, parking and other programs that can reduce vehicular demand, particularly in areas adjacent to campus. ONGOING ACTIONS AND POLICY DIRECTION 6.8 Maintain the various funding programs for mobility projects. These include the Bryan-College Station Metropolitan Planning Organization Transportation Improvement Program, the Brazos County Regional Mobility Authority, and the City’s capital improvements program. 6.9 Fund bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure and safety improvements. Dedicate funding for system improvements and maintain collaborative partnerships as detailed in the Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan. Page 189 of 310 96CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 6.10 Develop performance measures, collect transportation data, and monitor trends. Performance measures will help evaluate the effectiveness of the mobility system. Data to be collected could include traffic volumes, levels of service, vehicle miles traveled, transit ridership, pedestrian and bicycle facility usage, and safety data on vehicle crashes and those involving bicyclists or pedestrians. This data will also help to target future improvements. 6.11 Evaluate Traffic Impact Analysis (TIA) requirements. Consider updates to the traffic mitigation thresholds for intersections impacted by new development. The requirements could also be amended to address internal site elements such as circulation, queuing, connectivity, as well as bicycle/pedestrian infrastructure. 6.12 Evaluate and update access management strategies. Coordinate with the Bryan-College Station Metropolitan Planning Organization to align regional standards along thoroughfares to preserve modal efficiency throughout the street network. 6.13 Develop and implement a travel demand management program. Build upon existing services and including real-time traffic information, traffic incident alerts, ridesharing programs, promotion of flexible work schedules, and encouragement of dense mixed-use development in strategic areas. Page 190 of 310 M AP 6.1 2045 Number of Lanes COLLEGE STATION CITY LIMITS BRYAN CITY LIMITS COLLEGE STATION ETJ BRYANBRYANBRYAN UNIVERSITY DRUNIVERSITY DRUNIVERSITY DRGEORGE BUSH DRGEORGE BUSH DRGEORGE BUSH DRSOUTH WEST SOUTH WEST SOUTH WEST FM 2818FM 2818FM 2818 TE X A S A V E S TE X A S A V E S TE X A S A V E S F M 2 1 5 4 F M 2 1 5 4 F M 2 1 5 4 S H 6 S S H 6 S S H 6 S HARVEY RDHARVEY RDHARVEY RDGRAHAM RDGRAHAM RDGRAHAM RDBARRON RDBARRON RDBARRON RDHOLLEMAN DR SHOLLEMAN DR SHOLLEMAN DR S S H 6 S S H 6 S S H 6 SWILLIAM D. FITCH PKWYWILLIAM D. FITCH PKWYWILLIAM D. FITCH PKWYROCKROCKROCK PRAIRIEPRAIRIEPRAIRIE RDRDRD GREENS PRAIRIE RDGREENS PRAIRIE RDGREENS PRAIRIE RDHWY 30 FM 2 1 5 4 FM 2 1 5 4 FM 2 1 5 4FM 60FM 60FM 60PKPKWW YYPKW Y2-3 LANE ROADWAY 4 LANE ROADWAY 6 LANE ROADWAY Page 191 of 310 M AP 6.2 2045 Traffic Volumes with Programmed Projects COLLEGE STATION CITY LIMITS BRYAN CITY LIMITS COLLEGE STATION ETJ BRYANBRYANBRYAN UNIVERSITY DRUNIVERSITY DRUNIVERSITY DRGEORGE BUSH DRGEORGE BUSH DRGEORGE BUSH DRSOUTH WEST SOUTH WEST SOUTH WEST FM 2818FM 2818FM 2818 TE X A S A V E S TE X A S A V E S TE X A S A V E S F M 2 1 5 4 F M 2 1 5 4 F M 2 1 5 4 S H 6 S S H 6 S S H 6 S HARVEY RDHARVEY RDHARVEY RDGRAHAM RDGRAHAM RDGRAHAM RDBARRON RDBARRON RDBARRON RDHOLLEMAN DR SHOLLEMAN DR SHOLLEMAN DR S S H 6 S S H 6 S S H 6 SWILLIAM D. FITCH PKWYWILLIAM D. FITCH PKWYWILLIAM D. FITCH PKWYROCKROCKROCK PRAIRIEPRAIRIEPRAIRIE RDRDRD GREENS PRAIRIE RDGREENS PRAIRIE RDGREENS PRAIRIE RDHWY 30 FM 2 1 5 4 FM 2 1 5 4 FM 2 1 5 4FM 60FM 60FM 60PKPKWW YYPKW Y0 - 5,000 5,000 - 15,000 15,001 - 25,000 25,001 - 40,000 40,000 - 65,000 Page 192 of 310 M AP 6.3 Functional Classification & Context Class UNIVERSITY DRUNIVERSITY DRUNIVERSITY DRGEORGE BUSH DRGEORGE BUSH DRGEORGE BUSH DRSOUTH WEST SOUTH WEST SOUTH WEST PKPKWWYYPKWYFM 2818FM 2818FM 2818 TE X A S A V E S TE X A S A V E S TE X A S A V E S F M 2 1 5 4 F M 2 1 5 4 F M 2 1 5 4 SH 6 SSH 6 SSH 6 SHARVEY RDHARVEY RDHARVEY RDGRAHAM RDGRAHAM RDGRAHAM RDBARRON RDBARRON RDBARRON RDHOLLEMAN DR SHOLLEMAN DR SHOLLEMAN DR S S H 6 S S H 6 S S H 6 SWILLIAM D. FITCH PKWYWILLIAM D. FITCH PKWYWILLIAM D. FITCH PKWYROCKROCKROCK PRAIRIEPRAIRIEPRAIRIE RDRDRD GREENS PRAIRIE RDGREENS PRAIRIE RDGREENS PRAIRIE RDHWY 30 FM 2 1 5 4 FM 2 1 5 4 FM 2 1 5 4FM 60FM 60FM 60MINOR COLLECTOR MAJOR COLLECTOR MINOR ARTERIAL 4 LANE MAJOR ARTERIAL 6 LANE MAJOR ARTERIAL FREEWAY/EXPRESSWAY GRADE SEPARATION THOROUGHFARE PLAN URBAN CORE GENERAL URBAN SUBURBAN RURAL CONTEXT ZONES CITY LIMITS ETJ BRYANBRYANBRYAN Page 193 of 310 M AP 6.4 2045 Future Levels of Service COLLEGE STATION CITY LIMITS BRYAN CITY LIMITS COLLEGE STATION ETJ ACCEPTABLE TOLERABLE UNACCEPTABLE BRYANBRYANBRYAN UNIVERSITY DRUNIVERSITY DRUNIVERSITY DRGEORGE BUSH DRGEORGE BUSH DRGEORGE BUSH DRSOUTH WEST SOUTH WEST SOUTH WEST FM 2818FM 2818FM 2818 TE X A S A V E S TE X A S A V E S TE X A S A V E S F M 2 1 5 4 F M 2 1 5 4 F M 2 1 5 4 S H 6 S S H 6 S S H 6 S HARVEY RDHARVEY RDHARVEY RDGRAHAM RDGRAHAM RDGRAHAM RDBARRON RDBARRON RDBARRON RDHOLLEMAN DR SHOLLEMAN DR SHOLLEMAN DR S S H 6 S S H 6 S S H 6 SWILLIAM D. FITCH PKWYWILLIAM D. FITCH PKWYWILLIAM D. FITCH PKWYROCKROCKROCK PRAIRIEPRAIRIEPRAIRIE RDRDRD GREENS PRAIRIE RDGREENS PRAIRIE RDGREENS PRAIRIE RDHWY 30 FM 2 1 5 4 FM 2 1 5 4 FM 2 1 5 4FM 60FM 60FM 60PKPKWW YYPKW YPage 194 of 310 In order to meet the needs of a growing community, the City of College Station must be proactive in planning for adequate public facilities and services for its residents. The availability of both basic utilities and public safety services are good indicators of how well a city is positioned to serve new growth. 7 EXCEPTIONAL SERVICES OCTOBER 14, 2021 Page 195 of 310 102CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Goal Exceptional municipal facilities and services that meet community needs, contribute to community character, exhibit environmental stewardship and resiliency, support surrounding land uses, incorporate full life-cycle costs, and are coordinated and fiscally responsible. Municipal Services Over the last decade, College Station has experienced significant growth that increased demand on all City services. The desire to deliver quality services necessitates careful and thoughtful planning to ensure municipal services are maintained at the highest possible level, while maintaining fiscal responsibility on behalf of the residents of College Station. The complexity of the municipal service delivery system requires an integrated and strategic approach to service delivery planning. Consideration must be given to ensuring citizen and customer access to all desired services. Attention must also be given to the cost of services – for ongoing provision and maintenance as well as future expansion – so that municipal services are both cost effective to deliver and affordable to citizens. Community Facilities This chapter also addresses the provision of community facilities, another significant City responsibility and a major component of College Station’s physical, social, and economic fabric. Population growth and geographic expansion represent significant challenges to the City of College Station. Planning for community facilities, staffing, and equipment must be done well in advance to avoid gaps in services. Facilities often involve major capital investments and require time for implementation. Affordability must be balanced with community needs, and new facilities must be prioritized in terms of strategic importance to the community to address current and future needs. Along with new construction, adequate attention must be given to expansion, maintenance, and modernization of existing facilities. Page 196 of 310 103CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Purpose The core mission of the City of College Station is the delivery of exceptional services to its citizens. Infrastructure is the backbone of the service delivery system and College Station must continually make prudent investments to maintain and grow its infrastructure to support the delivery of services. College Station’s core services should be of the highest quality and should be customer focused, timely, and cost effective. Based on recent trends and a 2.8% growth rate, College Station’s population is projected to exceed 162,500 by the year 2030. This population growth will continue to result in increased demand for City services. The expansion of City services and facilities to support the anticipated population growth, as well as proactive maintenance and rehabilitation of existing infrastructure systems and facilities for increased reliability, is paramount to the implementation of the Comprehensive Plan. The purpose of this chapter is to recognize College Station’s current service levels and to plan for the expansion of City services by providing the foundation for the implementation of the City’s various master plans that are intended to support the planned growth and development pattern described in Chapter 2: Distinctive Places. Strategic actions are provided to guide future decisions that assure both municipal service and facilities needs of the community are met. Additional information related to the City’s future infrastructure needs can be found in Chapter 8: Managed Growth, as well as in the individual utility master plans and the Capital Improvement Plan. Detailed information including existing levels of service, future staffing needs, and proposed capital expenditures for all City services can be found in the strategic plans maintained by each City department. Planning Considerations College Station’s growth must be well planned to avoid infrastructure and service delivery level degradation. Most significantly, water, wastewater, and roadway infrastructure must be developed and rehabilitated to serve the projected population growth based on the location and density of the future land uses presented in Chapter 2: Distinctive Places. The City has a responsibility to provide adequate staffing levels to meet basic response and operating standards and ensure personnel safety, as well as planning for and investing in facilities that are sufficient in location, design, and functionality to provide reliable response and service area coverage. To provide efficient services at the lowest cost to its residents, College Station should encourage growth, new development, and infill development in areas that are adequately served by existing infrastructure and current staffing levels. Higher density land uses should not be projected for areas that are not readily served by existing infrastructure. Each of the services provided by the City of College Station has several planning considerations that contribute to the development of the strategic actions included in this chapter. The following City services and their associated facilities are discussed in further detail below: • Police • Fire & Emergency Medical Services (EMS) • Emergency Management • Electric • Water • Wastewater • Solid Waste & Recycling • Street, Traffic System & Drainage Maintenance • Planning & Development Services • Community Services • Neighborhood Services • Economic Development & Tourism • Parks & Recreation • Library Services • Fiber Optic Network, and • General Municipal Administration Page 197 of 310 104CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Police – College Station Police Department SERVICES The College Station Police Department is accredited by the Commission on the Accreditation of Law Enforcement Agencies and is responsible for the protection of life, liberty, and property within the City limits. It provides these services through various means including criminal law enforcement, education, property recovery, animal control, emergency communications, traffic enforcement, and investigation of crime. Jurisdiction is shared with the Texas Department of Public Safety, Texas A&M University Police Department, federal law enforcement agencies, the Brazos County Sheriff’s Department, and the constables and Justice of the Peace courts all having jurisdiction within the City limits of College Station. The College Station Police Department has several special teams such as the SWAT team, Bomb team, College Station Tourism and Entertainment Policing unit (CSTEP) in Northgate, hostage negotiation team, K‐9 Units, Honor Guard, Motors Unit, Community Enhancement Unit, and Victim Services. In 2009, the College Station Police Department implemented a policing structure designed to provide geographic accountability and foster stronger community bonds. Since that time there have been modifications to the program. Technological advances challenged the Community Policing model for a period of time, but today the department has overcome those difficulties and actively works to build positive community bonds through geographic accountability. In addition to our Community Policing efforts, the Community Enhancement Unit works to develop outreach programs such as Family Fish, Citizen Police Academy, and Coffee with a Cop. Officers working in the geographic accountability model bring forth and promote effective management and accountability for the criminal activity and occurrences in each officers’ assigned beat. The goal of geographic accountability is to ensure faster response times to calls for assistance and make the officers more familiar with specific areas and residents. By getting to know our citizens, residents will become more comfortable with the presence of officers and feel safer as a result. FACILITIES College Station Police Department operates out of a new station on the corner of Dartmouth Street and Krenek Tap Road. The new police department was constructed to allow for future growth. The nature of policing places response units in the field, therefore, the need for satellite offices due to projected growth is not likely. FUTURE NEEDS The department’s Community-Oriented Policing philosophy requires small, manageable beats to be formed and maintained where staff is held to a high level of geographical accountability for successful outcomes. Maintaining adequate staffing to fulfill these geographic demands is vital. These demands increase as population increases and development occurs. As the City continues to grow, it is imperative that the department grow as well. The College Station Police Department has a history of dedicated customer service. To continue providing quality customer service, the City must address the needs of today and tomorrow on a continual basis. Page 198 of 310 105CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Fire & Emergency Medical Services (EMS) – College Station Fire Department SERVICES The College Station Fire Department (CSFD) is accredited through the Commission on Fire Accreditation International. The department is one of only eight municipal fire departments in Texas that maintains accreditation. College Station is an Insurance Services Office (ISO) Class 1 Community, meaning it’s fire department, water distribution system, and emergency dispatch center meet the highest standards set by ISO. CSFD provides prevention, suppression, advanced life support emergency medical services (EMS) and transport, community risk reduction programs, health and fire safety education, emergency management, and special operations. The primary response area for EMS is the City of College Station and southern Brazos County. Secondary response includes automatic aid to the City of Bryan. Mutual aid agreements for EMS are in place with Texas A&M University EMS and St. Joseph EMS. The primary response area for fire is the City of College Station and the Texas A&M University campus. Secondary response includes automatic aid with the City of Bryan. Mutual aid agreements for fire suppression are in place with Brazos County volunteer fire departments and Brayton Fire Training School for times of extreme need. The department has a goal of a 6-minute 30-second response time from the time a 9-1-1 call is answered until the first unit arrives on the scene. In 2020, the department responded to over 10,000 calls for service. Approximately 70-80% of the calls were for EMS. FACILITIES The department has 166 full time employees, with 147 who are assigned to three 24-hour rotating shifts. The other 19 employees are chief officers and administrators on a regular work schedule. At least 39 are required to report for duty each shift. The department requires at least one paramedic on each apparatus. The department staffs five fire engines, two ladder trucks, one quint, four ambulances, one airport rescue truck, one water tender, one safety vehicle and one command vehicle. One wildland truck and one special operations/hazmat truck are cross-staffed. Of the six fire stations in College Station, five are owned by the City and one is owned by the Texas A&M University System. The fire stations are located throughout the city at Holleman Drive (Fire Station No. 1), Rio Grande Boulevard (Fire Station No. 2), Barron Road (Fire Station No. 3), at Easterwood Airport (Fire Station No. 4 – owned by Texas A&M University System), William D. Fitch Parkway (Fire Station No. 5) and University Drive (Fire Station No. 6). Station 6 was built in 2012 and is the newest station. The department plans to build Station 7 beginning in 2023. ISO Ratings Insurance Service Office classifies communities from 1 (the best) to 10 (the worst) based on how well they score on the ISO Fire Suppression Rating Schedule. ISO bases this score on a number of factors including training, staffing, number of fire stations, equipment dispatched to fires, equipment on trucks, fire prevention, investigation, fire safety education, construction code enforcement, hydrant maintenance, water supply, and the ability of the 911 center to answer and dispatch calls. Insurance companies use Public Protection Classification information to establish fire insurance rates for homeowners in the City. A lower rating can result in savings to homeowners in the City due to lower insurance premiums. Page 199 of 310 106CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE NEEDS Current and short-term department needs are published in the annual city budget, including a schedule for additional personnel, equipment, and facilities. CSFD maintains a three-year strategic plan that ties into the City Council Strategic Plan. The department is committed to continuous improvement and needs consistent, robust data analysis. The data the department should consistently analyze for emerging trends and decision making are: • Population density • Call type and volume • Response times for first-arriving units and full-alarms The department has commissioned one-time studies and produced internal ad-hoc reports, but long-term analysis is needed for far-reaching decisions, such as the location and staffing requirements of future fire stations. Future facilities, equipment, and personnel must be strategically deployed in College Station to meet National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) personnel and response time standards, including: • Four-member engine companies (NFPA 1710-2020, 5.2.3.1.1) • Incident Command Technicians to serve as Chief’s Aides (NFPA 1710-2020, 5.2.2.2.5) • Four-minute travel time for 90% first-due unit of responses (NFPA 1710-2020, 4.1.2.1(3) and 4.1.2.4) The department needs to remain engaged with community partners – hospital systems, social workers, and the community health district – to evaluate the feasibility of community paramedicine. This is an emerging field that uses a comprehensive approach and integrated deployment model to connect underserved populations to underutilized services, helping to decrease strain on emergency rooms, hospitals, and first responders. Page 200 of 310 107CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Emergency Management – College Station Fire Department SERVICES College Station Fire also oversees the City’s Emergency Management Division, which provides planning efforts in preparation of all emergencies and disasters. The City’s approach to emergency management is largely interjurisdictional, with most efforts being in collaboration with Texas A&M University, the City of Bryan, and Brazos County. The Emergency Management Division maintains plans detailing the City’s response to various disasters including drought, fires, floods, tornadoes, and winter storms. The goal of these plans to create a more resilient College Station by responding with effectiveness and recovering efficiently. Emergency Management participates in a range of activities that fall into four categories: mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. • Mitigation is aimed at preventing or limiting the amount of damage disasters cause when they happen. Actions undertaken by various City departments include, but are not limited to: flood drainage improvements, conversion from overhead to underground utility lines, removal of structures located in floodplains, and review and modification of zoning and building codes. These actions help College Station become more resilient to disasters and alleviate potential damages. • Preparedness is the effort of being ready for disasters when they strike. The Emergency Management team works with every City department to plan out disaster response, maintaining emergency operating guidelines that organize the City’s response during and after a disaster, and participating in larger area plans with other organizations in the Brazos County Interjurisdictional Emergency Management Association. Emergency Management also prepares and executes preparedness and training exercises each year. • Perhaps the most important actions of Emergency Management are those that occur during and immediately after a disaster. Emergency Management organizes first responders, City departments, volunteers, and response organizations within the City and makes calls to surrounding localities if additional response is needed. The Brazos Community Emergency Operations Center (CEOC) houses all local jurisdictions to provide for better communication and coordination of response actions by each jurisdiction, especially in the case of a larger disaster, Emergency Management also organizes public information releases to coordinate outreach efforts to citizens. • While disasters can last from moments to days, recovery almost always takes longer. Emergency Management’s recovery actions aim to shorten those timelines so the City and its residents can return to pre-disaster conditions or better. The department works to prioritize restoration of vital facilities and services and coordinate recovery actions being taken by area government entities and nonprofit organizations. FACILITIES The Emergency Management Division works out of the Brazos CEOC in Bryan in collaboration with representatives from Brazos County, the City of Bryan, and Texas A&M University. This model of co-located jurisdictions has proved beneficial to foster relationships and coordination in emergency response. Page 201 of 310 108CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE NEEDS The nature of threats affecting the city are changing. In 2020, the city, nation, and the world were dealt an unexpected global pandemic that disrupted operations and posed entirely new challenges. The pandemic highlighted the need for increased mobility and remote work options for many within the city’s workforce. In early 2021, Texas faced a historic winter storm that left thousands of residents without power or heat and posed significant challenges to electric grids and water operations across the state. With the changing climate projected to produce increasingly frequent and extreme weather events, proactive emergency management efforts must rise to the challenges. Other challenges evolving almost daily are cybersecurity threats, which require coordination and support across city departments as well as the personal responsibility of each city employee. To proactively anticipate, mitigate, plan for, respond to, and recover from the changing nature of emergencies, the Emergency Management Division will need continued and expanded support to accomplish its goals. Emergency Management has identified the need for a city-wide continuity operations plan, which would detail how individual departments and the entire City of College Station will continue operations during various types of disasters. The department is also working with the other local jurisdictional, agency, and regional emergency management coordinators to maintain and enhance a robust roster of regional response resources as well as recognizing the need to update both the Brazos County Interjurisdictional Mutual Aid Agreement and the Brazos Valley Regional Mutual Aid Agreement. Another need of the division is formalizing the post-disaster after-action report (AAR) process. AARs are a vital tool to help the City learn from past experiences, identify opportunities for increased efficiencies, and adjust standards to improve future responses to disasters. Learning from past experiences and taking corrective actions can help the City be more resilient and effective in leveraging its resources. There have been ad-hoc efforts to date to document successes and challenges, but a more formalized process is key for effective organizational learning. The Emergency Management Division needs to staff a grant manager dedicated to researching, applying for, and administering public safety grant funds that aid city emergency management operations and help ensure the City is not leaving money on the table. A gap currently exists in the city’s ability to apply for and leverage funds for hazard mitigation and emergency management due to staffing capacity and grant-writing and grant management expertise. Page 202 of 310 109CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Electric – College Station Utilities SERVICES College Station Utilities (CSU) is the primary electric provider in College Station, serving more than 44,000 customers. The electric certification area for CSU has been set by the Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT) as the area inside the City limits as of 2002, therefore, Bryan Texas Utilities (BTU) services the areas incorporated into the City after 2002. Even though CSU’s service territory is fixed, the electric utility has not yet reached “build out” of its service territory and expects additional development and redevelopment to continue to add load to the utility’s facilities. CSU is a wholesale power purchaser and does not have electric generation facilities. Power is purchased from wholesale contracts with American Electric Power Energy Partners (AEPEP) and Garland Power and Light. Delivery of this power is from the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) transmission grid. CSU provides electric power to its consumers at various desired voltages; responds to trouble calls and outage reports; provides new construction and maintenance of transmission and distribution electric system; engineers and designs the electric system; and provides street and thoroughfare lighting. CSU also provides Energy Programs such as “Connected Thermostats,” energy audits, “Good Cents” home builder programs, high efficiency air conditioner rebates, the “Wind Watts” program and customer energy education. FACILITIES There are eight electrical substations located in College Station with a capacity of 533 MVA (Mega Volt Amperes). The current peak demand for College Station is around 218 MW (Megawatts), which means CSU is well situated to serve any future additional load. One additional electrical substation will be required to meet the anticipated build out demand for the service territory. CSU owns and operates approximately 20 miles of 138 kV (kilo Volt) transmission lines. The electric distribution system consists of about 518 miles of distribution power lines, with approximately 39% of those being overhead and 61% being underground. The City adopted a policy in 1992 to require that new electric lines be installed underground (with a few exceptions for feeder lines). Since that time, the City has removed or relocated overhead electric lines on portions of major corridors including University Drive, Texas Avenue, Southwest Parkway, and Harvey Road. FUTURE NEEDS CSU currently maintains an Electric Utility Master Plan that is updated as areas develop or redevelop to ensure adequate and reliable service is maintained to the system. Each year, a new system model is built in the modelling program to simulate the conditions at system peak and the loading on the electric facilities. The loads are uprated for growth and projected loads are added for proposed known projects. Using this information, the model identifies any additions or upgrades that need to be made to the electric system. The master plan also has identified the need for an additional substation to meet the future loading and reliability needs within the CSU service territory. Page 203 of 310 110CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Water Services – College Station Utilities SERVICES College Station Water Services is the primary water provider in College Station and is responsible for providing safe drinking water, irrigation water supplies, and water for fire protection services for over 40,000 customers within its certificated area. The water system is rated Superior by the State of Texas and has received awards for outstanding operations and maintenance from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. FACILITIES The City’s water system consists of water production, treatment, and distribution. Water is provided from eight deep wells in the Simsboro Formation of the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer group and one well in each of the Carrizo and Sparta aquifers. Water is treated at pump stations that supply water to the City’s distribution system and elevated storage tanks. FUTURE NEEDS The City’s certificated area for water is not expected to expand into the Extraterritorial Jurisdiction since these areas are already served by various special utility districts or water supply corporations. Water Services maintains a Water Utility Master Plan that is updated on a routine cycle to ensure adequate and reliable service is maintained to the system customers. The master plan identifies future improvements needed to meet the anticipated build-out demands from future infill growth. The City will continue to evaluate future water demands and identify required improvements. Wastewater Services – College Station Utilities SERVICES College Station Water Services is the primary wastewater service provider in College Station and is responsible for the collection and treatment of domestic and commercial sewage from over 43,000 customers within its certificated area. The City treats collected wastewater to meet the requirements of the regulating agencies. FACILITIES The City’s wastewater system consists of wastewater collection and treatment. The collection system relies on gravity mains to convey wastewater to treatment facilities and when that is not enough, lift stations are used. The City’s three wastewater treatment plants process the collected sewage into wastewater effluent that meets the requirements of regulating agencies. Page 204 of 310 111CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE NEEDS In 2019, the Texas Legislature limited cities’ ability to annex territory. Due to this, the City does not plan to extend sewer service to properties outside of the existing certificated area boundaries or further into the Extraterritorial Jurisdiction. The City may rely on strategic partnership agreements and municipal utility districts for service provision outside of the City’s service area. These agreements will need to balance the impact of cost of service with the benefits of serving additional customers. College Station currently has two Strategic Partnership Agreements—one for Brazos County Municipal Utility District No. 1 (Southern Pointe), and one for Brazos County MUD No. 2 (Millican Reserve). Both agreements define how the City may annex these territories in the future when they are substantially developed and infrastructure costs have been reimbursed to the developers. In the case of Millican Reserve, the agreement also details how the City may annex for limited purpose. Strategic partnerships with utility and development agreements will likely remain a viable annexation option for College Station, with evaluation and negotiations to be made on a case-by-case basis. Water Services maintains a Wastewater Utility Master Plan that is updated on a routine cycle to ensure adequate and reliable service is maintained to system customers. The master plan identifies future improvements needed to meet the anticipated build-out demands from future growth, infill, and redevelopment. The City will continue to evaluate future wastewater demands and identify required improvements. Page 205 of 310 112CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Solid Waste & Recycling - College Station Public Works SERVICES College Station provides various services to meet the local need for the collection of municipal solid waste including weekly residential collection, bulky item pickup, and brush/yard clippings pickup. The City contracts bi-weekly curbside recycling pick-up for single-family residential dwellings. The Solid Waste & Recycling Division is also responsible for the collection and disposal of commercial solid waste, as well as street sweeping operations. Construction and demolition wastes are collected by private haulers regulated through franchise agreements incentivizing haulers to recycle collected materials to lower franchise fees. The City currently serves over 27,000 single-family residential customers. The City serves a large multi- family customer service base of 11,000 units. Multi-family and commercial services consist of four routes, six days per week. The City’s solid waste collection vehicle fleet has a five to 10-year replacement schedule for each vehicle. Regular maintenance, replacements, and additions will be paramount to ensure core services and operations meet projected needs. As the City continues to grow, solid waste collections will need to be monitored closely to meet demand through exceptional and efficient services. The City is committed to environmental stewardship and waste reduction through recycling, education, and outreach. The recycling program and clean green activities are designed to help reduce the amount of solid waste deposited into the landfill. In 2020, College Station reduced the amount of waste going to the landfill by 27% (24,947 tons) through curbside and commercial recycling, as well as clean green brush collection. The City proactively controls litter along public right-of-way through the Adopt-A-Street Program. The program partners with community volunteer groups performing quarterly clean-ups along assigned street segments. FACILITIES The City of College Station partnered with the City of Bryan in 1990 to create the Brazos Valley Solid Waste Management Agency (BVSWMA) which manages the Twin Oaks Landfill, a Subtitle D landfill, which became operable in 2010. The City’s previous landfill, the Rock Prairie Road Landfill, closed in 2011 after reaching its capacity. The Twin Oaks Landfill facility is located off State Highway 30 in Grimes County and has an air space capacity of roughly 33 million tons of waste, with an expected life of 37 years. The landfill accepts more than 1,400 tons of solid waste per day, primarily from the seven-county region including Brazos, Burleson, Grimes, Leon, Madison, Washington, and Robertson Counties, and Texas A&M University. Since the landfill is the only Type 1 facility between Austin and Houston, it accepts solid waste from 19 counties. FUTURE NEEDS Increased manpower and additional equipment will be necessary within the planning horizon to meet development demand placed on solid waste services. The use of new technologies is essential to increase operational efficiency and exceptional service. Page 206 of 310 113CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Street, Traffic System & Drainage Maintenance – College Station Public Works SERVICES Street and drainage infrastructure facilitate transportation and ensure the health and safety of residents and visitors. These facilities are costly and demand significant attention to protect the investment and value they bring to the City. The Streets and Drainage Division maintains more than 350 miles of paved streets, 230 miles of sidewalks, 100 miles of storm drain lines, 470 miles of concrete valley gutters, 130 miles of natural creek area, and mows and trims over 1,300 acres of grass. Traffic Operations’ mission is to guide, warn, and regulate motorists, pedestrians, and bicyclists in a safe and efficient manner. The division currently maintains over 90 traffic signals and 85 traffic warning flashers, over 200 linear miles of pavement markings, and more than 15,000 traffic signs. FUTURE NEEDS As the City continues to grow the need for new streets, street maintenance, traffic system maintenance, and drainage maintenance will continue. Aging infrastructure generally requires more maintenance and new development and growth creates new demands for infrastructure maintenance. Recent multi-modal transportation initiatives place higher expectations for infrastructure rehabilitation that appropriately accommodates more modes of transportation, particularly in dense areas within the City’s core. These improvements, such as adding bicycle lanes or shared-use paths, help generate more walking, bicycling, and alternative options for citizens to navigate throughout the City while also helping to alleviate some of the demand and congestion on the roadway network. Additionally, the City’s corridors must be maintained as streets are rehabilitated to create a sense of place and attractive community. These service demands will require additional staff and resources to maintain and preserve the City’s transportation capital investments. Page 207 of 310 114CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Planning & Development Services SERVICES Planning & Development Services is responsible for aiding the community in making the best possible decisions regarding the physical development of the City. This occurs through long range and comprehensive planning that engages citizens to envision the City’s future and implements practical steps and policies to create a community with a strong sense of place and positive quality of life. The City is responsible for ensuring that all new development, infill and redevelopment, site work, and construction comply with the Comprehensive Plan, the Unified Development Ordinance, and all other adopted codes and standards. Departmental services include land use and comprehensive planning, multi-modal transportation planning, zoning, development review, engineering, floodplain and stormwater management, greenways management, building plan review, and building and site inspections. Additional service level information can be found in the department’s strategic plan. FUTURE NEEDS As the City continues to develop and redevelop, the need for planning and development services will increase. New development, infill, and redevelopment within the community places demand on development review processes, building construction review, and inspections to coordinate and ensure private infrastructure meets City standards and contributes positively to the character of the community. Development planning remains vital in ensuring adequate densities, complimentary land uses, and the provision of infrastructure that balances service delivery costs to ensure the financial stability of the City. Due to limitations to annexation, the City anticipates minimal outward growth and the emphasis on infill and redevelopment will become increasingly important. The City must encourage infill and redevelopment in strategic locations that are sensitive to the existing context and character of each area. Established residential areas may benefit from continued neighborhood planning efforts due to potential neighborhood integrity issues that arise as areas fill in and redevelop adjacent to existing neighborhoods. Development conflicts and neighborhood integrity issues necessitate collaboration between Planning & Development Services and departments throughout the City, and Planning & Development Services will continue to seek out these partnerships and collaborations to build upon successes, identify areas for improvement, and contribute positively to College Station’s identity and quality of life. Page 208 of 310 115CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Community Services SERVICES Community Services delivers high-quality programs, services, and facilities to enrich the lives of individuals and families within the City. The City encourages the expansion and accessibility of health and human services, expansion and improvement of public facilities and infrastructure, and expansion of economic opportunities for low - and moderate - income residents. Additional goals include providing for an adequate supply of safe and affordable housing, rehabilitation of rental and owner-occupied residential property, and expanding home ownership opportunities. The Community Services department consists of Community Development, Code Enforcement, and Northgate District Management. The City receives funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) through the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and the HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME) grant. Community Services administers these grant funds through programs designed in accordance with the department’s goals, federal regulations, and input from citizens and the City Council. The programs aided by federal grant funding are available to individuals, families, and areas where household income does not exceed 80% of the area median income limits set by HUD. Page 209 of 310 116CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS HOME funds are used to expand the supply of safe and affordable housing. Assistance for security deposit payments through the Tenant Based Rental Assistance program, which is managed by Twin City Mission on behalf of the City, averages approximately $300 per household moving into a housing tax credit property located in College Station. Up to $14,999 in down payment and closing cost assistance is provided to qualified, income-eligible homebuyers. Reconstruction assistance of up to $85,000 and rehabilitation assistance of up to $35,000 is available through low - or no - interest loans to qualified, income-eligible homeowners. Minor repair assistance in the form of a grant of up to $3,000 is available to correct health and safety issues. Finally, HOME funds are used to construct new affordable housing either through City- developed activities or through the support of a Community Housing Development Organization, Habitat for Humanity, or private developers leveraging other sources of funds. The City’s CDBG monies are used to provide funding to various non-profit agencies that provide health and human service programs throughout the community. These funds also support code enforcement activities in low - to moderate - income areas, acquisition of land for future development, and demolition of substandard housing. CDBG funds can be used to finance public facility activities in low- to moderate- income areas. These activities can include park development or enhancement, improvement or expansion of infrastructure, or improvements to other public facilities such as recent improvements to the Lincoln Center. Other resources will be sought for specific project needs. Funds can be accessed through the HUD Section 108 Loan Program or from the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs for larger new construction or rehabilitation projects. As other federal or state resources are made available, various programs will be developed to meet the needs of the residents. The Community Services Department also provides Code Enforcement for both commercial and residential properties within the City to ensure continued compliance with City standards, as well as providing services to established neighborhoods. Code Enforcement investigates violations to parking, sanitation, health and safety, illegal dumping, livestock, zoning, fire, and tall weeds and grass codes to maintain the City’s character and quality of life. Aging areas of the City generally require more property maintenance code enforcement. Several initiatives, including the Rental and Short-Term Rental Registration programs and small area planning efforts, will be utilized to focus future staff and funding efforts. Community Services also manages the Northgate District. A vibrant entertainment district across from Texas A&M University, Northgate is an eclectic mix of restaurants, shops, bars, religious centers, and residential areas. The Northgate District Management Division oversees late-night operations, pedestrian safety, and parking planning and operations including within the College Main Parking Garage. In 2020, the City developed a Mobility Study and Operations Plan for the Northgate District that recommends improvements within the district. FUTURE NEEDS The City will utilize the required planning guidelines for federal grants to collect information regarding community needs and conditions. These include the Consolidated Plan and Annual Action Plan. Adjustments to programs will be made when new needs or changes are identified so that staff and federal grant resources can be utilized in the most effective ways. Page 210 of 310 117CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Neighborhood Services SERVICES Neighborhood Services focuses on maintaining collaborative partnerships between neighborhoods, community services, and the City. The department undertakes educational and outreach programming, as well as connects neighborhoods to City resources. Through the Neighborhood Partnership Program, the City promotes the development of neighborhood and homeowner associations and maintains regular contact with those associations. There are 85 associations currently registered with the City. The department also manages the City’s Strong and Sustainable Neighborhood Grant Program, which provides financial support for projects within neighborhoods. This umbrella program consists of both the Neighborhood Grant Program and the Gateway Grant Program that support beautification projects such as a gateway or identification signage, landscape improvements, and small-scale community-building projects. These matching grant programs foster a mutually beneficial partnership between neighborhoods and the City. Library Services SERVICES In 1986, the cities of Bryan and College Station signed an interlocal agreement for Bryan to operate a branch library in College Station. College Station’s first public library opened in 1987, and the present location opened in 1998. Together with the Carnegie History Center, the Bryan+College Station Public Library System was created, providing library services free of charge to all Brazos County residents. Library Services provides programs for all ages including storytimes, book clubs, outreach with community partners, adult and child crafts, an English Conversation Circle, a Teen Advisory Board, an annual Summer Reading Program, and volunteer programs. FACILITIES The College Station Public Library was renamed to Larry J. Ringer Library in 2004 to honor the former College Station mayor who was active in establishing the library in the City. Due to its expansive use and increase in visits and circulation, a bond was passed in 2008 to expand the library and construction began in 2018. After renovations and expansion, the library reopened in September 2019. The Larry J. Ringer Library provides many services to the public including reference and readers advisory, physical materials circulation, digital materials circulation, device access troubleshooting, internet computers, printing/copying, tech tutorials, and themed displays. There are public spaces available for reservation including one large meeting/ program room, two conference rooms, and five private study rooms. FUTURE NEEDS The Larry J. Ringer Library nearly doubled in size from the expansion and renovation project and is well suited to meet future needs. Increases in collections budgets and personnel will be needed to support a growing population. Page 211 of 310 118CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Fiber Optic Network SERVICES The City’s fiber optic network includes approximately 80 miles of cable that is owned and maintained by the City. Virtually all the City’s major communication systems including the telephone and computer networks, 800 MHz Trunk Radio Service, Utility Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition systems, Traffic Signals, and Wireless Networks depend on the fiber optic network service to function fully. As part of the Fiber Optic Loop Project, a fiber optic ring connecting all major City facilities was completed in 1999. Since that time, various cable spurs off the main ring and individual cable segments have been installed to add existing smaller sites, traffic signals, and new facilities as they have been built. Fiber optic network upgrades are incorporated into the five-year Capital Improvement Program to provide continued expansion and improvement to the network. Several ultra-high-speed internet options are available in College Station, offering communications services that are vital to future growth. Ultra-high-speed internet provides download speeds of up to one gigabit per second (or 1,000 megabits) and has a positive impact on local economic development and enhancing the community’s quality of life. Providers such as Suddenlink, and newcomers such as Frontier and MetroNet, provide ultra-high-speed internet connections which aid commercial users in enhancing their productivity and efficiency. College Station also leases unused or “dark” City-owned fiber optic cable to offer additional ultra-high-speed internet options. FACILITIES There are approximately 40 discrete City buildings with fixed cabling infrastructure that support telephone, network, cable television, intercom, and two-way radio communications. This infrastructure is comprised of fiber optic cabling, copper network and phone cabling, and coaxial radio frequency cabling, with supporting equipment including racks, termination panels, cable management, power, and grounding. FUTURE NEEDS Currently, the City’s fiber optic infrastructure extends south to the State Highway 6 and William D. Fitch (SH 40) Parkway area and east to Lick Creek Park. Future fiber projects include a planned fiber route along William D. Fitch (SH 40) west to Wellborn Road (FM 2154) to complete the loop in the southern part of the City, increasing of the fiber count on the main city fiber ring and extending the fiber ring further out along Harvey Mitchell Parkway (FM 2818). As the City continues to develop southward, additional fiber optic infrastructure will be needed to support the development of essential public facilities, such as additional fire stations and public schools. The presence of fiber optic infrastructure is essential in the location of future City facilities. The fiber network also serves to connect and provide backhaul for a planned implementation of wireless hot zones in various locations. There is also need for fiber to support video surveillance in select locations to serve as a force multiplier for public safety. The City will continue collaborating with private internet providers to encourage growth of the fiber network and access to ultra-high-speed internet options for all College Station citizens. Page 212 of 310 119CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN General Municipal Administration SERVICES In addition to the various services previously discussed in this chapter, the City of College Station also provides the following external and internal services: City Internal Auditor, Legal, City Management, City Secretary, Fiscal Services, Human Resources, Information Technology, Municipal Court, Budget and Strategic Planning, Public Communications, Public Works, and Utility Customer Service. The City has a total of 995 full-time equivalent positions funded in the Fiscal Year 2021 budget. FACILITIES The City owns and maintains several capital facilities and buildings required to perform the necessary administrative functions of the City. These are illustrated in Map 7.1 Public Facilities, and include: • City Hall – 1101 Texas Avenue • Economic Development & Tourism – 1207 Texas Avenue (as of 2022) • Police Station – 800 Krenek Tap Road • Parks Administration building – 1000 Krenek Tap Road • Public Works buildings and storage yard – 300 Krenek Tap Road • Municipal Court – 300 Krenek Tap Road • Utility Customer Service – 310 Krenek Tap Road • College Station Utilities – 1601 Graham Road • Larry J. Ringer Library – 1818 Harvey Mitchell Parkway • Lincoln Recreation Center – 1000 Eleanor Street • Park facilities throughout the City including pavilions, park shelters, playing fields and courts, restrooms, concessions, playground equipment, pools • Cemeteries and Cemetery shop – Texas Avenue, Raymond Stotzer Parkway • Northgate Parking Garage – 209 College Main • Northgate Surface Metered Parking – Church Street • Northgate Promenade – Church Street • Second Street Promenade in Northgate – Second Street • Wolf Pen Creek Amphitheater and Greenroom – Holleman Drive/Colgate Drive • Three Park Maintenance / Forestry Shops – Krenek Tap Road, Holleman Drive, Rock Prairie Road • Carter Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant • Lick Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant • Three elevated water towers (as of 2022) • Eight electrical substations • Six fire stations – Holleman Drive (Fire Station No. 1), Rio Grande Boulevard (Fire Station No. 2), Barron Road (Fire Station No. 3), at Easterwood Airport (Fire Station No. 4 – owned by Texas A&M University System), William D. Fitch Parkway (Fire Station No. 5), and University Drive (Fire Station No. 6) Page 213 of 310 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 13 PARKS CEMETERIES CITY FACILITY BUILDINGS K-12 EDUCATION TAMU PROPERTY CITY LIMITS 1 NORTHGATE PA RKING GARAGE 2 FIRE STATION #6 5 CITY HALL 6 LINCOLN RECREATION CENTER 7 FIRE STATION #1 8 MEYER SENIOR & COMMUNITY CENTER 9 MUNICIPAL COURT 10 UTILIT Y CUSTOMER SERVICE 11 POLICE STATION 12 PA RKS & RECREATION 13 CARTER CREEK WW TP 14 LARRY J. RINGER LIBRARY 15 FIRE STATION #2 16 COLLEGE STATION UTILITIES & MEETING & TRAINING FA CILITY 17 FIRE STATION #3 19 FIRE STATION #5 20 LICK CREEK WW TP 4 VISITOR’S CENTER, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & TOURISM** 3 FIRE STATION #4* 18 ARTS CENTER*** FIRE STATION #4 IS OWNED BY TE XAS A&M UNIVERSITY SYSTEM * THE VISITOR’S CENTER, ECONOMIC DE VELOPMENT & TOURISM BUILDING WILL OPEN IN 2022 ** THE ARTS CENTER IS OWNED BY THE ARTS COUNCIL OF BRAZOS VA LLEY *** Public Facilities M AP 7.1 UNIVERSITY DRGEORGE BUSH DRTE X A S A V E SHARVEY RDHOLLEMAN DRSOUTHWEST PKWY FM 2818DEACONDRROCK PRAIRIE RD GRAHAM RDEAGLE AVEBARRON RDGREENS PRAIRIE RDWILLIAM D. FITCH PKWYF M 2 1 5 4 S H 6 S S H 6 S MI D T O W N D R Page 214 of 310 121CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE NEEDS As College Station’s population continues to grow to the projected 162,500 by 2030, additional City employees will be needed to continue providing exceptional services and maintain appropriate personnel- to-population ratios. College Station’s previous City Hall was constructed in 1969 and expanded in 1979 and again in 1983. In response to College Station’s substantial population growth throughout the years, various City facilities have been constructed across the City to accommodate the growing number of employees needed to provide and maintain services. The decentralization of City facilities and its workforce has resulted in inefficiencies such as time and resource losses from travel between facilities and hampered communication between divisions and departments. As the number of employees has continued to grow to respond to the service level needs of a growing population, and as public participation in College Station has increased, it became clear that the City had outgrown its City Hall. The City Council approved funding for a new City Hall in early 2018, located adjacent to the previous City Hall and directly across from Texas A&M University. The new site broke ground and construction began in March 2020. The new City Hall is over 79,000 square feet and houses more than 200 employees with room for growth, allowing multiple departments who were previously decentralized to unite, consolidate resources, and increase efficiencies. The site also serves as a community gathering place and contains public meeting spaces and an outdoor plaza. Once renovations of the adjacent 1207 Texas Avenue location are also completed (expected in 2022), this space will serve as a new Visitor’s Center to welcome citizens, visitors, and students to our community and provide an additional community event space that opens to the City Hall plaza. These new facilities will allow the City to continue providing exceptional services to meet the needs of College Station citizens into the future. Page 215 of 310 122CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Strategic & Ongoing Actions The actions listed below are aimed at implementing the goal of exceptional municipal facilities and services that meet community needs, contribute to community character, exhibit environmental stewardship and resiliency, support surrounding land uses, incorporates full life-cycle costs, and are coordinated and fiscally responsible. The actions include new, strategic items as well as ongoing efforts undertaken by the City. STRATEGIC ACTIONS 7.1 Prioritize utility and service improvements in existing areas. Invest in infrastructure rehabilitation within the City’s older areas to maintain their viability and attractiveness and encourage infill and redevelopment where appropriate. 7.2 Develop a comprehensive facilities plan. The plan should meet the future space and functional needs of City employees, services, and the community. 7.3 Continue capitalizing on opportunities to achieve multiple community objectives through coordinated infrastructure projects. Incorporate a measure in the Capital Improvements Program to weigh projects that achieve multiple objectives. Examples of coordinated infrastructure projects include road improvements, utility and drainage upgrades, sidewalk rehabilitation / installation / extensions, and streetscape enhancement. 7.4 Continue to build resiliency in municipal operations and services. Ensure operations and services are resilient and adaptable to unforeseen circumstances, such as disaster or pandemic, and able to continuously meet community needs. Consider updating provisions in city plans and policies and develop incentive programs to better prepare for and adapt to abrupt changes or strained circumstances while simultaneously allowing for action in the face of uncertainty or unforeseen events. 7.5 Evaluate the utilization of community paramedicine. Partner with regional health care providers and social services to evaluate community paramedicine. This is an emerging field that uses a comprehensive approach and integrated deployment model to connect underserved populations to underutilized medical, social, and safety services, helping to decrease strain on emergency rooms, hospitals, and first responders such as EMS, fire, and police. ONGOING ACTIONS AND POLICY DIRECTION 7.6 Continue to pursue recognition, credentials, and accreditations City-wide. Continue to obtain national recognition for outstanding and innovative service in police, fire, emergency medical services (EMS), public safety communications, parks, water, public works, planning, and other areas. 7.7 Continue to sustain and grow emergency management preparedness. In coordination with Brazos Community Emergency Operations Center and other regional partners, sustain and enhance emergency management efforts, partnerships, and funding levels to provide adequate resources, planning efforts, educational training, and appropriate technology to proactively plan for, respond to, and recover from emergency situations and disasters. 7.8 Continue using business intelligence, data analytics, and data visualization tools. Utilize data and business intelligence solutions to inform policy decisions and provide efficient municipal services. Page 216 of 310 123CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 7.9 Continue to expand wi-fi to public buildings. Expand existing public wi-fi services to additional facilities and consider partnership opportunities to establish a city-wide wi-fi network. 7.10 Update public service plans. Continue to re-evaluate and update key public service master plans (water, wastewater, stormwater, drainage management, solid waste, electric, police, fire, EMS) on regular cycles or when necessary based on changing conditions. Ensure that these plans reflect long-term growth forecasts and support priority growth areas. 7.11 Utilize municipal service cost-benefit assessments in planning utility expansion. The City should focus on areas that can be reliably and economically served within the City’s capabilities. Consider an analysis of cost versus benefit when evaluating potential development agreements, municipal utility districts (MUDs) or annexation petitions. 7.12 Evaluate ways to reduce energy consumption. Implement energy and resource conservation strategies in City facilities and all areas of municipal service provision. 7.13 Pursue and support local water conservation and reuse initiatives. Utilize reclaimed and/or nonpotable water to irrigate City facilities where feasible. 7.14 Continue outreach and educational programs to reduce resource consumption. Encourage residents, businesses, and local institutions to participate in solid waste reduction and recycling, energy efficiency, and water conservation programs. Create publicity campaigns to highlight the City’s sustainability and resiliency efforts within public facilities. 7.15 Continue to implement best practices in meeting or exceeding State and Federal standards for stormwater management. Implement the City’s Stormwater Management Program (SWMP) in accordance with State requirements of the TPDES Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems (MS4) program to manage stormwater discharges to protect, preserve and improve area streams and waterways. Consider updates to better protect area creeks and bodies of water from the impacts of urban runoff. 7.16 Advance sound floodplain management practices. Reduce the risk and impacts of flooding, adhere to higher development standards, and limit long-term infrastructure costs through continued implementation and refinement of the City’s Flood Ordinance (including No Adverse Impacts) and participation in FEMA’s Community Rating System (CRS) program. 7.17 Continue to meet or exceed State and Federal water quality standards for drinking water sources. Continue phased expansion of water supply resources and associated production capabilities to meet shorter-term peak demands, as well as forecasted longer-term needs. 7.18 Continue to keep wastewater collection and treatment capacities ahead of demand. Continue phased expansion of the existing wastewater system to comply with all regulatory permits, standards, and requirements that meet shorter-term peak demands, as well as forecasted longer-term needs. 7.19 Continue coordinated electric planning along with area partners. Ensure adequate and reliable supply to serve anticipated growth and maintain College Station Utilities’ capability for rapid response to system outages. Page 217 of 310 124CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 7.20 Design high-quality public facilities that reflect the character of their surroundings. Ensure these buildings, facilities and improvements blend into existing areas and help establish an identity and quality standard for newly developing or redeveloping areas of the City. 7.21 Design City facilities and infrastructure to incorporate sustainable and resilient practices. Consider design features such as stormwater management, water conservation and reuse, native or adapted plantings, or building design features that conserve energy and natural resources. 7.22 Provide public safety facilities to maintain adequate service and response times. Monitor response times and safety service needs as growth occurs; use data and national standards to make decisions about service investments. Page 218 of 310 OCTOBER 14, 2021 As College Station continues to develop it will face opportunities and challenges associated with managing growth. Since the adoption of the 2009 Comprehensive Plan, the City’s population surpassed 100,000 people in January 2014. The milestone allowed the City to extend its Extraterritorial Jurisdiction (ETJ) to five miles beyond City limits and this change was made in July 2018. This resulted in further ETJ expansion into Brazos, Burleson, and Grimes counties. Due to annexation law limitations enacted by the Texas legislature in 2019, the City anticipates minimal outward growth of the city limits in future years. A renewed emphasis on infill and redevelopment opportunities will be increasingly important as the City absorbs and manages continued population growth and becomes denser in appropriate areas. 8 MANAGED GROWTH Page 219 of 310 126CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Goal Fiscally responsible and carefully managed development that is aligned with growth expectations and the ability to provide safe, timely, and efficient infrastructure and services. Purpose The purpose of this chapter is to establish the necessary policy guidance and associated strategic actions to enable the City of College Station to manage its ongoing physical growth and development in a sensible, predictable, and fiscally responsible manner. It highlights the need to encourage additional infill development, accommodate increased population in denser areas, pursue strategic development agreements or annexations, and manage growth in the ETJ. The preparation of this chapter involved examining College Station’s growth history, projected growth trends, and tools used to manage growth. The chapter outlines options the community should consider to ensure the benefits of growth are not offset by increased traffic congestion, loss of valued open space, or other impacts that adversely affect residents’ quality of life and the local business environment. Background Growth management is critical to the City’s long-term viability and involves managing infill and redevelopment opportunities along with limited outward growth. A municipality has a responsibility to its residents and tax payers to ensure a growth pattern that makes good financial sense, particularly in terms of the infrastructure investments needed to keep pace with growth. Effective growth management can prevent roads, utility infrastructure, and public facilities from becoming overloaded by a scale and intensity of development that cannot be served safely and effectively. It can also serve to promote sustainability principles by guiding growth and development to targeted infill areas, thereby maximizing the efficiency and effectiveness of the City’s infrastructure network. College Station faces major investments in water and wastewater infrastructure in coming years to keep pace with increased population and infill growth. Along with traffic and drainage challenges, this is but one example of the capacity considerations that must be anticipated to plan effectively for projected growth. This photo shows the construction of a new water tower near Highway 6 and Rock Prairie Road. Page 220 of 310 127CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN PAST GROWTH PATTERN Over the last eight decades, College Station has experienced rapid population growth. Since 1980, the average rate of growth per decade is approximately 34%. As the scale of the community increased, its growth rate naturally became more moderate (41% in the 1980s and 29% in the 1990s), although the additional population and development in each decade remained significant. The growth rate in the past two decades has remained strong, with 38% growth between the 2000 and 2010 Census, and 31% growth between the 2010 Census and the City’s projected population as of Census Day (April 1) 2020. The finalized 2020 Census results have not been released as of publication date of this 10-year plan update. Figure 8.1 Population since 1940 depicts population growth since the City’s founding.1 In 2009, this comprehensive plan forecasted a population of 134,000 by 2030. Based on current City projections, the population as of Census Day 2020 was already 123,306. Due to a faster pace of growth than originally projected, the City now anticipates a population of 162,500 by 2030 based on a 2.8% annual growth rate, as shown in Figure 8.2 Growth Rate Projections.2 Additional discussion of future projections can be found in the Future Land Use section of this chapter. Purpose of the Extraterritorial Jurisdiction (ETJ) As a Home Rule municipality (greater than 5,000 population and with its own City Charter), College Station has some authority over a larger unincorporated planning area, beyond its current city limits, that is known in Texas as the “Extraterritorial Jurisdiction,” or ETJ. In Chapter 42 of the TEXAS LOCAL GOVERNMENT CODE, the Texas Legislature declares it to be State policy that ETJs be created around cities so that municipal governments can “promote and protect the general health, safety, and welfare of persons residing in and adjacent to” the City limits. 196019501940 40,000 20,000 0 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020* 60,000 90,000 120,000 130,000 2 ,148 7 ,925 11,396 17 ,676 37 ,272 5 2,456 67 ,890 93 ,857 123,306Figure 8.1 - Population since 1940 *City of College Station projected population as of Census Day (April 1) 2020. 1City of College Station Planning & Development Services 2City of College Station Planning & Development Services Page 221 of 310 128CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN College Station’s increase in population and corresponding employment growth is a positive indicator of the City’s economic competitiveness and stability. While attracting and sustaining economic development is a primary goal, the community must also consider ways to maximize the fiscal benefits associated with additional development. The physical growth pattern of the City and the efficient provision of City services are key factors in this consideration. The rapid growth of Texas A&M University enrollment has continued to be a significant contributor to the City’s population growth. As displayed in Figure 8.3, Increasing Development Fragmentation, since the 1970s the form of development in and around College Station has become progressively scattered. This is partly due to the location of floodplains and other physical constraints. However, the trend of peripheral growth within the city limits and the surrounding ETJ is long-standing. Development began to scatter in the 1980s and has increasingly sprawled outward since. Continuation of this growth pattern will become increasingly problematic due to the challenges associated with providing cost efficient City services and infrastructure to expanding areas. 200,000 180,000 160,000 140,000 120,000 100,000 80,000 60,000 40,000 20,000 0 2000 2010 2020 2030 150,309 162,523 173,935 2.0%2.8%3.5%RECORDED GROWTH RATE Figure 8.2 - Growth Rate Projections These projections are based on the actual rate of growth from 1990-2020. Page 222 of 310 129CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN DECADE ANNEXED 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010-2020 DECADE ANNE XED 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010-2020 INFILLING 2001-2020 SPRAWLING 1981-2000 SPREADING 1961-19801938-1960 COMPACT Figure 8.3: Increasing Development Fragmentation Figure 8.4: Annexation History Since being incorporated in 1938, the City of College Station has actively annexed property into its city limits, as depicted in Figure 8.4, Annexation History. The City currently contains 51.2 square miles, as of the most recent annexation in 2019. Looking forward, the City anticipates minimal outward growth of the city limits in future years due to changes in annexation law made during the 86th session of the Texas Legislature in 2019. Page 223 of 310 130CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Planning Considerations GROWTH MANAGEMENT Growth management represents a key opportunity for College Station to influence the timing, pattern, and quality of development through a variety of tools at the disposal of Texas municipalities. There are also State-imposed limitations that restrict the City’s ability to guide growth in the ETJ, and urban type development at the City’s edge has been an ongoing challenge. There is the allure of country living in locations that are detached from other development – a real market factor that must be recognized and accommodated when identifying future growth areas. It is important to note that recent ETJ platting activity has prepared the way for substantial numbers of residential lots regardless of future actions to manage growth. The City does not have zoning or land use controls in the ETJ but does regulate the subdivision of land in tandem with Brazos County. The City’s Unified Development Ordinance requires a minimum one- acre lot size to allow for septic systems and prevent intense densities in the ETJ. Annexation Annexation is a tool for cities to extend land development regulations – particularly zoning – to manage growth and land use to implement the comprehensive plan. Subsequently, annexation also extends the City’s ETJ boundaries, enabling it to regulate the subdivision of land over a larger area. Annexation powers have routinely come under attack. After the 86th session of the Texas Legislature in 2019, cities lost the ability to unilaterally annex territory. House Bill 347 changed the way cities can annex, essentially requiring consent by the residents and/or property owners within the potential annexation area. Moving forward, cities may annex in four ways: 1) consent exempt annexation, 2) annexation on request of the landowner, 3) annexation by petition of an area with a population of less than 200, and 4) annexation of an area with a population of 200 or more by election and possibly petition. A few exceptions include areas with strategic partnerships such as Municipal Utility Districts (MUDs). Municipal Utility Districts (MUDs) The City adopted a Municipal Utility District (MUD) policy in January 2014 to establish What are Municipal Utility Districts (MUDs)? A Municipal Utility District (MUD) is a political subdivision authorized by the Texas Commission of Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to provide water, sewer, drainage, and/or other municipal services within its clearly defined boundaries. These political subdivisions are recognized as taxing entities by the State of Texas to raise funds within its boundaries to pay for the costs of providing the municipal services. How does a MUD work? The publicly elected Board of Directors manages and controls the affairs of the MUD subject to the continuing supervision of TCEQ. The Board establishes policies in the interest of its residents and utility customers. A MUD may adopt and enforce all necessary charges, fees, and taxes to provide district facilities and service. How is a MUD created? A majority of property owners in the proposed district petitions TCEQ to create a MUD. The TCEQ evaluates the petition, holds a public hearing, and grants or denies the petition. After approval, the TCEQ appoints five temporary members to the MUD Board of Directors, until an election is called to elect permanent Board members, to confirm the MUD’s creation, and to authorize bonds and taxing authority for bond repayment. Page 224 of 310 131CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN City Council authority over the creation, operation, and dissolution of MUDs within the city limits or its ETJ. MUDs can be a tool used in financing, constructing, and operating quality water, wastewater, and drainage facilities because they allow the developer and future property owners to absorb the costs and pay for them over time. MUDs help manage growth in the ETJ by allowing development to occur in a planned manner and providing a means to finance the needed infrastructure. MUDs typically include a development agreement with the City that outlines development standards that would not typically apply in the ETJ absent an agreement. College Station currently has two Strategic Partnership Agreements — one for Brazos County Municipal Utility District No. 1 (Southern Pointe), and one for Brazos County MUD No. 2 (Millican Reserve). Southern Pointe is projected to have nearly 2,000 single-family lots on 553 acres. Millican Reserve is projected to have approximately 1,900 single-family homes on 2,354 acres. Both agreements define how the City may annex these territories in the future when they are substantially developed and infrastructure costs have been reimbursed to the developers. In the case of Millican Reserve, the agreement also details how the City may annex for limited purpose. Strategic partnerships with utility and development agreements will likely remain a viable annexation option for College Station, with evaluation and negotiations to be made on a case-by-case basis. The importance of and use of strategic development agreements may increase in future years due to annexation limitations. SPRAWL & ITS IMPLICATIONS Sprawl is a spread-out or leap-frog development pattern which blurs the urban edge and intrudes, often in a haphazard way, upon the low intensity nature of the rural landscape. To the extent that some ETJ developments around College Station involve suburban and even urban intensities, the growth management challenge becomes even greater for the City. For ETJ residents who may choose a more remote living location compared to city living, the erosion of rural character from dense piecemeal development impacts their investment and day-to-day quality of life. Page 225 of 310 132CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN There are several reasons why growth has occurred on the fringes within College Station city limits and the ETJ, such as: • An attraction to the open, rural landscape often found at the City’s edges • Land is generally less expensive due to the absence of public infrastructure and improvements, which equates to cheaper development costs • Property in the ETJ is not subject to City ad valorem taxes; therefore, residents and businesses outside the city limits benefit from access to municipal facilities and services such as streets, parks, trails, libraries, and other community facilities, but do not share equitably in the tax burden associated with constructing and maintaining those facilities and services • General ease of greenfield development and approvals within the ETJ, particularly since many City development regulations do not apply including land use controls, density, the number and size of buildings, and building standards or permits • Availability of water from other providers (Wellborn Special Utility District and Wickson Creek Special Utility District), allowing development to access public water that meets TCEQ standards without requiring connection to the City’s utility system • Allowances and limitations within the City’s Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) related to sprawling development patterns, such as: • The R Rural zoning district allows a minimum lot size of two-acres and average lot size of three-acres, meaning that residences utilizing on-site sewer treatment systems are permitted; although this district is not actively used, its availability as a zoning option can contribute to development fragmentation • The UDO contains a relatively large number of use-based zoning districts, meaning a zone change is often necessary to respond to a shift in the market, which adds process, delays development, and can serve as a disincentive for development to occur within the City rather than the ETJ, where zoning does not apply • Limited incentives to encourage certain development types, such as allowing increased density in exchange for development clustering with the provision of open space to promote a rural development environment within the city limits rather than necessitating ETJ development to achieve this character type Implications of Sprawl While College Station’s growth pattern has created opportunities, without adequate foresight and preparation it may yield undesirable consequences, including: • Erosion of a defined community edge, thereby blurring boundaries and contributing to a loss of community identity and proliferation of uses extending well beyond the city limits • Degradation of environmental resources such as floodplains, wetlands, habitat, and vegetated areas due to cumulative impacts from urban stormwater runoff (increased drainage volumes and velocities) and non-point source pollution of area streams and watercourses Page 226 of 310 133CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN • Degradation of air quality from increased vehicular exhaust containing greenhouse gas pollutants that contribute to a changing climate, along with increased heat island effect due to increased infrastructure and development • Increased commuting times and congestion as residents travel relatively longer distances to reach work, schools, places of worship, shopping, services, recreation, and entertainment destinations • Premature shifts in traffic patterns, causing congestion and environmental impacts, as development occurs in an uncoordinated fashion before adequate mobility infrastructure is in place • Increased demands on public infrastructure (e.g., roads, water, and wastewater systems) and services (e.g., police and fire protection, parks, libraries, and schools), in some cases creating unsafe conditions • Inefficient provision of services, meaning a larger investment in infrastructure systems with fewer than the optimal number of connections/users to pay for them • The potential for disinvestment in older areas of the community as new development continues to occur on the periphery GROWTH CAPACITY This section provides an evaluation of the City’s future land use assumptions and municipal services in terms of their ability to accommodate the population growth expected within the next 10 years. It also discusses tools to manage growth at the City’s edge and within the ETJ. Future Land Use A discussion of growth management and capacity would be incomplete without an analysis of population projections and land uses programmed within the updated the Future Land Use & Character Map. The City has maintained an average annual growth rate around 2.8% for the last decade and 3.0% over the two- decade period from 2000 to 2020.3 This plan anticipates a population of approximately 162,500 by 2030. Texas A&M University’s increasing student enrollment continues to be a significant driver of this growth. The Future Land Use & Character Map identifies land uses capable of accommodating an ultimate build-out population of approximately 196,000 within the current city limits. Planning for land uses capable of accommodating a larger population than is currently projected for the City provides a margin of error and allows for market flexibility. Page 227 of 310 134CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Providing balanced land uses, housing options, mobility choices, infrastructure investments, and quality of life amenities will be critical to serving a growing and diversifying population. As a part of the 10-year update to this plan, staff from the Planning & Development Services and Water Services departments worked in tandem to ensure the updated land uses depicted in the Future Land Use & Character Map were incorporated into updated models for future water, wastewater, and transportation needs. These updated models were used to estimate needed infrastructure upgrades and the associated costs to the City necessitated by population increases and future development. It will be important to continue monitoring growth trends, including enrollment increases at Texas A&M University, to anticipate and plan for growth. The City should also evaluate and react to market conditions, and potentially find new ways to incentivize development, infill, and redevelopment in appropriate areas. Nationally, there is expected to be continued demand for walkable, integrated, mixed-use districts and the City should encourage infill and redevelopment opportunities to support this type of development. There are many existing underutilized areas where infill and redevelopment could create more viable and vibrant places. While some of these areas were defined in previous iterations of the Future Land Use & Character Map, redevelopment activity has been slower than expected. The 10-year update to this plan builds upon and further expands these priority areas for redevelopment opportunities. The pace of redevelopment is largely dependent on local economics and physical conditions, but City investments or policies can influence and incentivize redevelopment potential. The City must prioritize proactive infrastructure investments and programs in strategic redevelopment and infill areas to catalyze redevelopment activity, promote more efficient use of infrastructure, and support the City’s environmental resiliency goals. There are growth opportunities on the City’s edge, but also challenges with providing well-timed infrastructure improvements that support long-term financial wellbeing for the City. Also, it may be cost prohibitive to provide utility services in some areas, particularly on the City’s southwestern edges. The City must be strategic with its future investments in infrastructure, facilities, and services. With limited incentives for annexation in the City’s ETJ, it is more challenging for the City to expand its boundaries. The City will need to continue, and potentially increase, utilizing other growth management tools, such as development agreements and MUDs, to strategically manage growth pressures in the ETJ. Annexation and Development Agreement Priorities Following the acceptance of the 5-year Comprehensive Plan Evaluation and Appraisal Report in 2015, an Annexation Task Force was assembled to review the City’s annexation priorities. The Task Force, comprised of three City Council members and three Planning & Zoning Commissioners, met for several months to evaluate the City’s annexation strategies and priorities and provided recommendations. Considering the annexation changes by the Texas Legislature in 2019, the following Task Force recommendations remain relevant: • Should the State continue to limit the City’s authority to unilaterally annex property, pursue strategies to minimize the impacts of such action • Utilize non-annexation development agreements in a strategic manner to reserve undeveloped or underdeveloped areas for future growth • Evaluate the costs and benefits of annexing areas currently under non-annexation development agreements on a case-by-case basis as they expire • Closely coordinate the City’s ETJ extension with Brazos, Burleson, and Grimes counties. Maintain interlocal agreements to address plat review for overlapping ETJ areas as appropriate. Page 228 of 310 135CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN There are many important considerations in prioritizing potential areas for well-managed outward growth, whether through the now-limited annexation options or strategic development agreements. Displayed in Map 8.1 Priority Annexation Areas and the accompanying Table 8.1 Annexation Considerations are priority annexation or expansion areas within the College Station ETJ. The map is color-coded to indicate areas currently under non-annexation development agreements, priority areas for annexation consideration, and existing MUDs. Annexation can be initiated by any of the four ways allowed through current annexation law: 1) consent exempt annexation, 2) annexation on request of the landowner, 3) annexation by petition of an area with a population of less than 200, and 4) annexation of an area with a population of 200 or more by election and possibly petition. These priority annexation areas are also candidates for potential strategic development agreements such as MUDs. Prioritization considerations include: • Whether the area is contiguous to developed areas within the current city limits, which contributes to orderly growth progression – and may also involve compatibility concerns if unzoned ETJ development is out of character with nearby City areas • Whether City utilities have planned service extensions or expansions into the area or are within close proximity and could readily and feasibly be extended as demands warrant – whether the City prefers to be the service provider in particular areas experiencing development pressures • Whether the area is still largely vacant or has already developed at a rural or suburban intensity – or is destined for such development through prior platting and land planning activity (depending on market timing and ultimate owner/ developer intentions) • Whether any significant commercial development has already occurred – possibly in a haphazard, strip development fashion – which detracts from development quality and community appearance at gateway locations • Whether the area is constrained for significant development by floodplain or other factors, and whether there is much development potential beyond a current rural residential pattern • Whether current or future key transportation corridors traverse the area, making land use management along such corridors imperative to long-term transportation flow and safety • Whether other strategic considerations come into play in areas that might not otherwise be attractive for near term annexation, such as areas along major corridors that serve as current or future gateways into the City, protection areas for key assets (e.g., water supply, airport), or areas that may also be attractive to other jurisdictions for potential annexation Page 229 of 310 111 222 333 444 555 666 777 999101010 111111 121212 131313 141414 151515 161616 171717 181818 191919 202020 212121 232323 242424 252525 262626272727 282828 313131292929 303030 888 222222 MUDMUD #2#2 MUD #2 MUDMUD #1#1 MUD #1UNIVERSITY DRUNIVERSITY DRUNIVERSITY DRGEORGE BUSH DRGEORGE BUSH DRGEORGE BUSH DRTE X A S A V E TE X A S A V E SS TE X A S A V E S FFM 281M 28188FM 2818FF M 2 8 1 M 2 8 1 88 F M 2 8 1 8 ROCROCKKROCK PRAPRAPRAIRIEIRIEIRIE RDRDRD WWIILLLLIIAM AM DD. . FFIITTCH PKWCH PKWYYWILLIAM D. FITCH PKWYS H 6 S H 6 SS S H 6 S SH 6 SH 6 SS SH 6 S HARHARVVEY REY RDDHARVEY RDF M 2 1 5 4 F M 2 1 5 4 F M 2 1 5 4 FM 2154FM 2154FM 2154 S H 4 7 S H 4 7 S H 4 7 CSISD BOUNDARY CITY LIMITS 5 MILE ETJ Priority Annexation Areas NON-ANNEXATION AGREEMENTS PRIORITY ANNEXATION AREAS MUDS *NOTE: ANNE XATION AREAS ARE NOT INTENDED TO BE PARCEL SPECIFIC *NOTE: THIS MAP IS FOR PLANNING PURPOSES ONLY AND DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE MUNICIPAL ANNE XATION PLAN REQUIRED BY CHAPTER 43 OF THE TEXAS LOCAL GOVERNMENT CODE*NOTE: THIS MAP IS FOR PLANNING PURPOSES ONLY AND DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE MUNICIPAL ANNE XATION PLAN REQUIRED BY CHAPTER 43 OF THE TEXAS LOCAL GOVERNMENT CODE*NOTE: THIS MAP IS FOR PLANNING PURPOSES ONLY AND DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE MUNICIPAL ANNE XATION PLAN REQUIRED BY CHAPTER 43 OF THE TEXAS LOCAL GOVERNMENT CODE BRYA NBRYANBRYAN M AP 8.1 SH 30 Page 230 of 310 137CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN PRIORITY SUBAREA LABEL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Current Development Agreements 7 •••• 8 •••• 9 ••• 11 •• 19 •• 20 •• 21 •• 24 •• 25 •••• 26 •••• 27 •••• Priority Annexation Areas 1 ••• 2 •••• 3 •• 4 •••••• 5 •• • 6 ••••• 10 •• 12 •••• 13 •••• 16 •• 14 •••• •• 15 •••••• 17 •••••• 18 •••••• 22 • 23 •••• 28 •••• 29 •••• 30 ••• 31 •••• Table 8.1 - Annexation Considerations 1. Provides control of gateway frontage 2. Provides moderate to significant revenue (property and/or sales tax) 3. Provides undeveloped or underdeveloped area for future growth 4. Area adjacent to the City on two or more sides 5. Preserves existing character 6. Protects part (or all) of area from future development 7. Health and life safety concerns (building and fire code enforcement, emergency response, etc.) 8. Part of area currently served by City sanitary sewer with capacity to handle new development 9. Located within CSISD 10. Provides potential location for business parks 11. Transportation infrastructure already provided Page 231 of 310 138CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN EXTRATERRITORIAL JURISDICTION STRATEGIES There are many strategies for managing the pattern and timing of development in the ETJ, ranging from simply minimizing the impacts of growth without affecting the pattern to strictly controlling growth. Texas law does not provide cities with the means to entirely prevent sprawl, therefore, it is wise for the City to consider the ways in which it can exert more influence over the direction and timing of development that it ultimately may serve. Given College Station’s past development pattern and projected growth trends, the City’s growth management approach in the ETJ should focus on the following areas: • Use annexation or development agreements in a strategic fashion • Expand the City’s certificate of convenience and necessity as appropriate in concert with annexation or development agreement activity • Adhere to the City’s utility extension policy while working to enhance it • Effectively utilize the City’s Municipal Utility District policy • Coordinate future Thoroughfares in the ETJ with the Bryan-College Station Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) • Strengthen health and safety components of the subdivision regulations INFRASTRUCTURE NEEDS Water Basic water supply is a finite resource that requires sound stewardship to ensure its continued availability in support of a community’s growth and public health and welfare. College Station Water Services is the primary water provider in College Station and is responsible for providing safe drinking water, irrigation water supplies, and water for fire protection services for customers within its certificated area. Water Services maintains a Water Utility Master Plan that is updated on a routine cycle to ensure adequate and reliable service is maintained to the system customers. The master plan identifies future improvements needed to meet the anticipated build-out demands from future infill growth. Chapter 7: Exceptional Services and the Water Utility Master Plan further detail services, future needs, and strategic actions related to water services. Wastewater Wastewater collection and treatment is fundamental to protect the health, safety, and welfare of the public, as well as many different ecosystems. College Station Water Services is the primary wastewater service provider in College Station and is responsible for the collection and acceptable treatment of domestic and commercial sewage from customers within its certificated area. Water Services Page 232 of 310 139CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN maintains a Wastewater Utility Master Plan that is updated on a routine cycle to ensure adequate and reliable service is maintained to system customers. The master plan identifies the need for future improvements needed to meet the anticipated build-out demands from future infill growth. Chapter 7: Exceptional Services and the Wastewater Utility Master Plan further detail services, future needs, and strategic actions related to wastewater services. Electricity College Station Utilities (CSU) is the primary electric provider in College Station, serving more than 44,000 customers and providing street and thoroughfare lighting within its certificated area. CSU maintains an Electric Utility Master Plan that is updated as areas develop or redevelop to ensure adequate and reliable service is maintained to the system. The master plan identifies the need for one additional electrical substation to meet the anticipated build-out demand to meet future loading and reliability needs within the CSU service territory. Chapter 7: Exceptional Services and the Electric Utility Master Plan further detail services, future needs, and strategic actions related to electric service. Mobility Another challenge confronting College Station involves congestion and safety issues resulting from increased traffic on area roadways. Stresses on portions of the mobility system are already occurring at peak times and are likely to worsen overtime. This stress is due, in part, to the limitation of major corridors, existing and spread-out development patterns, and the traffic generated by the Texas A&M University campus. It is difficult for any community to build its way out of congestion problems. Investments must be made in alternative mobility options including transit, bicycle, and pedestrian infrastructure, along with additional capacity and intersection upgrades. One anticipated outcome of the 2020 Census is that the Bryan-College Station metropolitan area will reach a population over 200,000, at which point, the region will receive less Federal funding for transit service. As the financial burden for mobility improvements in Texas are increasingly falling on local communities, the City and its regional partners must plan accordingly to fund infrastructure improvements. The City’s physical development pattern has a significant impact on congestion and future mobility needs. The City can maximize the use of existing infrastructure by encouraging infill development in lieu of allowing future development to occur on the periphery. A more compact development pattern, with increased density and mixing of uses in appropriate locations, reduces the growth in total vehicle miles traveled by generating more walking, bicycling, and transit ridership and reducing the length of many routine trips. The City will continue to monitor and coordinate with TxDOT regarding future potential interstate projects I-14 and I-214. While the exact locations are unknown at this time, it is anticipated that I-14 may connect into SH 30 east of College Station and I-214 may loop the cities of Bryan and College Station. These future projects would provide regional connectivity to the interstate highway system and may also act as a catalyst for new development patterns on the east side of the City and into the ETJ. The City will continue to monitor these projects to anticipate development pressures once more is known. Page 233 of 310 140CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN While mobility issues will continue to be a challenge, carefully planned growth, a thoroughfare system incorporating multi-modal mobility, and smart use of limited financial resources should place the City in a position to accommodate the needs of the additional population anticipated during the life of this plan. Chapter 6: Integrated Mobility which contains the City’s Thoroughfare Plan, along with the Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan detail specific needs and strategic actions related to mobility. MUNICIPAL SERVICES Solid Waste The City of College Station partnered with the City of Bryan in 1990 to create the Brazos Valley Solid Waste Management Agency (BVSWMA), which manages the Twin Oaks Landfill — a Subtitle D landfill that became operable in 2010. The facility is located off State Highway 30 in Grimes County and has an air space capacity of roughly 33 million tons of waste, with an expected life of 37 years. The City is committed to environmental stewardship and waste reduction through recycling, education, and outreach. The recycling program and clean green activities are designed to help reduce the amount of solid waste deposited into the landfill. As the City grows, as will the need for programs promoting sustainability. Chapter 7: Exceptional Services further details services, future needs, and strategic actions related to solid waste and recycling. Page 234 of 310 141CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Police College Station Police Department operates out of a new station on the corner of Dartmouth Street and Krenek Tap Road that was constructed to allow for many years of growth. The nature of policing places response units in the field, therefore, the need for satellite offices due to projected growth is not likely. The department’s Community-Oriented Policing philosophy requires small, manageable beats to be formed and maintained where staff is held to a high level of geographical accountability for successful outcomes. Maintaining adequate staffing to fulfill these geographic demands is vital. As College Station continues to grow, the Police Department will need to continue monitoring growth trends and plan accordingly. It is anticipated that the Police Department will continue to add the necessary staff to serve the future population as projected by this plan. Chapter 7: Exceptional Services further details services, future needs, and strategic actions related to Police. Fire, Emergency Medical Services (EMS), and Emergency Management College Station Fire Department (CSFD) provides prevention, suppression, advanced life support emergency medical services (EMS) and transport, community risk reduction programs, health and fire safety education, emergency management, and special operations. CSFD currently operates six stations with plans underway for a seventh beginning construction in 2023. Current and short-term department needs are published in the annual city budget, including a schedule for additional personnel, equipment, and facilities. CSFD maintains a three- year strategic plan that ties into the City Council Strategic Plan. Overall, it is anticipated that the Fire Department will continue to add the necessary staff and facilities to serve the future population projected by this plan. Chapter 7: Exceptional Services further details services, future needs, and strategic actions related to Fire, EMS, and Emergency Management. Page 235 of 310 142CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Strategic & Ongoing Actions The actions listed below are aimed at implementing the overall goal to ensure fiscally responsible and carefully managed development that is aligned with growth expectations and the ability to provide safe, timely, and efficient infrastructure and services. The actions include new and strategic items as well as ongoing efforts undertaken by the City. STRATEGIC ACTIONS 8.1 Prioritize proactive infrastructure investments and programs in strategic redevelopment and infill areas. Invest in the necessary infrastructure to increase redevelopment potential or to catalyze redevelopment activity in areas identified in the Future Land Use & Character Map or in district plans. Concentrating development and services within target areas promotes efficient use of infrastructure and supports environmental resiliency goals. 8.2 Amend the zoning map and consider regulatory incentives to encourage infill and redevelopment. Apply targeted zoning strategies in designated Redevelopment Areas identified on the Future Land Use & Character Map. Review the effectiveness of the Redevelopment District (RDD) overlay zoning and consider updating provisions in the Unified Development Ordinance to incentivize infill and redevelopment. 8.3 Re-envision underutilized retail uses and incentivize redevelopment and/or reuse of vacant buildings and properties. Monitor national trends in the evolving retail sector or other sectors and continue to seek redevelopment and revitalization opportunities for vacant or underutilized sites, particularly large retail and big-box sites. 8.4 Evaluate the utilization of impact fees that provide revenues to support infrastructure demands. Consider the need to amend impact fees to promote the city’s long-term fiscal strength. ONGOING ACTIONS AND POLICY DIRECTION 8.5 Evaluate and revise the Water/Sanitary Sewer Extension Policy. Evaluate the City’s service area for sanitary sewer (the Certificate of Convenience and Necessity boundary) and extend into the Extraterritorial Jurisdiction in an incremental and carefully timed manner when it meets defined growth management objectives. Ensure that extensions to water/sewer utilities and service areas are consistent with the Future Land Use & Character Map, the City’s utility master plans, and the multi- year Capital Improvement Plan. 8.6 Conduct fiscal impact analyses. Analyze development patterns at a City-wide level to determine the true costs associated with various development types, including unfunded service costs, to provide decision makers with the best available information to ensure the City’s long-term fiscal sustainability. In addition, utilize financial modeling to evaluate the cost-to-serve for annexation requests, MUDs, and development agreement areas. 8.7 Continue the City’s Oversize Participation practice, where appropriate. Continue providing funds for potential oversize participation to reduce future infrastructure costs. 8.8 Use available tools to strategically manage growth pressure in the ETJ. Utilize development agreements and Municipal Utility Districts (MUDs) to manage growth pressure in areas where annexation is not feasible. Page 236 of 310 OCTOBER 14, 2021 The City depends on and is strengthened by strategic, effective partnerships that ensure all citizens thrive in a safe, well-connected community with exceptional services, affordable housing, and diverse amenities, and where economic prosperity is widespread and a high quality of life is attained. Mutually beneficial partnerships make effective use of resources and community capital, thus nurturing thriving cities and citizens. In a sense, a city itself is an ongoing partnership – an interconnected network of people living in close proximity for the benefits that a community provides. 9 COLLABORATIVE PARTNERSHIPS Page 237 of 310 144CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Goal Well-coordinated planning at all levels and effective engagement with local jurisdictions, institutions, and organizations to further realize the City’s vision and support the broad community. Purpose Collaborative partnerships are essential in leveraging resources for maximum efficiency and benefit. Many challenges that communities face are regional issues – like mobility network congestion and housing affordability – or are even broader in scope, such as environmental sustainability and natural disaster recovery which cross jurisdictional boundaries. In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, the importance of strong partnerships is even more pronounced. A robust network of partners and interorganizational resources strengthens community resiliency in unpredictable circumstances like the pandemic and shorter- term acute events like the 2021 winter storm and resulting utility outages. This chapter builds upon topics, ideas, and goals enumerated in previous chapters to emphasize the importance of the City’s collaborative partnerships, acknowledge existing efforts, and set the foundation for strengthening partnerships. Page 238 of 310 145CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN OVERVIEW The City of College Station engages with a wide variety of public, nonprofit, and private organizations. For example, the City collaborates with schools, fosters a thriving climate for local businesses, and partners with local nonprofits that align with City objectives. This chapter outlines three overarching pillars: internal collaboration within the City as an organization, the town-gown relationship with Texas A&M University, and other local and regional partnerships. All of the City’s partnerships are significant in facilitating the City’s services to its citizens, and most will fall into these three broad categories. As further discussed in Chapter 10: Plan Implementation, effective plan implementation requires the commitment of the City’s elected and appointed officials, staff, residents, business owners, Texas A&M University, other levels of government, and other organizations and individuals who serve as champions of the plan and its direction and strategies. Internal Collaboration The City of College Station operates more than 20 departments and employs nearly 1,000 people. The success of the City relies in large part on coordination and partnerships between departments to ensure the Comprehensive Plan – the community’s vision – is carried out. As a guiding document, the Comprehensive Plan should be referenced within master plans and departmental strategic plans to ensure that all City departments are working in tandem toward compatible goals. Additionally, the City’s capital improvement planning, departmental work, and budgeting should consult the Comprehensive Plan and its associated master plans to guarantee unified actions and objectives across the City. Public budgets and capital expenditures set priorities for funding and progress toward achieving goals expressed by the City and its citizens. These expenditures should be aligned with the City’s long-term vision. The Comprehensive Plan’s goals and strategies should be among the criteria for evaluating capital expenditures and allocating funding through annual and departmental budgets. Texas A&M University And The Town - Gown Relationship As the home of Texas A&M University, the City of College Station has unique opportunities for coordination with a premier institution that attracts people from all over the world to study, work, research, and teach. The relationship between the City and Texas A&M University – the town-gown relationship – has existed since the City’s founding in 1938 by a group of residents and university administrators who desired to create a municipal government and belt around the campus core which became the City of College Station. Throughout the years the university and City have collaborated on numerous issues and through many ad hoc, departmental, and topic or issue-based efforts. There is opportunity for bolstering the town-gown relationship and establishing a collaborative annual agenda to strengthen Texas A&M University and the City in mutually beneficial ways. Formalizing existing collaborations and potentially establishing a planning coordination task force could aid in coordinated and cohesive initiatives and development projects. This is particularly important along jurisdictional boundaries between campus and the City to create more harmonious transitions between the campus and surrounding neighborhoods, business and retail areas, and the community as a whole. The City remains committed to collaborating with the university to pave the way for better relationships between all residents of College Station, including the students, staff, and faculty of Texas A&M University and residents not affiliated with the university. The City aims to effectively manage growth within College Station that has been prompted by increasing student enrollment as well as promote community cohesion and positive living experiences between permanent and temporary residents. This could be through new collaborative initiatives or connecting students to City resources to help raise awareness about Page 239 of 310 146CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN ordinances and neighborhood norms, as well as promoting social connections and demonstrating positive neighborly interactions. Building upon existing collaborations and expanding joint efforts with Texas A&M University also brings economic benefit to both the university and City through expanded tourism opportunities. Visitors to collegiate sporting events, the George Bush Presidential Library and Museum, and university conferences and events often stay in hotel accommodations and make food and retail purchases within the City, contributing to hotel tax and sales tax revenues. The City should continue working with Texas A&M University to promote a stronger and more unified brand identity to attract visitors and associated tourism dollars to the community. Another key opportunity for coordination between the City and academic departments, institutes, and operational units is to capitalize on university research and expertise and help raise awareness of environmental stewardship and sustainable practices within the community. This could range from innovative engineering research to climate and resiliency planning to testing new mobility technologies. The City and Texas A&M University would benefit from linking the university’s educational mission with community needs. Research can also lead to economic development opportunities for the City and region. Regional Partnerships The City collaborates with neighboring jurisdictions, local institutions, nonprofit organizations, and regional planning agencies on topics such as land use and mobility planning, affordable and workforce housing, economic development, job creation, and tourism. The City maintains interlocal, mutual aid, and development agreements with surrounding counties, institutions, service providers, and private developments to ensure efficient infrastructure and exceptional Page 240 of 310 147CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN services are provided to all College Station citizens to maintain a high quality of life. These agreements establish partnership responsibilities within the College Station city limits and the City’s ETJ for items such as subdivision review, thoroughfare planning, floodplain management, utility infrastructure, and service provision. The City will continue to pursue collaborative partnerships and agreements as matters of mutual interest and as opportunities for coordination arise. HOUSING & DEVELOPMENT Affordable housing is crucial for a community’s overall success, as it promotes inclusion, mitigates gentrification, and encourages responsible economic growth. The City of College Station is dedicated to promoting diverse affordable housing options and expanding the opportunities to secure affordable homeownership and/or rental assistance. To provide affordable housing assistance, the City will continue to actively engage in partnerships with local organizations like the Brazos County Home Repair Coalition, Bryan/College Station Habitat for Humanity, Brazos Valley Community Action Programs, Elder Aid, and Brazos County Council of Governments as discussed in Chapter 3: Strong Neighborhoods. In a broader sense, the relationship between the City and private developers functions as a collaborative partnership in which developers help to shape the built environment and carry out the citizens’ vision and plan. The City will continue to foster collaboration and communication with the development community and encourage development patterns that promote outcomes in line with well-being, inclusion, equity, and a high quality of life. The narrative in Chapter 2: Distinctive Places along with the Future Land Use & Character Map detail the ideal development patterns and opportunities for future growth, infill, and appropriate redevelopment to realize the desired character and community identity. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, JOBS & TOURISM The City’s long-term economic development goals to diversify the local economy, attract new employers and competitive jobs, support entrepreneurs and small businesses, and provide a diversified tax base are tied closely to the City’s synergy with regional partners. As discussed previously, Texas A&M University is a key partner, as are the Brazos Valley Economic Development Corporation, the Chamber of Commerce, and local area businesses. The City works diligently to recruit events and tourist-related activities to College Station including sports tourism, conventions, and leisure events. The City partners with local businesses to create cohesive campaigns for tourists and residents to enjoy. The Economic Development Master Plan further discusses strategic initiatives and partnerships that help realize the City’s goal of a prosperous economy that works for all citizens. LOCAL SCHOOLS To fully anticipate population growth and demand in College Station, the City must collaborate with Texas A&M University, Blinn College, the College Station Independent School District (CSISD), and public charter schools to understand their growth trends and organizational goals for increased enrollment, future facility needs, and the associated impacts on the City such as infrastructure demands, housing needs, and traffic and mobility concerns. In the case of local K-12 institutions, it particularly important to anticipate and prepare for new school locations or changed use or capacity of existing schools. Likewise, the location and development of new neighborhoods necessitates the demand for new schools. The City will continue to work with the leadership of the CSISD and public charter schools to address siting and infrastructure needs, ensure safe and walkable areas around schools, and collaborate on other issues that present opportunities for joint efforts. Page 241 of 310 148CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN MOBILITY The City of College Station partners with a number of regional planning organizations focused on mobility system planning across jurisdictions. The City coordinates with the Bryan-College Station Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), the Brazos Valley Council of Governments (BVCOG), the Brazos County Regional Mobility Authority (RMA), the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), Brazos Transit District, and Texas A&M University at different levels to accomplish regional transportation goals. Mobility networks are a clear example of the need for collaborative planning, as these systems provide tangible connections across jurisdictional boundaries. The City will continue to engage and be a leader in interjurisdictional mobility partnerships, with a view towards continuing to champion alternative modes as discussed in Chapter 6: Integrated Mobility. SERVICE PROVISION & INFRASTRUCTURE Public Safety: The College Station Police, Fire, Emergency Medical Services (EMS), and Emergency Management coordinate with local and regional partners to provide public safety services and ensure the safety of the community. The Police Department coordinates with the Texas Department of Public Safety, Texas A&M University Police Department, federal law enforcement agencies, the Brazos County Sheriff’s Department, and the constables and Justice of the Peace courts, all of which have jurisdiction within the city limits of College Station. The Fire Department serves a primary response area within the city limits and the Texas A&M University campus and a secondary response with automatic aid with the City of Bryan. Mutual aid agreements for fire suppression are in place with Brazos County volunteer fire departments and Brayton Fire Training School for times of extreme need. EMS serves a primary response area within the city limits and southern Brazos County and a secondary response with automatic aid to the City of Bryan. Mutual aid agreements for EMS are in place with Texas A&M University EMS and St. Joseph EMS. The City participates in proactive emergency management as part of a larger county-wide effort with Brazos County, the City of Bryan, and Texas A&M University. Members of this group send representatives to the Brazos County Community Emergency Operations Center (CEOC) where mitigation efforts and Page 242 of 310 149CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN coordination between these jurisdictions occurs. Natural disaster and emergency events occur without regard for borders, so an interjurisdictional response is necessary to plan for and respond adequately to emergency events. Solid Waste & Recycling: The cities of College Station and Bryan partner to manage and operate the Brazos Valley Solid Waste Management Agency (BVSWMA). BVSWMA currently operates the Twin Oaks Landfill located in Grimes County which accepts waste from Brazos, Burleson, Grimes, Leon, Madison, Washington, and Robertson counties, and Texas A&M University. Libraries: The cities of College Station and Bryan maintain an interlocal agreement for a regional library system, with library locations and services in both cities free of charge to all Brazos County residents. Utilities: The City of College Station provides electric, water, and wastewater infrastructure and services to citizens, along with fiber optic infrastructure to City facilities. While College Station Utilities (CSU) is the primary electric provider in College Station, Bryan Texas Utilities (BTU) serves areas incorporated into the City after 2002. CSU and BTU coordinate on service provision and future needs. College Station Water Services is the primary provider of water and wastewater services in College Station. Other providers, such as Wellborn Special Utility District and Wickson Creek Special Utility District, provide water services along the boundaries of the City’s certificated area and into Brazos, Burleson, and Grimes counties. College Station’s Water Services Department coordinates with these providers, particularly on projects near the boundaries between certificated areas. The City also has two municipal utility districts with agreements that define how utilities are provided and how the City may annex these areas in the future when they are substantially developed. The City also owns and maintains a fiber optic network to provide service to City-owned facilities. The City coordinates and maintains agreements with various private providers, such as Suddenlink and Frontier, for the provision of ultra-high-speed internet services to their College Station customers. The City will continue to pursue collaborate relationships, coordinated services, and cooperative agreements with regional partners to make efficient use of resources and community capital and provide excellent services to the community. More on the City’s services, existing infrastructure, and future needs can be found in Chapter 7: Exceptional Services and Chapter 8: Managed Growth. Page 243 of 310 150CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Strategic & Ongoing Actions The actions listed below will help achieve the goal of well-coordinated planning at all levels and effective engagement with local jurisdictions, institutions, and organizations to further realize the City’s vision and support the broad community. INTERNAL COORDINATION 9.1 Reference the Comprehensive Plan actions within City master plans. City master plans are components of the Comprehensive Plan. Master plans should be updated on a regular cycle (or as needed). The updates should include provisions that relate directly to actions within the Comprehensive Plan and the Future Land Use & Character Map. 9.2 Reference the Comprehensive Plan and City master plans in Capital Improvements Planning, departmental work programs, and budgeting processes. Alignment with the City’s long-term plans should be among the criteria for evaluating potential capital or operating expenditures. EXTERNAL PARTNERSHIPS AND COLLABORATION Texas A&M University 9.3 Establish a university/city annual agenda. Conduct an annual meeting between leadership of the City and Texas A&M University to reflect on the previous year’s successes and challenges and to establish a collaborative agenda for the next 12 months. The intention of the agenda created is to strengthen both partners in a way that student success and faculty/staff retention is also improved. Participants would be from the highest leadership levels of Texas A&M University and the City and mutually committed to a best-in-class town-gown relationship. 9.4 Gather growth expectations. Work with Texas A&M University and other higher education institutions concerning their projected enrollment growth and associated faculty/staff increases to plan effectively for the implications of further off-campus housing demand. 9.5 Formalize ongoing collaborations and establish a planning coordination task force with Texas A&M University and the City. Continue to coordinate with Texas A&M University regarding the benefits and impacts of university development projects and support ongoing efforts to provide harmonious transitions between the campus and the surrounding area. These meetings should continue to take place regularly. 9.6 Continue “good neighbor” initiatives with Texas A&M for permanent and temporary residents. Build upon existing programs to promote positive living experiences for students and long- term residents in city neighborhoods. Activities could include community discussions, a lecture series, door-to-door visits, or neighborhood gatherings. The activities would raise awareness about ordinances, positively communicate neighborhood norms, promote social interaction, and demonstrate what it means to be a “good neighbor.” 9.7 Contribute to a joint branding effort with Texas A&M University. Continue to work with Texas A&M University to define and promote a stronger and more unified brand identity. This includes not only graphics but, more importantly, the underlying messages and strategies to share the brand work. Page 244 of 310 151CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 9.8 Expand tourism opportunities with Texas A&M University. Expand partnerships with Texas A&M University to recruit, create, and magnify tourism opportunities at university facilities and beyond. 9.9 Pursue partnerships with Texas A&M University regarding environmental stewardship. Encourage collaborations with academic departments, institutes, and operational units to capitalize on university research and expertise and help raise awareness of environmental stewardship and sustainable practices within the community. Other Local and Regional Coordination 9.10 Convene coordination meetings with neighboring jurisdictions and regional planning organizations. Participate in collaborative efforts, such as the Intergovernmental Committee and others, on land use, infrastructure, facilities planning, and other planning issues of mutual interest. Seek opportunities to align policies or share services to create a stronger region and more efficiently utilize resources. 9.11 Pursue interlocal cooperation agreements. Pursue and maintain beneficial agreements with Brazos, Grimes, and Burleson counties, City of Bryan, Texas A&M University, and other service providers, as appropriate. Such agreements can address coordination of subdivision review, thoroughfare planning, floodplain management, and utility and other service provision, among other matters of mutual interest. 9.12 Continue to coordinate with the College Station Independent School District and public charter schools. Coordination should address facility needs and projections, potential locations for new schools or future use of existing schools, infrastructure impacts of school development, and ensuring safe/walkable areas around schools. 9.13 Continue to participate in regional mobility initiatives. Partner with the Bryan-College Station Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), the Brazos County Regional Mobility Authority (RMA), Brazos Valley Council of Governments (BVCOG), Texas A&M University, Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), Brazos Transit District, Interstate 14 and Loop 214, Easterwood Airport flight network expansion, Texas High Speed Rail Initiative, freight transport, and Union Pacific on initiatives such as the Brazos Yard and quiet zones. Page 245 of 310 OCTOBER 14, 2021 10 PLAN IMPLEMENTATION Page 246 of 310 153CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN The Comprehensive Plan is the City of College Station’s broadest and most long-term policy guide. It serves as a statement of the community’s vision for the future. The plan details goals, policies, and actions on a broad range of topics and provides strategic direction to guide the City’s physical growth while maintaining a high quality of life. Implementation is not simply a list of action items. The Comprehensive Plan must be referred to frequently to guide decision-making and ensure the community’s vision and goals are ultimately achieved. Effective plan implementation requires the commitment of the City’s elected and appointed officials, staff, residents, business owners, Texas A&M University, other levels of government, and other organizations and individuals who serve as champions of the plan and its direction and strategies. Equally important are formal procedures for the ongoing monitoring and reporting of successes achieved, difficulties encountered, new opportunities and challenges that emerge, and any other changing conditions that require rethinking priorities. This final chapter details a practical, prioritized, and sequenced implementation program. It establishes a protocol for regular reporting and evaluation of progress. Each year, the City prepares a summary report of notable plan progress and development activities. At five-year intervals, a more thorough evaluation is prepared which typically leads to amendments to the plan itself. Plan Implementation Methods The goals, policies, and actions in this plan should be consulted frequently and used widely by decision- makers as a basis for judgments regarding: • Proposed development and redevelopment applications • Zone change requests and other zoning-related actions • The timing and availability of infrastructure improvements • Expansion of public facilities, services, and programs • Annual capital budgeting • Requests for strategic development agreements, municipal utility districts, or voluntary annexations • Potential re-writes and amendments to the City’s Unified Development Ordinance and related code elements • Intergovernmental coordination and agreements (including city/university, inter-city, and city/ county), and • Operations, capital improvements, and programming related to individual City departments The Comprehensive Plan is supported by several focused master plans, district, and neighborhood plans. Collectively, these planning efforts are implemented by many short-term strategic plans, annual budgets, and the City’s ordinances, codes, and development standards, as seen in Figure 10.1: Comprehensive Plan Direction & Implementation. Page 247 of 310 154CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Figure 10.1: Comprehensive Plan Direction & Implementation COMPREHENSIVE PLANOVERALL CITY- WIDE DIRECTION Contains the city’s broad vision, goals, high-level policies and actions. Addresses citywide needs, opportunities, and aspirations. A guide for more specific planning policy decisions, investments, and regulations. • Long term, 20-year horizon but reviewed at five year intervals. FOCUSED PLANNING Detailed studies and specific strategies for a topic or area. IMPLEMENTATION Short-term strategic plans and regulations. Master Plans Detailed plans focused on a particular city service, facility or resource that affects the city as a whole. • Provides specific recommendations tailored to the needs of the service, facility or resource. • Examines aspects relevant to the topic. • Living documents that should be maintained and updated regularly or as-needed. Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) A five-year plan for funding and implementing projects that address infrastructure needs such as streets, parks and public facilities. The CIP should show alignment with the Comprehensive Plan and focused plans. Departmental Work Programs & Budget Annual work programs and budgets should align with the Comprehensive Plan and other plans. Codes & Ordinances The governing regulations adopted by the city that include the Unified Deleopment Ordinance (the city’s zoning code). These legal tools are critical to implement many of the Comprehensive Plan’s physical development objectives including redevelopment and neighborhood integrity. Codes and Ordinances should be reviewed upon adoption of a district or neighborhood plan or as other needs arise. City Council Strategic Plan City council strategic priorities may be considered annually and should support implementation of the city’s various long- term plans. District & Neighborhood Plans Detailed plans focused on a geographic area of the city such as a neighborhood, corridor or special district. • Provides specific recommendations tailored to the needs of the area. • Considering all spects of an area, including future land use, character, transportation and connectivity, parls and open space, servies, economic development and infrastructure. • Have a limited (typically 10-year) horizon, during which time recommendations should be implemented or incorporated into the Comprehensive Plan. Page 248 of 310 155CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN There are five general methods for plan implementation: (1) Policy-based decisions (2) Land development regulations and engineering standards (3) Capital improvements programming (4) Focused planning efforts and studies, and (5) Special projects, programs, and initiatives POLICY-BASED DECISIONS Land use and development decisions should be made based on the strategies set forth in this Comprehensive Plan. Decisions regarding growth, infrastructure investment, Future Land Use & Character Map amendments, and right-of-way acquisitions are generally left to the broad discretion of the City Council, meaning the Comprehensive Plan serves as the principal source of guidance in these decision- making processes. The policy guidance and actions within the Comprehensive Plan are meant to ensure that development patterns are consistent with the intended character for specific neighborhoods, districts, and corridors. The adoption of new or amended land development regulations (e.g., zoning, subdivision, landscaping, sign controls, etc.) establish a framework for evaluating private development proposals in light of the City’s articulated priorities and action recommendations detailed in the Comprehensive Plan. LAND DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS AND ENGINEERING STANDARDS Land development regulations and engineering standards are fundamentals for Comprehensive Plan implementation. It is often underappreciated that private investment decisions account for much of any city’s physical form. Zoning, subdivision regulations, associated development criteria, and technical engineering standards are the basic elements that ensure the form, character, and quality of private development reflect the City’s planning objectives. Ordinances should reflect the community’s desire for quality development outcomes that are consistent with Comprehensive Plan goals and strategies. CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAMMING A Capital Improvements Program is a multi-year plan (typically five years) that identifies budgeted capital projects including street infrastructure, water, wastewater, drainage facilities, parks, trails, and greenways, recreation facility construction and upgrades, construction of public buildings, and the purchase of major equipment. Identifying and budgeting for major capital improvements is essential to implementing this Comprehensive Plan. Decisions regarding the prioritization of proposed capital improvements must consider the strategies and action recommendations of this plan. FOCUSED PLANNING EFFORTS AND STUDIES There are many areas in which additional planning work has been completed or is recommended to achieve a finer degree of detail than is covered within this Comprehensive Plan. Certain strategies are further detailed and implemented through topic-based plans, such as the Economic Development Master Plan, Water Utility Master Plan, or Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan. Other strategies are implemented through small-area plans, such as neighborhood, district, corridor, or redevelopment plans. Page 249 of 310 156CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN SPECIAL PROJECTS, PROGRAMS, AND INITIATIVES Special projects, programs, and initiatives comprise the final category of implementation measures. These include initiating or amending City programs, interlocal agreements, citizen participation programs, training, and other types of special projects to achieve outcomes specified within the Comprehensive Plan. Plan Administration While developing and updating this plan, government representatives, business owners, neighborhood representatives, civic groups, Texas A&M University representatives, and stakeholders and citizens from across the community all contributed time and input. One of the most integral pieces to maintain any comprehensive plan’s momentum and effective implementation is continual commitment to and championing of the plan’s policies and actions. EDUCATION While comprehensive plans are broad in scope, they remain complex policy documents that account for interrelationships among various policy choices such as how growth decisions and development patterns may affect the City’s emergency response capabilities, or how projected demographic trends are likely to impact the local housing market. As such, educating decision-makers and administrators about plan implementation is an important and continual effort. The principal groups responsible for implementing the Plan (City Council, Planning and Zoning Commission, and City department heads) should all be on the same page regarding the priorities, responsibilities, and interpretations of this plan. ROLE DEFINITION As the community’s elected officials, the City Council assumes the lead role in implementation of the Comprehensive Plan. The key responsibilities of the City Council are to decide and establish priorities, set timeframes by which each action will be initiated and completed, and determine the budget to be made available for implementation efforts. Together the City Manager and City Council must ensure effective coordination among the various groups responsible for carrying out the plan’s recommendations. The City Council will lead in the following areas: • Act as champions of the plan • Adopt and amend the plan by ordinance, after recommendations by the Planning and Zoning Commission • Adopt new or amended land development regulations to implement the plan • Approve interlocal agreements that implement the plan • Establish the overall action priorities and timeframes by which each action item will be initiated and completed • Consider and approve the funding commitments that will be required • Offer final approval of projects, activities, and the associated costs during the budget process, keeping in mind the need for consistency with the plan and its strategies and actions, and • Provide policy direction to the Planning and Zoning Commission, other appointed City boards and commissions, and City staff Page 250 of 310 157CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN The Planning and Zoning Commission will lead in the following areas: • Periodically obtain public input to keep the plan up to date, using a variety of community outreach and citizen and stakeholder involvement methods • Ensure that recommendations offered to the City Council reflect the plan goals, policies, and action recommendations. This relates particularly to decisions involving development review and approval, zone change requests, and ordinance amendments, and • After holding one or more public hearings to discuss new or evolving community issues and needs, make recommendations to the City Council regarding plan updates and amendments City Staff will lead in the following areas: • Manage day-to-day implementation of the plan and ongoing coordination across departments • Support and carry out capital improvement programming efforts • Manage the drafting of new or amended land development regulations • Conduct studies and develop additional plans • Review applications for consistency with the Comprehensive Plan as required by the City’s land development regulations • Negotiate the details of interlocal agreements • Administer collaborative programs and ensure open channels of communication with various private, public, and non-profit implementation partners, and • Maintain an inventory of potential plan amendments as suggested by City staff and others for consideration during annual and periodic plan review and update processes Action Plan The vision and goals in a comprehensive plan are attained through a multitude of specific actions. To this end, both long- and short-range implementation tasks must be identified along with a timeframe and an assignment of responsibilities. Table 10.1, Action Plan & Funding Sources highlights the recommended actions that are included throughout this Comprehensive Plan to implement the plan’s goals and policy recommendations. The list of implementation actions should be evaluated annually to determine if progress has been made and which additional items are ready for implementation within the short-term horizon. The table is organized as follows: • Task Type. This relates back to the five types of implementation methods highlighted earlier in this chapter (policy focused, regulatory focused, capital focused, planning/study focused, program/ initiative focused). • Coordination Roles. In addition to identifying which City department(s) or function(s) would lead a task, the table also highlights a variety of local and regional agencies that might have a role to play in certain initiatives, perhaps through potential cost-sharing, technical assistance, direct cooperation, or by providing input and feedback on a matter in which they have some mutual interest. In particular, whenever potential regulatory actions or revised development standards are to be considered, participation of the development community is essential to ensure adequate consensus building. Page 251 of 310 158CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN • Funding Sources. This indicates typical ways to finance plan implementation efforts. Primary and ongoing sources include the City’s annual operating budget, as well as multi-year capital budgeting which is not strictly for physical construction projects but also for funding significant studies and plans (e.g., utility master plans) intended to lay the groundwork for long-term capital projects. Other outside funding opportunities – such as other governmental spending (County, State, or Federal), grant opportunities, non-profit partnerships, public/private partnerships, private development, in-kind volunteer contributions, and others – also play a significant role in implementing the Comprehensive Plan. FISCAL ANALYSIS The Action Plan & Funding Sources table (Table 10.1) provides a starting point for determining priorities for immediate, near-term, and longer- term task implementation. It is an important step toward plan implementation and should be consulted regularly to help guide the City Council’s annual strategic planning process, the City’s annual budget process, Capital Improvements Program preparation, and departmental planning. Once the necessary funding is committed and roles are defined, the Director of Planning & Development Services in conjunction with the City Manager should initiate work programs to ensure implementation. With any comprehensive and long-range planning effort that spans a 10- or 20-year horizon, there are unknown projects, initiatives, and costs that cannot be fully anticipated at the beginning of the planning process. A key component of implementing the Comprehensive Plan is fully understanding its financial impact to establish fiscal sustainability as a critical metric for analyzing existing and future development patterns and new development proposals, managing growth, and budgeting through the annual budget processes, capital improvement programming, and departmental planning. The City will conduct a fiscal analysis to better understand which development types and patterns are revenue positive and which pose significant unfunded costs to the City that are not recouped over time. The fiscal impact analysis will evaluate development patterns at a City-wide level to determine the true costs associated with various development types, including unfunded service costs, to provide decision makers with the best available information to ensure the City’s long-term fiscal sustainability. A comprehensive fiscal analysis could look at revenues per acre based on property and sales tax data to reflect the true fiscal contribution and costs of different development patterns more accurately. One of the biggest challenges is adequately accounting for unfunded services costs and liabilities that a city is expected to provide – such as public safety personnel, equipment, deferred maintenance and infrastructure needs, and operational costs for additional city facilities and necessary staffing. In addition, financial modeling must be utilized to evaluate the cost-to-serve and benefits to the City for development along the City’s edge through voluntary annexation requests, municipal utility districts (MUDs), or development agreements. This 10-year update to the plan prioritizes infill and redevelopment in strategic locations to ensure the long- term fiscal sustainability of our City. Infill and redevelopment opportunities help reduce or eliminate some unfunded costs by more efficiently utilizing existing infrastructure, facilities, and City staff resources by encouraging growth in areas with existing capacity to maximize efficiency. Page 252 of 310 ACTION NUMBER2021 UPDATE ACTION ITEM TASK TYPE CITY - RESPONSIBLE PARTY PARTNERS - INTERNAL PARTNERS - EXTERNAL FUNDING SOURCES CITY / DEPT. BUDGETSCIP BUDGETOTHER GOV’TSGRANTSPRIVATE / OTHER2.1 Review and undertake amendments to the Unified Development Ordinance’s zoning districts. Consider amendments necessary to implement the Future Land Use & Character categories and definitions. Regulation Planning & Development Services City Manager’s Office B/CS Apartment Association B/CS Realtors Association B/CS Home Builders Association Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  2.2 Prioritize and undertake detailed plans for priority neighborhoods, districts, corridors, or redevelopment areas. The City should commit to proactively planning for a limited set of target areas, as specified in Map 2.1, Planning Areas. Focused planning effort Planning & Development Services City Manager’s Office Capital Improvement Projects Community Services CSU - Water Services Economic Development & Tourism Neighborhood Services Parks & Recreation Public Works B/CS Metropolitan Planning Organization Texas A&M University Texas Dept. of Transportation B/CS Apartment Association B/CS Home Builders Association Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  2.3 Creative incentives and programs to revitalize existing areas and established neighborhoods. This could include façade or landscaping improvement programs or rehabilitation initiatives. New programs should align with and complement existing City efforts through the Neighborhood Partnership Program, Neighborhood Grant Program, and proposed property maintenance programming. Project / program Neighborhood Services Community Services Planning & Development Services City Manager’s Office Capital Improvement Projects Economic Development & Tourism Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  2.4 Evaluate existing policies and create incentives for low impact and sustainable development. Encourage policies and regulations that incentivize sustainable practices such as energy reduction, renewable energy, water conservation, protection of natural resources, use of native and adapted vegetation, adaptive reuse, waste minimization, and stormwater management. Policy- based decision Planning & Development Services City Manager’s Office CSU - Water Services CSU - Utilities Parks & Recreation Public Works Texas A&M University City of Bryan Brazos County Brazos Valley Solid Waste Management Agency  2.5 Pursue feasibility of a tree preservation and/or tree planting incentive program. This could involve regulatory changes, incentives to preserve existing trees (especially large canopy trees) in new development and redevelopment projects, requiring replacement of trees that are destroyed or removed, proactive efforts by the City such as planting trees and installing landscaping along major road corridors and gateways, or a program where the City or a partner agency provides trees at reduced cost. Project / program Planning & Development Services Parks & Recreation City Manager’s Office Capital Improvement Projects Public Works Keep Brazos Beautiful Texas Dept. of Transportation Texas A&M University & Master Gardners  2.6 Create additional incentives for conservation design and evaluate the effectiveness of cluster development standards in the Unified Development Ordinance. Common incentives include density bonuses where a project may be permitted a greater total density in exchange for preservation of common open space areas. Policy- based decision Planning & Development Services City Manager’s Office Parks & Recreation B/CS Home Builders Association Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  2.7 Integrate parks, greenways, and community facilities within new neighborhoods. Ensure that parks, greenways, and other types of open spaces are integrated into the design of new neighborhoods and that appropriate connections are made to existing facilities. Also consider opportunities and partnerships to locate civic uses (such as recreation centers, schools, libraries) within new neighborhoods or redevelopment areas. Regulation Parks & Recreation Planning & Development Services B/CS Home Builders Association Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  Table 10.1 - Action Plans & Funding Sources Page 253 of 310 ACTION NUMBER2021 UPDATE ACTION ITEM TASK TYPE CITY - RESPONSIBLE PARTY PARTNERS - INTERNAL PARTNERS - EXTERNAL FUNDING SOURCES CITY / DEPT. BUDGETSCIP BUDGETOTHER GOV’TSGRANTSPRIVATE / OTHER2.8 Evaluate and update development standards in the Unified Development Ordinance. Evaluate the effectiveness of development standards such as mobility and connectivity, off-street parking, building form and design, landscaping and buffers, exterior lighting, or other applicable standards to achieve desired design form and quality. Regulation Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office B/CS Apartment Association B/CS Realtors Association B/CS Home Builders Association Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  2.9 Develop or refine incentives to promote high quality design. Such incentives may include regulatory (flexible standards, density bonuses), procedural, cost-sharing agreements, and tax incentives, among others. Incentives could be targeted to specific geographies or types of development (such as mixed-use or commercial). Policy-based decision Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office Economic Development & Tourism B/CS Apartment Association B/CS Realtors Association B/CS Home Builders Association Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  2.10 Encourage parking alternatives to support redevelopment opportunities. Use regulatory or other incentives to encourage residential, commercial, and mixed development models in the City’s targeted Redevelopment Areas that integrate structured parking, reduced parking requirements, or shared parking agreements to enable more productive use of the overall site in place of extensive surface parking. Regulation Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office Economic Development & Tourism B/CS Apartment Association B/CS Realtors Association B/CS Home Builders Association Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  2.11 Continue to initiate proactive zoning map updates. Amend the zoning map in strategic areas to encourage transitions to the desired community character and help implement the Future Land Use & Character Map. Proactive zoning map changes may also encourage redevelopment in targeted areas. Policy-based decision Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office Economic Development & Tourism B/CS Apartment Association B/CS Realtors Association B/CS Home Builders Association Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  2.12 Continue beautification programs. Maintain and consider opportunities to expand beautification partnerships with Keep Brazos Beautiful and other organizations. Project / program Public Works Community Services Neighborhood Services Parks & Recreation Planning & Development Services Keep Brazos Beautiful Texas Dept. of Transportation  3.1 Evaluate the effectiveness and refine neighborhood compatibility standards in the UDO. Standards in the UDO should address compatibility of infill and redevelopment within established neighborhoods and appropriate transitions between land uses, particularly between neighborhoods and more intense commercial or mixed-use development adjacent to a neighborhood.  Regulation Planning & Development Services Community Services Neighborhood Services B/CS Apartment Association B/CS Realtors Association B/CS Home Builders Association Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  3.2 Create a neighborhood planning toolkit. Build upon Neighborhood Services efforts and establish a process for neighborhood organizations to undertake a City-supported project in their area, or to create City-supported projects and policies for their area. Project / program Neighborhood Services City Manager's Office Community Services Planning & Development Services Public Communications Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  3.3 Create and promote a housing maintenance educational program. Create an education/promotional campaign to raise awareness of existing resources to maintain and enhance the existing housing stock including City grants and federal programs. Develop an educational program to assist residents in learning basic home maintenance and repair skills. Project / program Community Services City Manager's Office Neighborhood Services Public Communications Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers State / federal agencies  Page 254 of 310 ACTION NUMBER2021 UPDATE ACTION ITEM TASK TYPE CITY - RESPONSIBLE PARTY PARTNERS - INTERNAL PARTNERS - EXTERNAL FUNDING SOURCES CITY / DEPT. BUDGETSCIP BUDGETOTHER GOV’TSGRANTSPRIVATE / OTHER3.4 Expand affordable housing and workforce housing. Continue to support efforts, programs, and incentives aimed at developing affordable housing stock and assisting low- and moderate-income citizens to secure affordable homeownership and/or rental opportunities. Project / program Community Services City Manager's Office Neighborhood Services Planning & Development Services Public Communications Brazos County Home Repair Coalition B/CS Habitat for Humanity Brazos Valley Community Action Programs Elder Aid Brazos County Council of Governments State / federal agencies Private developers  3.5 Develop a parking strategy for neighborhoods near the university. Coordinate with Texas A&M University regarding university-related parking to prevent excessive on-street parking in areas adjacent to the university. Evaluate the feasibility of a program to address management of parking in adjacent neighborhoods.  Project / program Community Services Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office Neighborhood Services Public Communications Police Fire Texas A&M University Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  3.6 Develop and refine data monitoring processes to analyze housing trends and define a strategic set of actions to address housing affordability, diversity, and gentrification. Consider existing market data, best practices, and existing regulations and incentives. Project / program Community Services City Manager's Office Planning & Development Services B/CS Association of Realtors Texas A&M Real Estate Research Center  3.7 Continue to track neighborhood change. Continue maintaining an inventory of community development trends and housing conditions by block or neighborhood in areas with a high propensity for change to identify potential areas at risk of decline and to combat displacement of existing residents. Existing data on demolitions, building permits, or occupancy could also be compiled and reviewed on a regular basis. Project / program Community Services City Manager's Office Planning & Development Services B/CS Association of Realtors Texas A&M Real Estate Research Center  3.8 Evaluate relevancy of neighborhood and small area plans that are beyond their planning horizon. Develop a process to either retire or update plans. Project / program Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects CSU - Water Services Public Works Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  3.9 Continue partnering with local nonprofit organizations and area partners to support affordable housing options. Continue partnerships with organizations such as the Brazos County Home Repair Coalition, Bryan/College Station Habitat for Humanity, Brazos Valley Community Action Programs, Elder Aid, Brazos County Council of Governments, and housing tax credit developers. Project / program Community Services City Manager's Office Brazos County Home Repair Coalition B/CS Habitat for Humanity Brazos Valley Community Action Programs Elder Aid Brazos County Council of Governments State / federal agencies  3.10 Continue outreach and educational efforts to support existing and encourage new neighborhood organizations. Continue Neighborhood Services initiatives such as Seminar Suppers, Neighborhood Newsletters, and training programs. Project / program Neighborhood Services City Manager's Office Planning & Development Services Public Communications Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  3.11 Continue to fund the Neighborhood Grant Program. Continue to fund and expand the Neighborhood Grant Program for neighborhood activities such as gateways, landscaping, and other permit application fees. Project / program Neighborhood Services City Manager's Office Planning & Development Services Public Communications Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  3.12 Require neighborhood meetings for certain development applications. This provides a forum for applicants and neighbors to resolve conflicts in an informal setting before an application is submitted or prior to formal consideration of the item. Regulation Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office Neighborhood Services Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers B/CS Home Builders Association  Page 255 of 310 ACTION NUMBER2021 UPDATE ACTION ITEM TASK TYPE CITY - RESPONSIBLE PARTY PARTNERS - INTERNAL PARTNERS - EXTERNAL FUNDING SOURCES CITY / DEPT. BUDGETSCIP BUDGETOTHER GOV’TSGRANTSPRIVATE / OTHER3.12 Require neighborhood meetings for certain development applications. This provides a forum for applicants and neighbors to resolve conflicts in an informal setting before an application is submitted or prior to formal consideration of the item. Regulation Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office Neighborhood Services Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers B/CS Home Builders Association  3.14 Evaluate the effectiveness of short-term rental regulations. Periodically evaluate short-term rental regulations with respect to local data, national trends, and emerging technology, to support neighborhood integrity. Regulation Community Services City Manager's Office Planning & Development Services B/CS Realtors Association Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  3.15 Evaluate and refine the rental registration program. Periodically evaluate the rental registration program with respect to local data and trends to support neighborhood integrity. Regulation Community Services City Manager's Office Planning & Development Services B/CS Apartment Association B/CS Realtors Association Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  5.1 Continue to support, promote, and operate major arts, entertainment, sporting, and cultural destinations through cumulative actions. Utilize digital platforms and coordinate with the Economic Development & Tourism Department to promote cultural and entertainment offerings. Promote the multi-purpose mission of the Wolf Pen Creek and Northgate Districts as live music destinations and areas to live, work, and play. Project / program Parks & Recreation Economic Development & Tourism City Managers Office Public Communications Brazos Valley Economic Development Corp. B/CS Chamber of Commerce City of Bryan Texas A&M University  5.2 Maintain and expand community-based greenway and open space preservation programs. Through the Adopt-a-Greenway and parks volunteer programs, continue involving neighborhood and community groups in preservation and maintenance programs. Project / program Parks & Recreation Planning & Development Services Public Communications Texas A&M University Student organizations Community organizations  5.3 Continue to expand outreach about the parks and greenway system. Enhance awareness and accessibility to programs and facilities through the City’s website, publications, and media outlets. Project / program Parks & Recreation Planning & Development Services Public Communications Local media outlets  5.4 Support a community-wide public art program. Contribute to the expansion of a public art program in conjunction with the Arts Council of Brazos Valley, the City of Bryan, Texas A&M University, and the Texas Department of Transportation. Project / program Parks & Recreation City Manager's Office Public Communications Arts Council of the Brazos Valley City of Bryan Texas A&M University Texas Dept of Transportation Public-private partnerships  5.5 Continue leisure, health, and educational programming. Continue the City’s role in offering leisure, health, and educational activities to citizens of all ages through the City’s Parks & Recreation department programming. Project / program Parks & Recreation Public Communications  5.6 Identify and secure public and private funds for the acquisition of parks, greenways, and facilities. Ensure adequate parkland and greenway provisions through the Parkland Dedication Ordinance, the Capital Improvements Program, annual budgets, City property acquisition programs, external dollars, foundations, and public-private partnerships. Explore opportunities for connections between developments, conservation easements, or additional provisions that require dedication of open space. Policy-based decision Parks & Recreation City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects Planning & Development Services Public-private partnerships Foundations  5.7 Continue inter-agency coordination and establish new public-private partnerships to provide additional amenities, funding, networking, and co-production opportunities. Seek partnerships with other public agencies and public-private partnerships to provide recreational amenities, greenways, and services where mutually beneficial opportunities are available to ensure financial sustainability and quality of all programs. Policy-based decision Parks & Recreation City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects Planning & Development Services City of Bryan Brazos County Texas A&M University Public-private partnerships  Page 256 of 310 ACTION NUMBER2021 UPDATE ACTION ITEM TASK TYPE CITY - RESPONSIBLE PARTY PARTNERS - INTERNAL PARTNERS - EXTERNAL FUNDING SOURCES CITY / DEPT. BUDGETSCIP BUDGETOTHER GOV’TSGRANTSPRIVATE / OTHER5.8 Evaluate, amend, and develop relevant ordinances to protect natural resources, habitats, and green-water infrastructure. Consider amendments to the Parkland Dedication Ordinance and other ordinances to include provisions or incentives that encourage developers to design and build parks and greenway trails that preserve natural areas. Regulation Parks & Recreation Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office City Attorney B/CS Association of Realtors B/CS Home Builders Association Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  5.9 Investigate the feasibility of incorporating riparian buffer standards to preserve sensitive land along waterways. Consider the feasibility of amending ordinances to better preserve potentially sensitive land along waterways to mitigate flood risks, protect water quality, and provide for parks and greenway opportunities.  Regulation Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office City Attorney Parks & Recreation B/CS Association of Realtors B/CS Home Builders Association Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  5.10 Consider new and enhanced natural resource management strategies that promote environmental sustainability and stewardship and improve quality of life. Consider the effect of urban heat islands on the City’s residents, wildlife, and natural environment. Identify areas for enhanced stewardship practices such as “no mow zones,” native or adaptive plantings, and pollinator areas to support wildlife and enhance biodiversity. Policy-based decision Parks & Recreation Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office Public Works Texas A&M University & Master Gardeners Keep Brazos Beautiful  5.11 Invest in the redevelopment of existing parks. Identify new improvements and continue upgrades and maintenance to existing park facilities, particularly neighborhood scale parks as detailed in the Recreation, Park, and Open Space Master Plan, neighborhood, or district plans. Capital improvement Parks & Recreation City Manager's Office Planning & Development Services Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  5.12 Conduct community-wide parks and recreation needs assessments and pursue recommended improvements. Evaluate facilities and programs provided by the Parks and Recreation Department through community surveys at least every five years. Pursue new programs, physical and operational improvements, and evaluate ongoing priorities to implement the needs assessment for park facilities and recreational programs. Project / program Parks & Recreation City Manager's Office Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  5.13 Identify a land acquisition strategy and integrate additional greenspace. Establish a platform to provide a required and desirable amount of land per citizen, as discussed within the planning considerations. Policy-based decision Parks & Recreation City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects Planning & Development Services City of Bryan Brazos County Texas A&M University Public-private partnerships  5.14 Create connections between key elements of the parks, recreation, greenways systems, and destinations. As described in the Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan and the Recreation, Park, and Open Space Master Plan, prioritize opportunities to connect parks, greenways, community facilities, and other destinations. Policy-based decision Parks & Recreation Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects Public Works Property owners / developers  5.15 Design and construct inclusive, accessible, and sustainable parks and greenway trails. Consider all citizens’ needs and provide a diverse range of facilities and amenities to accommodate a variety of experiences and ways of interacting with the world. Encourage developments that are oriented towards and designed for accessibility to parks and greenway trails. Capital improvement Parks & Recreation Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects Public Works Property owners / developers  Page 257 of 310 ACTION NUMBER2021 UPDATE ACTION ITEM TASK TYPE CITY - RESPONSIBLE PARTY PARTNERS - INTERNAL PARTNERS - EXTERNAL FUNDING SOURCES CITY / DEPT. BUDGETSCIP BUDGETOTHER GOV’TSGRANTSPRIVATE / OTHER6.1 Implement complete street and context sensitive design. Amend the street cross sections and update the Unified Development Ordinance, the Bryan-College Station Unified Design Guidelines, and the City’s capital improvement process to implement context sensitive and complete street design such as prioritized mode corridors, reconstruction projects in established neighborhoods, and in areas where right-of-way is constrained. Regulation Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects Public Works City of Bryan Brazos County B/CS Association of Realtors B/CS Home Builders Association Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  6.2 Conduct a Thoroughfare Plan audit. Consider alternatives to relieve congestion anticipated with long term growth and evaluate adjustments to the Thoroughfare Plan based on existing street context. Project / program Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects Public Works  6.3 Enhance and upgrade intersections. Improve multimodal efficiency through roundabouts and protected intersections to improve safety and reduce congestion. Capital improvement Capital Improvement Projects Public Works City Manager's Office Planning & Development Services B/CS Metropolitan Planning Organization Texas Dept of Transportation  6.4 Continue to evaluate and implement best management practices to increase bicycle and pedestrian use. Build on the existing network of infrastructure to increase safety and comfort for all users such as separated bike lanes and shared use paths.  Capital improvement Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects Public Works Parks & Recreation  6.5 Undertake streetscape improvements within gateways and image corridors. Identify locations and implement targeted infrastructure and streetscape improvements (perhaps through partnerships) to improve aesthetics. Consider operation and maintenance costs when identifying appropriate improvements. Capital improvement Capital Improvement Projects City Manager's Office Planning & Development Services Public Works Texas A&M University Texas Dept of Transportation  6.6 Evaluate transit funding partnerships. To prepare for reductions in Federal transit funding from the region’s growth, the City should explore regional partnerships to maintain and improve transit services. Transit services should link activity centers, major employers, dense residential areas, concentrations of student housing, and provide access for underserved populations and the general public. Policy-based decision Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects Public Works B/CS Metropolitan Planning Organization City of Bryan Brazos County Brazos Transit District Brazos County Regional Mobility Authority Brazos Valley Council of Governments Texas A&M University Texas Central Texas Dept of Transportation  6.7 Prioritize programs and improvements that will reduce vehicular demand. Consider an emphasis on bicycle and pedestrian facilities, transit services, parking and other programs that can reduce vehicular demand, particularly in areas adjacent to campus. Project / program Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects Public Works B/CS Metropolitan Planning Organization Brazos County Regional Mobility Authority Brazos Valley Council of Governments Texas A&M University Texas Dept of Transportation Brazos Transit District  6.8 Maintain the various funding programs for mobility projects. These include the Bryan-College Station Metropolitan Planning Organization Transportation Improvement Program, the Brazos County Regional Mobility Authority, and the City’s capital improvements program. Policy-based decision City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects Planning & Development Services Public Works B/CS Metropolitan Planning Organization Brazos County Regional Mobility Authority  Page 258 of 310 ACTION NUMBER2021 UPDATE ACTION ITEM TASK TYPE CITY - RESPONSIBLE PARTY PARTNERS - INTERNAL PARTNERS - EXTERNAL FUNDING SOURCES CITY / DEPT. BUDGETSCIP BUDGETOTHER GOV’TSGRANTSPRIVATE / OTHER6.9 Fund bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure and safety improvements. Dedicate funding for system improvements and maintain collaborative partnerships as detailed in the Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways Master Plan. Policy-based decision City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects Planning & Development Services Public Works Parks and Recreation B/CS Metropolitan Planning Organization Brazos County Regional Mobility Authority Texas Dept of Transportation  6.10 Develop performance measures, collect transportation data, and monitor trends. Performance measures will help evaluate the effectiveness of the mobility system. Data to be collected could include traffic volumes, levels of service, vehicle miles traveled, transit ridership, pedestrian and bicycle facility usage, and safety data on vehicle crashes and those involving bicyclists or pedestrians. This data will also help to target future improvements. Project / program Planning & Development Services Public Works B/CS Metropolitan Planning Organization Brazos County Regional Mobility Authority Brazos Valley Council of Governments Texas A&M University Texas Dept of Transportation Brazos Transit District  6.11 Evaluate Traffic Impact Analysis (TIA) requirements. Consider updates to the traffic mitigation thresholds for intersections impacted by new development. The requirements could also be amended to address internal site elements such as circulation, queueing, connectivity, as well as bicycle/pedestrian infrastructure. Regulation Planning & Development Services Public Works City of Bryan B/CS Association of Realtors Property owners / developers  6.12 Evaluate and update access management strategies. Coordinate with the Bryan-College Station Metropolitan Planning Organization to align regional standards along thoroughfares to preserve modal efficiency throughout the street network. Regulation Planning & Development Services Capital Improvement Projects Public Works City of Bryan B/CS Metropolitan Planning Organization  6.13 Develop and implement a travel demand management program. Build upon existing services and including real-time traffic information, traffic incident alerts, ridesharing programs, promotion of flexible work schedules, and encouragement of dense mixed-use development in strategic areas. Project / program Planning & Development Services Public Works Capital Improvement Projects Community Services B/CS Metropolitan Planning Organization Brazos County Regional Mobility Authority Brazos Transit District Brazos Valley Council of Governments Texas A&M University Texas Dept of Transportation  7.1 Prioritize utility and service improvements in existing areas. Invest in infrastructure rehabilitation within the City’s older areas to maintain their viability and attractiveness and encourage infill and redevelopment where appropriate. Capital improvement City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects CSU - Electric CSU - Water Services Planning & Development Services Property owners / developers  7.2 Develop a comprehensive facilities plan. The plan should meet the future space and functional needs of City employees, services, and the community. Focused planning effort City Manager's Office Public Works Planning & Development Services  7.3 Continue capitalizing on opportunities to achieve multiple community objectives through coordinated infrastructure projects. Incorporate a measure in the Capital Improvements Program to weigh projects that achieve multiple objectives. Examples of coordinated infrastructure projects include road improvements, utility and drainage upgrades, sidewalk rehabilitation / installation / extensions, and streetscape enhancement. Capital improvement Capital Improvement Projects City Manager's Office CSU - Electric CSU - Water Services Planning & Development Services Public Works Texas Dept of Transportation Texas A&M University City of Bryan Brazos County Other utility providers and special districts  7.4 Continue to build resiliency in municipal operations and services. Ensure operations and services are resilient and adaptable to unforeseen circumstances, such as disaster or pandemic, and able to continuously meet community needs. Consider updating provisions in city plans and policies and develop incentive programs to better prepare for and adapt to abrupt changes or strained circumstances while simultaneously allowing for action in the face of uncertainty or unforeseen events. Policy-based decision City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects CSU - Electric CSU - Water Services Fire - Emergency Management Fire - Emergency Medical Services Fiscal Services Planning & Development Services Police Public Works Brazos Community Emergency Operations Center Brazos County City of Bryan Texas A&M University  Page 259 of 310 ACTION NUMBER2021 UPDATE ACTION ITEM TASK TYPE CITY - RESPONSIBLE PARTY PARTNERS - INTERNAL PARTNERS - EXTERNAL FUNDING SOURCES CITY / DEPT. BUDGETSCIP BUDGETOTHER GOV’TSGRANTSPRIVATE / OTHER7.5 Evaluate the utilization of community paramedicine. Partner with regional health care providers and social services to evaluate community paramedicine. This is an emerging field that uses a comprehensive approach and integrated deployment model to connect underserved populations to underutilized medical, social, and safety services, helping to decrease strain on emergency rooms, hospitals, and first responders such as EMS, fire, and police. Policy-based decision Fire - Emergency Medical Services City Manager's Office Police Department Regional healthcare providers Community service organizations and non-profits  7.6 Continue to pursue recognition, credentials, and accreditations City-wide. Continue to obtain national recognition for outstanding and innovative service in police, fire, emergency medical services (EMS), public safety communications, parks, water, public works, planning, and other areas. Policy-based decision City Manager's Office CSU - Electric CSU - Water Services Fire Fire - Emergency Medical Services Parks & Recreation Planning & Development Services Police Public Works Third-party accreditation organizations State/federal agencies  7.7 Continue to sustain and grow emergency management preparedness. In coordination with Brazos Community Emergency Operations Center and other regional partners, sustain and enhance emergency management efforts, partnerships, and funding levels to provide adequate resources, planning efforts, educational training, and appropriate technology to proactively plan for, respond to, and recover from emergency situations and disasters. Policy-based decision Fire - Emergency Management City Manager's Office Information Technology Public Works CSU - Electric CSU - Water Services Planning & Development Services Brazos Community Emergency Operations Center Brazos County City of Bryan Texas A&M University Federal / state grants  7.8 Continue using business intelligence, data analytics, and data visualization tools. Utilize data and business intelligence solutions to inform policy decisions and provide efficient municipal services. Project / program Information Technology City Manager's Office CSU - Electric CSU - Water Services Community Services Finance Fire Planning & Development Services Public Works Police  7.9 Continue to expand wi-fi to public buildings. Expand existing public wi-fi services to additional facilities and consider partnership opportunities to establish a city-wide wi-fi network. Capital improvement Information Technology City Manager's Office Public Works  7.10 Update public service plans. Continue to re-evaluate and update key public service master plans (water, wastewater, stormwater, drainage management, solid waste, electric, police, fire, EMS) on regular cycles or when necessary based on changing conditions. Ensure that these plans reflect long-term growth forecasts and support priority growth areas. Focused planning effort City Manager's Office CSU - Electric CSU - Water Services Community Services Fire Parks & Recreation Planning & Development Services Public Works Police  7.11 Utilize municipal service cost-benefit assessments in planning utility expansion. The City should focus on areas that can be reliably and economically served within the City’s capabilities. Consider an analysis of cost versus benefit when evaluating potential development agreements, municipal utility districts (MUDs) or annexation petitions. Policy-based decision City Manager's Office Fiscal Services CSU - Water Services CSU - Electric Legal Public Works Planning & Development Services  Page 260 of 310 ACTION NUMBER2021 UPDATE ACTION ITEM TASK TYPE CITY - RESPONSIBLE PARTY PARTNERS - INTERNAL PARTNERS - EXTERNAL FUNDING SOURCES CITY / DEPT. BUDGETSCIP BUDGETOTHER GOV’TSGRANTSPRIVATE / OTHER7.12 Evaluate ways to reduce energy consumption. Implement energy and resource conservation strategies in City facilities and all areas of municipal service provision.  Project / program CSU - Electric City Manager's Office Public Works  7.13 Pursue and support local water conservation and reuse initiatives. Utilize reclaimed and/ or nonpotable water to irrigate City facilities where feasible. Project / program CSU - Water Services City Manager's Office Texas A&M University Texas Commission on Environmental Quality  7.14 Continue outreach and educational programs to reduce resource consumption. Encourage residents, businesses, and local institutions to participate in solid waste reduction and recycling, energy efficiency, and water conservation programs. Create publicity campaigns to highlight the City’s sustainability and resiliency efforts within public facilities. Project / program CSU - Electric CSU - Water Services Public Works - Solid Waste & Recycling Services Public Communications Texas A&M University Texas Commission on Environmental Quality  7.15 Continue to implement best practices in meeting or exceeding State and Federal standards for stormwater management. Implement the City’s Stormwater Management Program (SWMP) in accordance with State requirements of the TPDES Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems (MS4) program to manage stormwater discharges to protect, preserve and improve area streams and waterways. Consider updates to better protect area creeks and bodies of water from the impacts of urban runoff. Regulation Planning & Development Services CSU - Water Services Public Works - Drainage Maintenance Texas A&M University Texas Commission on Environmental Quality State/federal agencies  7.16 Advance sound floodplain management practices. Reduce the risk and impacts of flooding, adhere to higher development standards, and limit long-term infrastructure costs through continued implementation and refinement of the City’s Flood Ordinance (including No Adverse Impacts) and participation in FEMA’s Community Rating System (CRS) program. Regulation Planning & Development Services CSU - Water Services Texas Commission on Environmental Quality State/federal agencies  7.17 Continue to meet or exceed State and Federal water quality standards for drinking water sources. Continue phased expansion of water supply resources and associated production capabilities to meet shorter-term peak demands, as well as forecasted longer- term needs. Regulation CSU - Water Services City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects Texas Commission on Environmental Quality State/federal agencies  7.18 Continue to keep wastewater collection and treatment capacities ahead of demand. Continue phased expansion of the existing wastewater system to comply with all regulatory permits, standards, and requirements that meet shorter-term peak demands, as well as forecasted longer-term needs. Regulation CSU - Water Services City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects Texas Commission on Environmental Quality State/federal agencies  7.19 Continue coordinated electric planning along with area partners. Ensure adequate and reliable supply to serve anticipated growth and maintain College Station Utilities’ capability for rapid response to system outages. Regulation CSU - Electric City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects Electric Reliability Council of Texas Other utility providers and special districts State/federal agencies  7.20 Design high-quality public facilities that reflect the character of their surroundings. Ensure these buildings, facilities and improvements blend into existing areas and help establish an identity and quality standard for newly developing or redeveloping areas of the City. Capital improvement Capital Improvement Projects City Manager's Office Planning & Development Services  7.21 Design City facilities and infrastructure to incorporate sustainable and resilient practices. Consider design features such as stormwater management, water conservation and reuse, native or adapted plantings, or building design features that conserve energy and natural resources. Capital improvement Capital Improvement Projects City Manager's Office CSU - Water Services CSU - Electric Planning & Development Services Public Works Design consultants  7.22 Provide public safety facilities to maintain adequate service and response times. Monitor response times and safety service needs as growth occurs; use data and national standards to make decisions about service investments. Policy-based decision Fire Police City Manager's Office  Page 261 of 310 ACTION NUMBER2021 UPDATE ACTION ITEM TASK TYPE CITY - RESPONSIBLE PARTY PARTNERS - INTERNAL PARTNERS - EXTERNAL FUNDING SOURCES CITY / DEPT. BUDGETSCIP BUDGETOTHER GOV’TSGRANTSPRIVATE / OTHER8.1 Prioritize proactive infrastructure investments and programs in strategic redevelopment and infill areas. Invest in the necessary infrastructure to increase redevelopment potential or to catalyze redevelopment activity in areas identified in the Future Land Use & Character Map or in district plans. Concentrating development and services within target areas promotes efficient use of infrastructure and supports environmental resiliency goals. Policy-based decision Planning & Development Services Capital Improvement Projects City Manger's Office Community Services CSU - Electric CSU - Water Services Economic Development & Tourism Public Works Property owners / developers  8.2 Amend the zoning map and consider regulatory incentives to encourage infill and redevelopment. Apply targeted zoning strategies in designated Redevelopment Areas identified on the Future Land Use & Character Map. Review the effectiveness of the Redevelopment District (RDD) overlay zoning and consider updating provisions in the Unified Development Ordinance to incentivize infill and redevelopment. Regulation Planning & Development Services Economic Development & Tourism B/CS Realtors Association B/CS Home Builders Association Neighborhood / Homeowner Associations Property owners / developers  8.3 Re-envision underutilized retail uses and incentivize redevelopment and/or reuse of vacant buildings and properties. Monitor national trends in the evolving retail sector or other sectors and continue to seek redevelopment and revitalization opportunities for vacant or underutilized sites, particularly large retail and big-box sites. Policy-based decision Economic Development & Tourism Planning & Development Services B/CS Realtors Association Property owners / developers  8.4 Evaluate the utilization of impact fees that provide revenues to support infrastructure demands. Consider the need to amend impact fees to promote the city’s long-term fiscal strength. Policy-based decision City Manager's Office CSU - Water Services Planning & Development Services  8.5 Evaluate and revise the Water/Sanitary Sewer Extension Policy. Evaluate the City’s service area for sanitary sewer (the Certificate of Convenience and Necessity boundary) and extend into the Extraterritorial Jurisdiction in an incremental and carefully timed manner when it meets defined growth management objectives. Ensure that extensions to water/ sewer utilities and service areas are consistent with the Future Land Use & Character Map, the City’s utility master plans, and the multi-year Capital Improvement Plan. Policy-based decision City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects CSU - Water Services Planning & Development Services  8.6 Conduct fiscal impact analyses. Analyze development patterns at a City-wide level to determine the true costs associated with various development types, including unfunded service costs, to provide decision makers with the best available information to ensure the City’s long-term fiscal sustainability. In addition, utilize financial modeling to evaluate the cost-to-serve for annexation requests, MUDs, and development agreement areas. Policy-based decision City Manager's Office Fiscal Services Planning & Development Services Capital Improvement Projects CSU - Water Services CSU - Electric Public Works  8.7 Continue the City’s Oversize Participation practice, where appropriate. Continue providing funds for potential oversize participation to reduce future infrastructure costs. Policy-based decision City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects CSU - Water Services CSU - Electric Planning & Development Services Property owners / developers  8.8 Use available tools to strategically manage growth pressure in the ETJ. Utilize development agreements and Municipal Utility Districts (MUDs) to manage growth pressure in areas where annexation is not feasible. Policy-based decision City Manager's Office Capital Improvement Projects CSU - Water Services CSU - Electric Legal Planning & Development Services Property owners / developers  Page 262 of 310 ACTION NUMBER2021 UPDATE ACTION ITEM TASK TYPE CITY - RESPONSIBLE PARTY PARTNERS - INTERNAL PARTNERS - EXTERNAL FUNDING SOURCES CITY / DEPT. BUDGETSCIP BUDGETOTHER GOV’TSGRANTSPRIVATE / OTHER9.1 Reference the Comprehensive Plan actions within City master plans. City master plans are components of the Comprehensive Plan. Master plans should be updated on a regular cycle (or as needed). The updates should include provisions that relate directly to actions within the Comprehensive Plan and the Future Land Use & Character Map. Project / Program Planning & Development Services CSU - Water Services CSU - Electric Economic Development & Tourism Parks & Recreation  9.2 Reference the Comprehensive Plan and City master plans in Capital Improvements Planning, departmental work programs, and budgeting processes. Alignment with the City’s long-term plans should be among the criteria for evaluating potential capital or operating expenditures. Policy-based decision City Manager's Office All departments: CSU - Electric CSU - Water Services Community Services Economic Development & Tourism Fire Fiscal Services Human Resources Information Technology Legal Neighborhood Services Parks & Recreation Planning & Development Services Police Public Communications Public Works  9.3 Establish a university/city annual agenda. Conduct an annual meeting between leadership of the City and Texas A&M University to reflect on the previous year’s successes and challenges and to establish a collaborative agenda for the next 12 months. The intention of the agenda created is to strengthen both partners in a way that student success and faculty/staff retention is also improved. Participants would be from the highest leadership levels of Texas A&M University and the City and mutually committed to a best-in-class town-gown relationship. Policy-based decision City Manager's Office Texas A&M University leadership  9.4 Gather growth expectations. Work with Texas A&M University and other higher education institutions concerning their projected enrollment growth and associated faculty/staff increases to plan effectively for the implications of further off-campus housing demand. Project / program Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office Texas A&M University  9.5 Formalize ongoing collaborations and establish a planning coordination task force with Texas A&M University and the City. Continue to coordinate with Texas A&M University regarding the benefits and impacts of university development projects and support ongoing efforts to provide harmonious transitions between the campus and the surrounding area. These meetings should continue to take place regularly. Policy-based decision City Manager's Office Planning & Development Services Community Services Texas A&M University  9.6 Continue “good neighbor” initiatives with Texas A&M for permanent and temporary residents. Build upon existing programs to promote positive living experiences for students and long-term residents in city neighborhoods. Activities could include community discussions, a lecture series, door-to-door visits, or neighborhood gatherings. The activities would raise awareness about ordinances, positively communicate neighborhood norms, promote social interaction, and demonstrate what it means to be a “good neighbor.” Project / program Community Services Neighborhood Services City Manager's Office Texas A&M University  9.7 Contribute to a joint branding effort with Texas A&M University. Continue to work with Texas A&M University to define and promote a stronger and more unified brand identity. This includes not only graphics but, more importantly, the underlying messages and strategies to share the brand work. Project / program Economic Development & Tourism Public Communications Texas A&M University  9.8 Expand tourism opportunities with Texas A&M University. Expand partnerships with Texas A&M University to recruit, create, and magnify tourism opportunities at university facilities and beyond. Project / program Economic Development & Tourism Public Communications Texas A&M University  Page 263 of 310 ACTION NUMBER2021 UPDATE ACTION ITEM TASK TYPE CITY - RESPONSIBLE PARTY PARTNERS - INTERNAL PARTNERS - EXTERNAL FUNDING SOURCES CITY / DEPT. BUDGETSCIP BUDGETOTHER GOV’TSGRANTSPRIVATE / OTHER9.9 Pursue partnerships with Texas A&M University regarding environmental stewardship. Encourage collaborations with academic departments, institutes, and operational units to capitalize on university research and expertise and help raise awareness of environmental stewardship and sustainable practices within the community.  Policy-based decision City Manager's Office CSU - Water Services Parks & Recreation Planning & Development Services Public Works - Solid Waste & Recycling Services Texas A&M University  9.10 Convene coordination meetings with neighboring jurisdictions and regional planning organizations. Participate in collaborative efforts, such as the Intergovernmental Committee and others, on land use, infrastructure, facilities planning, and other planning issues of mutual interest. Seek opportunities to align policies or share services to create a stronger region and more efficiently utilize resources. Policy-based decision City Manager's Office CSU - Electric CSU - Water Services Community Services Planning & Development Services Public Works City of Bryan Texas A&M University Brazos, Burleson, & Grimes Counties B/CS Metropolitan Planning Organization Brazos County Regional Mobility Authority Brazos Valley Council of Governments Texas Dept of Transportation  9.11 Pursue interlocal cooperation agreements. Pursue and maintain beneficial agreements with Brazos, Grimes, and Burleson counties, City of Bryan, Texas A&M University, and other service providers, as appropriate. Such agreements can address coordination of subdivision review, thoroughfare planning, floodplain management, and utility and other service provision, among other matters of mutual interest. Policy-based decision City Manager's Office CSU - Electric CSU - Water Services Planning & Development Services City of Bryan Texas A&M University Brazos, Burleson, & Grimes Counties  9.12 Continue to coordinate with the College Station Independent School District and public charter schools. Coordination should address facility needs and projections, potential locations for new schools or future use of existing schools, infrastructure impacts of school development, and ensuring safe/walkable areas around schools. Policy-based decision City Manager's Office Planning & Development Services Capital Improvement Projects Public Works College Station Independent School District Public charter schools  9.13 Continue to participate in regional mobility initiatives. Partner with the Bryan-College Station Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), the Brazos County Regional Mobility Authority (RMA), Brazos Valley Council of Governments (BVCOG), Texas A&M University, Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), Brazos Transit District, Interstate 14 and Loop 214, Easterwood Airport flight network expansion, Texas High Speed Rail Initiative, freight transport, and Union Pacific on initiatives such as the Brazos Yard and quiet zones. Policy-based decision Planning & Development Services City Manager's Office Public Works B/CS Metropolitan Planning Organization Brazos County Regional Mobility Authority Brazos Valley Council of Governments Texas A&M University Texas Dept of Transportation Brazos Transit District Easterwood Airport Texas High Speed Rail Initiative Union Pacific  Page 264 of 310 171CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Plan Amendment Process The Comprehensive Plan is meant to be a living document allowing for adjustment to changing conditions over time. Shifts in political, economic, physical, technological, and social conditions, and other unforeseen circumstances, may influence and change the priorities and fiscal outlook of the community. As the City grows and evolves new issues will emerge while others no longer remain relevant. Some action recommendations will be found impractical or outdated while other plausible solutions will arise. To ensure that the plan continues to reflect the overall goals of the community and remains relevant and useful over time the City must regularly revisit the plan and maintain ongoing interaction with residents and other stakeholders. Continuous monitoring and periodic review activities, as outlined in this section, are intended to confirm that the plan’s goals and action recommendations remain appropriate and that public ownership and support of the plan remains strong. Two types of revisions to the Comprehensive Plan may occur: (1) minor amendments, and (2) major updates. Minor amendments may be proposed at any time such as specific adjustments to the future land use and/or thoroughfare plans related to particular land development applications or public improvement projects. If not pressing, minor amendments can be documented and compiled for the annual plan review process and updated at that time. For example, this is how and when the results of another specialized plan or study could be incorporated into relevant sections of the Comprehensive Plan. More significant plan modifications and updates should occur every five years at most. Major updates may involve reviewing the base conditions, anticipated growth trends, goals and action recommendations in the plan. Furthermore, adding, revising, or removing action statements in the plan may be necessary depending on implementation progress. ANNUAL REPORT The Planning and Zoning Commission and City staff shall prepare an annual progress report for presentation to the City Council. This ensures that the plan is consistently reviewed and that any needed modifications are identified for the annual minor amendment process. Consistent assessment of the relationship between the plan, the City’s implementing ordinances, and regulations is an essential part of this effort. The Annual Report should include: • Significant actions and accomplishments during the past year • The implementation status of actions within the plan • Obstacles or problems in plan implementation, including those encountered in administering the land use and transportation aspects, as well as any other strategies of the plan • Proposed amendments that have come forward during the course of the year, which may include revisions to the individual plan maps or text changes • Recommendations for needed actions, programs, projects, and procedures to be developed and implemented in the coming year Page 265 of 310 172CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN INTERIM AMENDMENTS As noted above, minor plan amendments can be adopted after appropriate review (especially if related to a pending land development application) or deferred for the annual plan review process. In either case, when considering an amendment, the City should ensure the proposed amendment is consistent with the goals and actions set forth in the plan regarding character protection, development compatibility, infrastructure availability, conservation of environmentally sensitive areas, and other community priorities. Careful consideration should also be given to guard against site specific changes that could negatively impact adjacent areas or detract from the overall character of the area. Factors worthy of consideration when deciding on a proposed amendment include, but are not limited to: • Consistency with and contribution to the overall direction and character of the community as captured in the plan’s vision, goals, and actions • Compliance with the Future Land Use & Character Map and/or Thoroughfare Plan • Compatibility with the surrounding area • Impacts on infrastructure including water, wastewater, drainage, and the transportation network • Impact on the City’s ability to provide, fund, and maintain services • Impact on environmentally sensitive and natural areas Page 266 of 310 173CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FIVE-YEAR EVALUATION AND APPRAISAL An evaluation and appraisal report should be prepared every five years by City staff with input from various departments, the Planning and Zoning Commission, and any other appropriate boards and commissions. The evaluation process is to identify the successes and shortcomings of the plan in achieving the community’s goals, consider changing conditions, and recommend appropriate modifications as needed. The report should review the basic conditions and assumptions about trends and growth indicators. It should also evaluate implementation potential and/or obstacles related to any unmet goals or action recommendations. The evaluation report and process should result in an amended Comprehensive Plan including an assessment of any new information which led to updating any of the goals, strategies, and/or action recommendations. Specifically, the report should include, identify, or evaluate the following: (1) Summarize major actions and interim plan amendments undertaken over the last five years (2) Update the assumptions, trends, and base studies data including the following: • The rate at which growth and development is occurring relative to the projections put forward in the plan • Shifts in demographics and other growth trends • The area of land that is designated and zoned for intense development and its capacity to meet projected demands and needs • City-wide attitudes and whether apparent shifts necessitate amendments to the stated goals or strategies, and • Changes in political, social, economic, technological or environmental conditions, or other unforeseen circumstances or issues that indicate a need for amendments. (3) Update goals, actions, or narrative as needed to ensure progress toward achieving the community’s goals, including: • Review the action plan to ensure timely accomplishment of the plan’s recommended actions • Re-evaluate or revise items not completed to ensure their continued relevance • Review priorities as conditions change; some actions may emerge as a higher priority given new or changed circumstances while others may become less important to achieving the goals and development objectives of the community • Identify conflicts between goals or strategies that have been discovered and provide recommended revisions • Assess changes in laws and practices that may impact the ability of the community to achieve its goals and suggest revisions in strategies or priorities as needed Page 267 of 310 174CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Thank you to the following individuals and groups who contributed to the preparation of this Comprehensive Plan and its 10-year update. Contributors to the 10-Year Update: COMPREHENSIVE PLAN EVALUATION COMMITTEE Brian Bochner Brad Brimley Michael Buckley Clint Cooper Elizabeth Cunha Shana Elliott Joe Guerra Lisa Halperin Linda Harvell Dennis Maloney John Nichols Jeremy Osborne Julie Schulz CITY COUNCIL Karl Mooney, Mayor Bob Brick, Place 1 John Crompton, Place 2 Linda Harvell, Place 3 Elizabeth Cunha, Place 4 John Nichols, Place 5 Dennis Maloney, Place 6 PLANNING & ZONING COMMISSION Dennis Christiansen, Chair Jason Cornelius Joe Guerra Bill Mather Bobby Mirza Jeremy Osborne William Wright Acknowledgements Page 268 of 310 175CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN ADMINISTRATION Bryan Woods, City Manager Jeff Capps, Deputy City Manager Jeff Kersten, Assistant City Manager Jennifer Prochazka, Assistant City Manager PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT SERVICES Michael Ostrowski, CEcD, AICP, Director of Planning & Development Services Molly Hitchcock, AICP, Assistant Director of Planning & Development Services Alyssa Halle-Schramm, AICP, LEED GA, Long Range Planning Administrator – Project Manager Amy Albright, Staff Planner Anthony Armstrong, P.E., Engineering Services & Construction Inspections Manager Matheus Bechtlufft Cardoso, Planning Intern Brian Binford, CBO, Building Official Erika Bridges, P.E., Assistant City Engineer Jade Broadnax, AICP Candidate, Staff Planner Carol Cotter, P.E., City Engineer Crystal Fails, Staff Assistant Jesse DiMeolo, Staff Planner Matthew Ellis, Planning Intern Venessa Garza, AICP, Bicycle, Pedestrian, & Greenways Planning Administrator Bridgette George, Development Services Administration Manager Kristen Hejny, Administrative Support Specialist Rachel Lazo, Senior Planner Brandon Leaver, GIS Technician Robin Macias, Planning Technician Jason Schubert, AICP, Transportation Planning Coordinator Julie Svetlik, GIS Analyst Brandi Tedrick, Staff Planner Derrick Williams, Staff Planner Page 269 of 310 176CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN STAFF RESOURCE TEAM Caroline Ask, Public Works Solid Waste Division Manager Peter Caler, Assistant Director of Public Works Esmerelda Casas, Neighborhood & Community Relations Coordinator Billy Couch, Police Chief Timothy Crabb, Director of Electric Utility Debbie Eller, Director of Community Services Emily Fisher, Director of Capital Projects Isaias Hernandez, Communications Services Coordinator Kelly Kelbly, Assistant Director of Parks & Recreation Mary Ellen Leonard, Director of Fiscal Services Lacey Lively, Marketing Manager Stephen Maldonado Jr., P.E., Assistant Director of Water Services Richard Mann, Fire Chief Stuart Marrs, Fire Accreditation Manager Rachel Mayor, Multimedia Coordinator Tradd Mills, Emergency Management Coordinator Gary Mechler, Director of Water Services Barbara Moore, Assistant to the City Manager Aubrey Nettles, Economic Development Manager Brian Piscacek, Assistant to the City Manager Sam Rivera, Assistant Director of IT Carla Robinson, City Attorney Gustavo Roman, Assistant Director of Community Services Troy Rother, Senior EngineernII Traffic Engineering Natalie Ruiz, Director of Economic Development Beatrice Saba, Director of BCS Library System Jay Socol, Director of Public Communications Leslie Whitten, Assistant City Attorney Steve Wright, Director of Parks & Recreation CONSULTANTS Planning NEXT Kimley-Horn & Associates Page 270 of 310 177CSTX.GOV | COLLEGE STATION COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Contributors to the 2009 Comprehensive Plan COMPREHENSIVE PLAN ADVISORY COMMITTEE Bill Davis, Steve Arden, Gary Arnold, Brian Bochner, Chad Bohne, Millie Burell, Andrew Burleson, Kristina Cambell, Jerry Cooper, Laurie Corbelli, Dennis Corrington, Clark Ealy, Keith Ellis, Tedi Ellison, Gary Erwin, Michael Guido, Lindsey Guindi, Craig Hall, David Hart, Larry Haskins, Randy Haynes, Steve Hodge, Kathleen Ireland, Kim Jacobs, Hillary Jessup, Linda LaSut, Hugh Lindsay, Margie Lucas, Bianca Manago, Larry Marriott, Chuck Martinez, Bo Miles, Colleen Netterville, Michael Parks, Andrew Pittz, Douglas Rapé, John Richards, Dorthea Robinson, Richard Startzman, Tom Taylor, Gary Teston, Jodi Warner, Lloyd Wassermann, Rodney Weis, Adrian Williams CITY COUNCIL Ben White, John Crompton, James Massey, Dennis Maloney, Lynn McIlhaney, David Ruesink, Lawrence Stewart PLANNING & ZONING COMMISSION John Nichols, Noel Bauman, Winnie Garner, Paul Greer, Doug Slack, Hugh Stearns, Thomas Woodfin FORMER CITY COUNCIL AND PLANNING & ZONING COMMISSION Ron Silvia, John Happ, Ron Gay, Chris Scotti, Dennis Christiansen, Bill Davis, Derek Dictson, Marsha Sanford, Glenn Schroeder, Harold Strong ADMINISTRATION Glenn Brown, Terry Childers, Kathy Merrill, David Neely CITY STAFF Beth Boerboom, Erika Bridges, Brittany Caldwell, Amber Carter, Carol Cotter, Bob Cowell, Bridgette George, Venessa Garza, Joe Guerra, Alan Gibbs, Crissy Hartl, Matthew Hilgemeier, Molly Hitchcock, Lauren Hovde, Lindsay Kramer, Barbara Moore, Josh Norton, Nicole Padilla, Jennifer Prochazka, Matthew Robinson, Lance Simms, Jason Schubert, Michael Trevino STAFF RESOURCE TEAM Robert Alley, Jeff Capps, Harvey Cargill, Marco Cisneros, David Coleman, Debbie Eller, Chuck Gilman, David Gwin, Eric Hurt, Michael Ikner, Larry Johnson, Jeff Kersten, Jon Mies, Tony Michalsky, Mary Anne Powell, Carla Robinson, Ben Roper, David Schmitz, Mark Smith, Wally Urrutia CONSULTANTS Kendig Keast Collaborative Kimley-Horn & Associates Alliance Transportation Group CDS Market Research Mitchell & Morgan Page 271 of 310 cstx.gov/CompPlan Page 272 of 310 BRYAN TEXASAVS GEORGEBUSHDRTE X A S A V WE L L B O R N R DUNIVERSITY DRHARVEYMITCHELLPWSVIC T O R I A A V E29THST W ELSHAV W IL L IA M D F ITC H P WLINCOLN AVHOLLEMANDRBARRONRDUNIVERSITYDREBOONVILLE RD SOUTHWESTPW N H A R V E Y M I T C H E L L P W STEXASAV HARVEYRDEVILLAMARIARDWVILLAMARIARDFM 2 1 5 4TARROW ST HOLLEM A N DRECAVITT A V ANDERSONST HOLLEMANDRWLEONARD RDDARTMOUTH S TGROESBECKSTE A R L R U D D E R F WSBRIARCREST DRS C O LL E G E A V RAYMONDSTOTZERPWW SH21 N E A R L R U D D E R F W GEORGEBUSHDRWFINFEATHERRDROCK PRAIRIERD C A P S T O N E D R SH 6 SGREENS PRAIRIE RDFM 2 1 5 4HARV E Y MITCHELL P W S RIVERSIDE P W S H 6 S SH 30 FM158 SH 6 S WILLIAM D FITCH PWRIVERSIDEPW RAYMONDSTOTZERPWMAP 2.6 Proposed Bicycle FacilitiesMAP 5.4 G U L F S T A T E S U T I L I T I E S E A S E M E N T Multi-use Path Proposed Grade Separation Existing Grade Separation Funded Grade Separation Proposed Brazos County College Station City Limits Easterwood Airport CSISD Property Texas A&M University Property College Station Parks College Station Greenway CSISD Schools Brazos Streets Bike Route Proposed Bike Route Existing Bike Lane Funded Bike Lane Existing 0 10.5 Miles Bike Facility Proposed Multi-use Path Existing Multi-use Path Funded College Station ETJ Page 273 of 310 BRYAN G U L F S T A T E S U T I L I T I E S E A S E M E N T TEXASAVS GEORGEBUSHDRTE X A S A V WE L L B O R N R DUNIVERSITY DRHARVEYMITCHELLPWSVIC T O R I A A V E 29 THSTW ELSHAV W I L L IA MDFITCHPWLINCOLN AVHOLLEMANDRBARRONRDUNIVERSITYDREBOONVILLE RD SOUTHWESTPW N H A R V E Y M I T C H E L L P W S TEXASAV HARVEYRDWVILLAMARIARDTARROW ST HOLLEM A N DRECAVITT A V ANDERSONST HOLLEMANDRWLEONARD RDDARTMO U T H S TSOUTHWEST PW EE VILLAMARIARDE A R L R U D D E R F WSGROESBECKSTFM 2 1 5 4 S C O LL E G E A V RAYMONDSTOTZERPWW SH 21N E A R L R U D D E R F W GEORGEBUSHDRWFINFEATHERRDROCK PRAIRIERD C A P S T O N E D R SH 6 SGREENS PRAIRIE RDFM 2 1 5 4HAR V EY MITCHELL P W S RIVERSIDE PW S H 6 S SH 30 FM158 SH 6 S WILLIAM D FITCH PWRAYMONDSTOTZERPWProposed Pedestrian FacilitiesMAP 5.5 Sidewalk Existing Sidewalk Funded Sidewalk Proposed Multi-use Path Proposed Grade Separation Existing Grade Separation Funded Grade Separation Proposed Brazos County College Station City Limit Texas A&M University Property Easterwood Airport CSISD Property College Station Parks College Station Greenway CSISD Schools Brazos Streets 0 10.5 Miles College Station ETJ Multi-use Path Existing Multi-use Path Funded Page 274 of 310 TEXAS AV S SH 6 S FM 2154BARRON RDGRAHAM RDROCK PRAIRIE RDFM 2818FM 2154 S H 6 S UNIVERSITY DRGEORGE BUSH DRHARVEY RDRAYMOND STOTZER PWS H 3 0 WILLIAMDFITCHPWCity Limits ETJ Future W ater M ain Existing Water M ain Future Water System ExhibitUpdated 2021 Page 275 of 310 [Ú [Ú [Ú [Ú TEXAS AV S SH 6 S FM 2154BARRON RDGRAHAM RDROCK PRAIRIE RDFM 2818FM 2154 S H 6 S UNIVERSITY DRGEORGE BUSH DRHARVEY RDRAYMOND STOTZER PWS H 3 0 WILLIAMDFITCHPWFuture Wastewater System ExhibitUpdated 2021 City Limits ETJ Future Gravity M ain Future Force M ain Existing Gravity M ain Existing Force M ain Future L ift Station[Ú Page 276 of 310 Comprehensive Plan Public Input Online Survey, August-September 2021 SURVEY PROMPT – The proposed College Station Comprehensive Plan reflects my ideas for the future regarding: 1. How land in the city is used and developed (Chapter 2): 1- Strongly Agree 1 2- Somewhat Agree 8 3- Neutral 2 4- Somewhat Disagree 5 6- Not Applicable 1 Total 17 2. Housing options, affordability, and a variety of neighborhoods to fit all lifestyles (Chapter 3): 1- Strongly Agree 3 2- Somewhat Agree 6 3- Neutral 2 4- Somewhat Disagree 3 5- Strongly Disagree 3 6- Not Applicable 1 Total 18 3. The quality and variety of businesses in the community (Chapter 4 and the Economic Development Master Plan): 1- Strongly Agree 2 2- Somewhat Agree 8 3- Neutral 3 4- Somewhat Disagree 3 5- Strongly Disagree 1 6- Not Applicable 1 Total 18 4. Things to do in the community including parks, recreation, the arts, and entertainment (Chapter 5): 1- Strongly Agree 4 2- Somewhat Agree 4 3- Neutral 2 4- Somewhat Disagree 4 5- Strongly Disagree 2 6- Not Applicable 2 Total 18 Page 277 of 310 Comprehensive Plan Public Input Online Survey, August-September 2021 5. How to get around the City using various mobility modes including walking, biking, using transit, or driving (Chapter 6): 1- Strongly Agree 3 2- Somewhat Agree 8 4- Somewhat Disagree 3 5- Strongly Disagree 3 6- Not Applicable 1 Total 18 6. City services like law enforcement, utility provision, and libraries (Chapter 7): 1- Strongly Agree 2 2- Somewhat Agree 10 3- Neutral 5 6- Not Applicable 1 Total 18 7. The management of City growth, population density, and redevelopment (Chapter 8): 1- Strongly Agree 1 2- Somewhat Agree 5 3- Neutral 6 4- Somewhat Disagree 4 5- Strongly Disagree 1 6- Not Applicable 1 Total 18 8. The City's external partnerships including its relationship with Texas A&M University (Chapter 9): 1- Strongly Agree 2 2- Somewhat Agree 4 3- Neutral 8 4- Somewhat Disagree 1 5- Strongly Disagree 2 6- Not Applicable 1 Total 18 Page 278 of 310 Comment #Is there any additional feedback you’d like to provide regarding your answers to 1-9 above? Is anything missing from the updated Comprehensive Plan that you feel should be included?Are there any other comments you would like to provide? 1 N/A N/A Hello. Although departing from different assumptions and needs, including primarily pedagogical work. I have led for a few years various projects for BCS during my architecture studios at TAMU. More than building projects we have looked at architecture and the city as an inseparable duo. Findings and proposed projects at multiple scales–and with varying degrees of engaging scope or implementation, can be found at www.bcsagenda.info I'm sharing this in case it helps contribute to the conversation about future city projects. I would be happy to discuss further if interested. Kind regards, Marcelo López-Dinardi Assistant Professor, TAMU Architecture 2 Transportation should be highly emphasized. College Station is still a small enough city where I should be able to bike to and from any location in the city. Building protected bike lanes should be something largely focused on. N/A As a young professional, rent is very difficult to afford. As a student, it's easy to find a house to split with 4 people for $500 a person but finding a one-bedroom for under $1000 is much more difficult. High-density housing is something that I would strongly encourage. 3 More emphasis on open space. Faster completion of proposed multiuse paths. More incorporation of existing underpasses into bikeways such as putting the Bee Creek path under Southwest Parkway. Pedestrian/bike cross over highway 6 (at Wolf Pen) and other places. More duplex and multi-family development for ownership market rather than rental.N/A 4 The city of College Station needs to focus much more on the importance of walkability. Walkable neighborhoods foster healthy living and a higher quality of life, as residents will walk instead of drive to their shopping, dining, civic, fine arts, and retail locations. Specifically, having retail, grocery, and dining within a 15- minute walk from where a resident lives decreases dependency on cars and promotes healthier lifestyles. This relates to the idea of urban density as well. The mostly suburban development in College Station and indeed most of the United States has been detrimental to the health and vitality of the community. The city's current roadway system favors the automobile much more than the pedestrian. Sidewalks need to be expanded, more traffic lights should be installed, protected bike lanes should be installed, and even decreasing the number of lanes in a road (and in turn opening up to pedestrian and bicycle traffic) will greatly benefit the city. While the plan was quite comprehensive, a fine arts and cultural development and endowment plan from the city would be great. (More civic investment in museums and cultural centers) - this will make the city more attractive to tourism and will increase the city's quality of life. In the future, public transportation will need to be improved as the city gets larger and larger. This includes the further development of the city's existing bus system (bus lanes and even bus rapid transit (brt) might need to be considered as the city gets larger). Also, pedestrian and bicycle exclusive pathways and streets would be very beneficial to the vitality of College Station. I wish all of you luck in your decision- making. 5 Just As Long as all changes to this town keep the core Values of Texas A&M intact.N/A N/A 6 I like the expansion of urban center and neighborhood center areas, I just wish there was more! In terms of encouraging bike infrastructure, as a cyclist, one large part preventing cycling isn't just a lack of lanes. I would like to see the city include mandatory bike parking and bike racks for commercial areas in the parking minimums, especially in the large strip malls. Right now most of the time you need to find some sign or tree to chain your bike to. N/A 7 The ROO is not accepting of all lifestyles.N/A N/A 8 Do not annex areas that are all mobile homes. You will push people out that have nowhere to go and cant afford to live anywhere else. Im speaking of Sherwood Heights. N/A N/A Comprehensive Plan Public Input Online Survey Comments & Feedback, August-September 2021 Page 279 of 310 Comment #Is there any additional feedback you’d like to provide regarding your answers to 1-9 above? Is anything missing from the updated Comprehensive Plan that you feel should be included?Are there any other comments you would like to provide? 9 Definitely more affordable housing. There are families here not just college students. I feel there should be more family friendly and affordable activities. Neighborhood markets, flea markets for aspiring entrepreneurs, more parks with actual playgrounds for kids. There is an entire 2/3 blocks for college students to get drunk but not many things for children to do that they haven't done 100 times already. More community activities. 10 Like most residents, I would like to see more natural park areas included. Lick Creek Park should be greatly expanded as it connects with South Pointe. We need more greenways to connect parts of the city, and the greenways should not just be signs on neighborhood sidewalks. more greenways connecting parts of the city to allow residents to walk and bike. New access corridors to the Navasota river. We are growing in the direction of the river, and at some point we will need to improve access. People are just now discovering the ability to raft and kayak on the river. Our planning needs to anticipate the inclusion of the Navasota (and Brazos) in future planning. To me it is insane that no one looks to the rivers for recreation. (note that I am not a kayaker or tuber. I am way too old for that). Our urban expansion needs to preserve the Carter Creek corridor and at the same time grow the city around it. Since there is permanent water flow in the creek, it is an ideal location for walkways, wild areas, appropriate development (cafes, walking spaces, outdoor recreational facilities). A part of it should be made navigable for people wanting to go tubing or kayaking. A small lake should be created for recreation. I believe the water quality is not bad as it is effluent from tertiary sewage. CS desperately needs to include a waterway in its urban planning. Carters Creek is a jewel that should be both protected but also developed for outdoor enjoyment. It would be a significant tourist draw if we could make part of it useable for water recreation. Finally, Lick Creek is putrid for much of the year. I don't know where the pollution is coming from. The nice pond next to the greenway now is mostly dry, because the urban planners did not protect the watershed when allowing the development of the medical neighborhood south of Scott and White. Watershed protection needs to be more of a priority here in CS. 11 The city has done a good job with the City Hall development and the Century Square. -Improvements can be made in developing recreational activities and outdoor possibilities. The City should add more red and green trails on the trail development plan. -Updated fa A larger vision! Comments made by students- There is nothing to DO in College Station. There is no place to hike in College Station. They want to go to Dallas, Houston, Austin. Why? They are perceived as more upscale: shopping, venues, restaurants, green space, outdoor activities. But, what do people HATE that live in those big cities: traffic! College Station is at the perfect time to UPDATE its image. College Station already has some shopping, some venues, some restaurants, some green space, but it looks old, compared to the big cities. You would attract more students to stay if the city was updated and had more to do. SOME IDEAS: The corner of Texas Ave. and George Bush: Students would LOVE Trader Joe’s in the old World Market spot. This is a noticeable spot, near the campus, students can walk from campus and drive there from anywhere else. People see it on the way into town for games. All along Texas Ave.: Updating ALL paint, facades, landscaping along Texas Ave. as people enter the city. This would attract people to stay. Can the city incentivize businesses to do so. WHAT’s THE BUZZ coffee-this would be an EXCELLENT spot to put an outdoor area next to their building on the south side. They could add a trellis and outdoor eating/studying area with lots of trees and landscaping. The city could encourage/incentivize this type of development. This, again, is visible from Texas Ave. as people drive into town. Advertise the EDUCATIONAL opportunity for young families: Give information about the quality of local schools. Quality of life is what students may be looking for to raise families. TRAILS: Update all trails in College Station to either red or green. Blue trails are not safe. Update the parks with new signage, make sure they are mowed. Then, come up with a maroon and green and brown signage system for all trails (more updated and green colors then the red and blue signs).Create a trail guide for the city, adding these trails to the All Trails app and advertise to students and the city all there is to offer outdoors! After reading the Economic Development Plan and the Comprehension Plan- “RECRUIT AGGIE-OWNED AND LED BUSINESSES Texas A&M graduates identify strongly with College Station. Equally notable, they are creating and leading many successful businesses in Texas and throughout the country. Attention should be placed on recruiting Texas A&M led and owned businesses to their beloved alma mater. “ This vision should expand to "Texas-owned and led businesses" to be more inclusive and not limit the population of the city only to Aggies. The University does an excellent job at that. It may be that you have many parents who did not go to Texas A&M, but they sent their children here and they have a real love and investment of both time and money into this place. This is also a target group. However, they may have graduated from a variety of places. We know this to be true as we meet people from a variety of collegiate backgrounds at many community events. This will be more welcoming and will bring more businesses and employers to town. 12 I love the fact that a comprehensive plan is being refreshed. The new City Hall and Century Square are good examples of what can become a more walk/bike friendly city with amenities commensurate with residents/visitors. Trees, trees and more trees please. More walking/biking paths. Protect and expand green space to provide local destinations for those who want to get in touch with nature. Continue to improve the City's sense of place and distinction from other places. More emphasis on improved ways to purchase local produce and/or attract Trader Joe's or Sprouts Market to the area. The City should absolutely go big on protecting historical areas for the future of College Station. Reduce the reliance on TAMU references in recruiting businesses etc. There are plenty of Texas owned businesses and TAMU references imply a sense of exclusion vs inclusion. TAMU is a great institution that should stand on its own. But it's a diverse city and not everyone is an Aggie. Page 280 of 310 Comment #Is there any additional feedback you’d like to provide regarding your answers to 1-9 above? Is anything missing from the updated Comprehensive Plan that you feel should be included?Are there any other comments you would like to provide? 13 Density needs to be tied to infrastructure availability. The "Strong neighborhoods" Chapter should be named "Neighborhood Integrity". High Speed rail and the stop at Roans Prairie was not mentioned. People will need to be shuttled back and forth. If the City does not take the initiative the City of Bryan will There is not enough land in the City Limits to accommodate projected growth. The City needs to look at expanding east toward the new interstate highway. 14 I understand the growth of our city, but at what cost? You are forcing us out of our older neighborhoods. My house is paid off, I cannot afford to relocate to a NEWER residential area. I live at 308 Ash Street. There are only a very few of use still living in our homes in that area Yes! Have you considered what will happen to our 100 year old live oak trees? They will surely die when you widen Ash Street I hope y’all will really reconsider all the subcontractors you have hired to do our street improvements. The folks doing Francis Street need to be fired. They work maybe one day out of the week! You need to quit going with the lowest bidder. The contractors working off Victoria street and coachlight are just as bad. You need to have a city street Superindent on scene to make sure they are out there working to complete the roads in a timely manner 15 1) City of College Station should do more to partner with the City of Bryan, particularly when it comes to Economic Development. Its divisive competitiveness particularly when it comes to sales tax and tourism perpetuates the inequality of the region. 2) A greater emphasis on protected bicycle routes and awesome park facilities for families (not tourism) is needed. 1) College Station has a history of racial discrimination within land use policy that still impacts and shapes the city today. This history, which jncludes the establishment of College Station earliest neighborhoods with single family zoning with strong racial covenants back with the City's founding to distinguish it from the City of Bryan, is not acknowledged or addressed in this plan and the silence is deafening. Further, studies have shown that the greater percentage of a city that is zoned for single-family land uses, the less racial diversity a City has. By applying virtually only single family land uses on pretty much all the vacant land with this plan, the City may be further perpetuating its racial housing inequality issues. This is something that should be addressed in this plan. A first step would be to allow greater housing diversity in single family zoned neighborhoods - to include allowing duplexes and triplexes that fit the size and character of the surrounding neighborhoods. Another step would be to zone more vacant land as mixed residential. 2) A priority for tree lined streets is very much needed. Utility lines belong in the street in order to make this happen. We are losing our quality of life and producing undesirable streetscapes and unsustainable heat islands because undue priority is being given to easy access/maintenance of utility lines rather than the quality of life as requested by City Council. This is unaddressed in this plan as well. If other cities around the country and world have successfully integrated trees into the streetscapes, why can't College Station? N/A Page 281 of 310 Comment #:Map Name Source Category Location Comment 1 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Neighborhood Center proposed at Harvey Mitchell Pkwy near its intersection with Canyon Creek Circle This side of College Station is in dire need of student services. Grocery stores, gas stations, restaurants, etc. The traffic created by driving from this area to services elsewhere only adds to our current traffic issues. 2 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Neighborhood Center proposed at Harvey Mitchell Pkwy near its intersection with Luther St West Again, a great location for additional student services. Groceries, convenience stores, restaurants, etc. General commercial is this area. 3 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Neighborhood Center proposed at Holleman Dr South near its intersection with Cain Rd Suburban commercial focused for students and families in this area to serve, Mission Ranch, Wellborn, The Barracks and apts. 4 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Urban Residential proposed on Rosemary Lane near its intersection with George Bush Dr within the Redmond Terrace subdivision to reflect existing apartment complex development This should become neighborhood conservation. 5 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Neighborhood Commercial proposed along Tarrow St at Chimney Hill area to reflect existing commercial development Could this be upzoned to Urban? With the redevelopment of chimney hill and the adjacent Urban zoned area, I think it would make sense. The current offices and houses that that exist there have little to no character and could be redeveloped into a much more efficient use of the land. Not to mention the MASSIVE amount of parking that exists on the property that virtually never has any significant number of cars in it, haha. 6 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Suburban Residential proposed along Wolf Run off Anderson St to reflect existing single-family development Why is this suburban? 7 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Urban Residential proposed near Autumn Circle and Spring Loop Just a note to enable this type of zoning to be used to the best of its ability.... Reform parking requirements!!! ....or remove them entirely and let the developers determine what is needed based on their consumer. 8 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have concerns about this General Commercial proposed along SH 6 Frontage Road near Technology Pkwy and Woodcreek Dr, adjacent to Brookwater Circle and the Woodcreek and Amberlake subdivisions This plan will devalue my home due to the proposed change to commercial zoning of the land behind my house at 9211 Brookwater Circle, CS. There currently exists a significant natural barrier of trees and forestation between my home and the church property. Such a proposed change clearly reflects and confirms that the City of College Station values money over quality of life for neighborhoods and residents' even though the Mayor, City Council, and City Administration give 'lip service'to preserving neighborhoods and quality of residential life. I have no faith or trust in the competency of CS city planning, or other city functions related to building and land use. When the Church was built behind my house, the City permitted the church to have a retention pond and not tie into the water drainage system. I did not know that within the city limits, it was an option not to tie into the city water drainage system. The design of the retention pond, which was approved by the City, was and is (still) flawed-it does not work. I have lived at this address for 21 years (well before the church was built) with no water runoff issues. once the Church was allowed by the City to evade the City water drainage system, my property (and my neighbors properties on both sides of my home) was flooded with every rainfall. I lost 4 Oak Trees due to root rot caused by the Church's water running onto my (and my neighbors) backyards. The water runoff was so significant that the stream of water was ankle deep and had a visible current. I (and my neighbors) tried to work with the Church, which has been unresponsive. I also talked to the City department that approved the retention pond plan and was told that after the city approved the plan, it no longer had liability or responsibility for the situation. It is a violation of law as individuals (Church) cannot make changes that cause their water runoff onto any person's property. The City is responsible for this situation occurring and persisting. I lost 4 Oak Trees in my back yard due to root rot from the water runoff. Both of my neighbors also lost trees and/or had other damage caused by the Church's ill planned/constructed water plan, approved by the City of College Station. After many attempts to get the Church and City to correct this matter, I had to install a network of French drains in my back and side yard (costing me $6,000) in order to protect my property from further damage. I have deep concerns re this proposed plan for many reasons, such as change in property value to my home, reduced quality of life for myself and fellow residents on Brookwater Circle, water drainage issues, preserving trees and forestation currently along the back property line of the area you propose changing to commercial, the types of businesses that would be permitted to be built and occupied, odors (restaurants), noise level, increase of traffic congestion in neighborhood and impacting access to State Hwy 6 frontage road from Woodcreek due to increased traffic flow, cleanliness and upkeep of the property if changed to commercial, etc. I do plan to attend one of the 3 'open house' sessions listed in the document I received in the mail from the City. I would suggest that the City and Mayor need walk the walk, not just talk the talk re preserving the quality of life in neighborhoods and making College Station a city that values its residents. The construction of the three car dealerships on the frontage road have certainly impacted the quality of life for my neighbors whose homes are subjected to the car dealerships lighting. This has been a frequent topic at our HOA and other meetings. Another example of poor planning and oversight by the City of College Station and their priority of money/taxes over quality of life. I would hope that the Mayor, City Council, and City Administration learns from past mistakes so as not repeat such incidents. 9 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have concerns about this General Commercial proposed along William D Fitch Pkwy at its intersection with Victoria Ave General commercial is too wide open for this area in close proximity to SF residential. Not neighborhood friendly. Make this more restrictive and consistent with existing land uses. 10 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Suburban Residential proposed within the Creek Meadows subdivision I think it would be beneficial to the local environment to not allow subdivision homes be built on top of each other and incorporate more green space and trees. Look into road and sidewalk materials that are more permeable to reduce runoff. With more trees near homes, that will help reduce energy consumption as temperatures rise. Public Comments on the Future Land Use & Character Map Virtual Map and Open Houses, August-September 2021 Page 282 of 310 Comment #:Map Name Source Category Location Comment 11 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Suburban Residential proposed off Greens Prairie Rd near W.S. Phillips Pkwy This doubles the density 12 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Suburban Residential proposed within the Pebble Creek subdivision This doubles the density. 13 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Suburban Residential proposed within the Woodcreek subdivision This doubles the density. 14 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Suburban Residential proposed within the Castlegate II subdivision This doubles the density. 15 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Suburban Residential proposed within the Creek Meadows subdivision This doubles the density. 16 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Suburban Residential proposed southeast of Pebble Creek in the future Animate Habitat subdivision This doubles the density 17 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Urban Residential proposed near the intersection of Arrington Rd and Greens Prairie Rd The intersection of Arrington and Greens Prairie cannot support additional density. 18 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I like this Urban Center proposed on the existing Post Oak Mall site Post Oak Mall needs to redevelop. 19 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Suburban Residential proposed within the Windwood and Horsehaven subdivisions This doubles the density. 20 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Suburban Residential proposed within the Windwood and Horsehaven subdivisions Neighborhood conservation 21 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Suburban Residential proposed within the Carter's Crossing subdivision This doubles the density 22 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Suburban Residential proposed within the Emerald Forest subdivision Neighborhood conservation 23 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Suburban Residential proposed within the Emerald Forest subdivision Doubles the density 24 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Suburban Residential proposed within the Emerald Forest subdivision Neighborhood conservation 25 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Neighborhood Conservation proposed along the northeast side of Montclair Ave near its intersection with George Bush Dr within the Southside neighborhood Our family lives at 201 Montclair Ave, and I would like to recommend a change to the Future Land Use map. Our property is surrounded on two sides by future commercial use, and we have a duplex on the other side of us, so I think that the correct future land use for our property should be neighborhood commercial. This zoning would square up the parcels, most accurately reflects the use that makes the most sense given the neighbors. 26 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Billie Madely Park, near the intersection of Chimney Hill Dr and Arguello Dr Please add trail access to this park. For example a trail from Chimney Hill Dr to the park would be great! Access to this park is now very bad for C.S. residents. 27 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Urban Center proposed at the intersection of Tarrow St and University Dr Please demand sale of the old Albertsons to a new landowner who will use this property. An old box store sitting empty now for almost 10 years is an eyesore! 28 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Natural & Open Areas proposed along this portion of Spring Loop A simple trail should be added to the areas in green marked by "1" from the dog park, south by the Hilton, and then connect to the other areas marked "1" south of Lincoln. In addition, this trail should be visibly connected through the currently undeveloped area marked "6" between University and Lincoln. What a delight it would be to be able to walk/run/maybe cycle off-street throughout this area. And be connected! 29 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I like this Urban Center proposed along Highland St near its intersection wih Grove St within the Southside neighborhood I think walkability in this area is super important 30 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Neighborhood Conservation proposed along Lee St near its intersection with Park Place within the Southside neighborhood Neighborhood preservation is one of the worst things that City of College Station can allow in this area of the city. This is prime land, and it should be used to build beautiful apartments and mix use buildings along the beautiful creek and nature in this area. This will also limit growth in the city, and make rents and real estate escalate in price like the rest of the USA is currently experiencing. 31 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Neighborhood Conservation proposed along Armistead St and Rosemary Ln within the Redmond Terrace subdivision mix use 32 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Neighborhood Conservation proposed along Ashburn Ave within the College Hills Woodloods area of the Eastgate neighborhood prime real estate, should be urban and higher density buildings 33 Future Land Use Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Wellborn District (Wellborn Estate) proposed to reflect land use classifications specified within the Wellborn Community Plan There should be more density allowed here to match the adjacent Castlegate II subdivision. The character of Wellborn has changed substantially since it was annexed. Page 283 of 310 Comment #:Map Name Source Category Location Comment 34 Future Land Use Open Houses I like this Urban Center proposed along University Dr between Texas Ave and Tarrow St Big fan of more walkable districts. 35 Future Land Use Open Houses I like this Mixed Residential proposed along Nimitz St and Ash St Future land use in my area will only increase the value of my home. I welcome that!! 36 Future Land Use Open Houses I have concerns about this Mixed Residential proposed along Victoria near its future intersection with the extension of Castle Rock Pkwy near the Castle Rock subdivision I have concerns about having apartments & commercial so close to Castle Rock residential. It would change the culture & integrity of the neighbhorhood. Certainly I don't want Castle Rock Pkwy to be an entrance to apartments. 37 Future Land Use Open Houses I have concerns about this General Commercial proposed along SH 6 Frontage Road near Technology Pkwy and Woodcreek Dr, adjacent to Brookwater Circle and the Woodcreek and Amberlake subdivisions What about the church? Will my property value decrease since the General Commercial will be behind my back yard? 38 Future Land Use Open Houses I have concerns about this General Commercial proposed along SH 6 Frontage Road near Technology Pkwy and Woodcreek Dr, adjacent to Brookwater Circle and the Woodcreek and Amberlake subdivisions Can you tell me what the church behind Brookwater own? 39 Future Land Use Open Houses I have concerns about this General Commercial proposed along SH 6 Frontage Road near Technology Pkwy and Woodcreek Dr, adjacent to Brookwater Circle and the Woodcreek and Amberlake subdivisions We object to change in proposed use for Bowers Tract to General Commercial. It will all but destroy Amberlake & contradicts supposed desire to preserve residential neighborhoods. See attached letter from HOA. 40 Future Land Use Open Houses I have concerns about this General Commercial proposed along SH 6 Frontage Road near Technology Pkwy and Woodcreek Dr, adjacent to Brookwater Circle and the Woodcreek and Amberlake subdivisions The light from the car dealerships at night seems inconsistent w/ College Station's attempt to replace street lights, etc. to keep our skies dark. Allen Honda is the worst though. Please address this. 41 Future Land Use Open Houses I have an idea or alternative Blue Ridge and River Ridge Drives in the ETJ I see on the map on the computer that Blue Ridge goes to the river. Is this because we're going to put a park there? A natural preserve? For study & fun? With bike and hiking trails and even boats on the river! It would be sublime! It would make life better for residents to have access to the great outdoors, nature, and wildness. 42 Future Land Use Open Houses I have concerns about this Neighborhood Conservation proposed along Pershing Dr, Goode St, and Glade St within the Southside neighborhood Your def. of neighborhood conservation grossly understates the need for vigilence by city planning + approval of building/driveway permits in remodeling efforts by investors. Investors have preyed on once family neighborhoods been allowed to make buildings that permanently take away from the family character. Be on guard for predatory investors (usually live out of town) 43 Future Land Use Open Houses I have concerns about this Estate Residential proposed for these two parcels along Wayfarer Ln near the intersection with State Highway 6 Would like to discuss more intensive plan use (ie, neighborhood commercial, business center, commercial, etc.) 44 Future Land Use Open Houses I have concerns about this Neighborhood Conservation proposed along Luther St, Welsh Ave, and Park Place within the Southside neighborhood College Park is still seeing Aggie shaks being built. We would love for the city to define Aggie Shacks and really get serious about zoning this. The Council/Mayor should be working together closely to create affordable housing for students while beautifying the city. The university is beautiful - the city should be too. 45 Future Land Use Open Houses I have concerns about this Urban Residential proposed on Rosemary Lane near its intersection with George Bush Dr within the Redmond Terrace subdivision to reflect existing apartment complex development Changing this to urban allows anything to be built across the small street from single family homes. Council denied the last 2 attempts to do exactly this. 46 Future Land Use Open Houses I have an idea or alternative General Commercial proposed along Texas Ave near its intersection with Brentwood Dr General Idea re: Trees does the city have land where a tree nursery could be started to propagate for future plantings & "grow our own"? Enironment, shade, beauty! 47 Future Land Use Open Houses I have concerns about this Medical District land uses along Scott & White Dr and Midtown Dr Widening Rock Prairie from HWY 6 to Medical Drive-- Intersection with Stonebrook Dr needs turn lanes and consideration of a traffic signal - we have accidents w/ people leaving BSW hospital. 48 Future Land Use Open Houses I have an idea or alternative General Commercial proposed along Texas Ave S near George Bush Dr Would love to see City continue to re-develop aged strip centers into walkable, socially pleasing environments for residents & visitors. Many opportunities! Page 284 of 310 Comment #Map Name Source Category Location Comment 1 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have an idea or alternative North Forest Pkwy at SH 6 continue this road, with overpass, to connect to Harvey Mitchell Parkway 2 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have an idea or alternative University Dr at Nagle St please fix the long delay in traffic signals, even when there is no cross traffic 3 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have an idea or alternative University Dr at Tauber St please fix the long delay in traffic signals, even when there is no cross traffic 4 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have an idea or alternative Raymond Stotzer Pkwy at Harvey Mitchell Pkwy Remove the "defective Diamond", it was not constructed properly (supposed to be multi-level, as per the original designer) and causes traffic to stop, even in light traffic loads. convert this to a regular clover leaf intersection 5 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Future Grade Separation at SH 30 and future east Freeway loop n/a 6 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Future Minor Arterial in ETJ west of Saddle Creek more roads needed in this area 7 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Future Minor Arterial in ETJ south of Saddle Creek more roads needed in this area 8 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Future Minor Arterial in ETJ southwest of Saddle Creek more roads needed in this area 9 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Straub Rd at Stousland Rd in ETJ Please fix this road!!! 10 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Future Minor Collector in ETJ west of Meadow Creek more roads needed in this area 11 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Future Minor Arterial in ETJ north of Koppe Bridge Rd more roads needed in this area 12 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Future Minor Collector in ETJ north of Koppe Bridge Rd more roads needed in this area 13 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Future Minor Collector in ETJ south of Timbercrest more roads needed in this area 14 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Future Major Collector in ETJ south of Timbercrest more roads needed in this area 15 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have an idea or alternative Raymond Stotzer Pkwy in ETJ west of SH 47 This is labeled as an expressway but based on definition it is not a controlled access freeway - the only one we have in town is SH 6 Earl Rudder - should be a major arterial not a blue line. 16 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have an idea or alternative Harvey Mitchell Pkwy north of George Bush Dr really not all a controlled access - there are driveways directly taking access to main lanes. 17 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Downgrade Woodlake Dr to a Minor Collector This road currently dead ends in the Wood Lake neighborhood. Opening up as a through road will significantly ruin the character of this otherwise beautiful neighborhood. 18 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Remove proposed Minor Collector in ETJ east of Woodlake This road currently dead ends in the Wood Lake neighborhood. Opening up as a through road will significantly ruin the character of this otherwise beautiful neighborhood. 19 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Downgrade future collector in ETJ east of Woodlake to Minor Collector This road currently dead ends in the Wood Lake neighborhood. Opening up as a through road will significantly ruin the character of this otherwise beautiful neighborhood. 20 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Downgrade future collector in ETJ west of Woodlake to Minor Collector This road currently dead ends in the Wood Lake neighborhood. Opening up as a through road will significantly ruin the character of this otherwise beautiful neighborhood. Please help preserve Wood Lake. 21 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Remove proposed Minor Collector in ETJ south of Creek Meadows This road currently dead ends in the Wood Lake neighborhood. Opening up as a through road will significantly ruin the character of this otherwise beautiful neighborhood. Please help preserve Wood Lake. 22 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Create New Street with Maple St extension as Minor Collector in Northgate n/a 23 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Remove portion of Cherry St from being a Minor Collector n/a 24 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Downgrade Wellborn Rd between University Dr and George Bush Dr to 4-lane Major Arterial This is up to TxDOT to decide what is feasible. Elevated structures could add capacity. 25 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Add Nimitz St as Minor Collector (Potential Alternative B)n/a Public Comments on the Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map and Open Houses, August-September 2021 Page 285 of 310 Comment #Map Name Source Category Location Comment 26 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Add Ash St extension as Minor Collector (Potential Alternative A)n/a 27 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Add Nunn St as Minor Collector Does not need to be a thoroughfare. 28 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Downgrade Foster Ave to a Minor Collector n/a 29 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Downgrade Foster Ave to a Minor Collector This area is anticipated to be more dense and intense. Land use change requires more capacity. keep as is. 30 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Reclassify George Bush Dr E between Texas Ave and Dominik Dr as Minor Arterial n/a 31 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Reclassify George Bush Dr E between Dominik Dr and Harvey Rd as Minor Arterial (Potential Alternative C) n/a 32 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Add Munson Ave between Lincoln Ave and Dominik Dr as a Minor Collector You will get major opposition if added to Thoroughfare plan. Keep as is. 33 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Downgrade Dominik Dr between Munson Ave and Glenhaven Dr to a Minor Collector n/a 34 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Add Merry Oaks Dr between Domnik Dr and University Oaks Blvvd as a Minor Collector n/a 35 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Downgrade Glenhaven Dr between Brazoswood Dr and Dominik Dr to a Minor Collector n/a 36 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Downgrade Brazoswood Dr to a Minor Collector This are could re-develop to more density or intense use. Keep as is. 37 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Remove Switch Station Rd as a future Minor Collector Keep as is. Connectivity and capacity plus a way to get across SH 6. 38 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Add Scarlett O'Hara Dr as a Minor Collector n/a 39 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Add future Minor Collector on Post Oak Mall (Potential Alternative D)Might need another collector going east and west on this property for redevelopment purposes creating a grid configuration. 40 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Add Park Place between Anderson St and Glade St as a Minor Collector n/a 41 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Downgrade Timber St between George Bush Dr and Park Place to a Minor Collector Keep and take it to Timm St. 42 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Downgrade Glade St between Park Place and Southwest Pkwy to a Minor Collector n/a 43 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Remove Colgate Dr as Minor Collector stub east of Central Park Ln Keep as is. 44 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Downgrade Holleman Dr West between Harvey Mitchell Pkwy and Jones Bulter Rd to Major Collector Keep as is. We need as much capacity as possible in this area. 45 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Add North Dowling Rd between Holleman Dr South and Junction Boys Rd as a Major Collector n/a 46 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Remove Luther St West extension west of Harvey Mitchell Pkwy (Potential Alternative E) Need connectivity , capacity and alternative route. Keep as is. 47 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Remove Cain Rd between Holleman Dr South and Towers Pkwy as a Minor Collector Keep as is for connectivity purposes. Page 286 of 310 Comment #Map Name Source Category Location Comment 48 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Create New Street with Towers Pkwy extension as a Minor Collector n/a 49 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Add Navarro Dr between Wellborn Rd and Welsh Ave as a Minor Collector n/a 50 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Add Airline Dr between Longmire Dr and Southwood Dr as a Minor Collector n/a 51 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Remove dead end stub of Southwood Dr south of Todd Trail as a Minor Collector n/a 52 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have an idea or alternative Potential extension of Southwood Dr to San Felipe Dr As part of redevelopment it would be good to connect Southwood with San Felipe. 53 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Remove stub of Emerald Pwky past Bent Oak St as a Major Collector n/a 54 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Downgrade Sebesta Rd between SH 6 and Pavilion Ave to a Minor Collector Keep as is. This area will need additional capacity as it develops. 55 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Add Normand Dr betweeen Rock Prairie Rd and Ponderosa Dr as a Minor Collector n/a 56 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Add Bridle Gate Dr as a Minor Collector n/a 57 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Remove future General Pkwy between N. Graham Rd and future 4-lane Major Arterial (Potential Alternative F) Keep, need connectivity and capacity. 58 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Remove future Wiliiam D. Fithc Pkwy extension between Wellborn Rd and Rock Prairie Rd (Potential Alternative G) Keep. Need connectivity and capacity. 59 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Add Brandenburg Ln as a Minor Collector n/a 60 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have an idea or alternative Town Lake Dr and SH 6 It was a mistake moving the Barron Rd extension away from the crossing at SH 6. Now traffic will be directed to the Rock Prairie crossing. 61 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Corporate Pkwy extension at William D. Fitch Pkwy The connection should be at Pebble Creek with Pebble Creek developer paying for the installation of the traffic signal. 62 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Add Gateway Blvd as a Major Collector n/a 63 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Add Brewser Dr between William D. Fitch Pkwy and WS Phillips Pkwy as a Minor Collector n/a 64 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Downgrade future Brewster Dr to a Minor Collector n/a 65 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Downgrade Woodlake Dr to a Minor Collector Need capacity. keep as is. 66 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Add Old Royder Road as a Minor Collector n/a 67 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Downgrade future collector in ETJ east of Woodlake to Minor Collector Keep as is. Need capacity 68 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Remove future collector in ETJ between Woodlake Dr and Riva Ridge Rd Keep as is need capacity. 69 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Downgrade future collector in ETJ west of Woodlake to Minor Collector Keep as is. Need Capacity Page 287 of 310 Comment #Map Name Source Category Location Comment 70 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Add Riva Ridge Rd in ETJ between Woodlake Dr and Calumet Tr as a Minor Collector n/a 71 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Remove future collector in ETJ east of Woodlake Keep as is. Need connectivity and capacity. 72 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Downgrade Woodlake Dr to a Minor Collector Keep as is. Need capacity 73 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Remove future collector in ETJ west of Woodlake Keep as is. Need connectivity and capacity. 74 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Remove future collector in ETJ south of Creek Meadows Keep as is. need connectivity and capacity. 75 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Downgrade Woodlake Dr to a Minor Collector Thank you for downgrading this street. This is a positive change that better fits the existing context. Nice work! That said, the preference would be for this to not be considered a thoroughfare at all but just a street that connects. After all is the city really going to make this a true thoroughfare section? 76 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Future Minor Collector in ETJ west of Woodlake This is blocking one residential home with a major street on every side of it. This is a family home, and not a good solution. 77 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Downgrade Woodlake Dr to a Minor Collector Woodlake Drive is a subdivision road with houses facing the street and already traffic moves through at an unsafe speed above 30 mph. I am against conversion of subdivisions to thoroughfares in general. But as a resident of Woodlake Dr, for the past 15 years, this access point is NOT valuable enough for the negative impacts it would cause. Therefore, while the downgrade is better than making it a bigger thoroughfare, I would prefer for Woodlake Drive to not be extended to Arrington at all. 78 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have an idea or alternative Potential extension of Woodlake Dr to the north Woodlake Drive at Victoria: Extend Woodlake Drive northwest to intersect with Wellborn road or possibly T-ing into Barron or McCullough. This would relieve bottlenecks at Victoria and Wellborn. 79 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Downgrade Woodlake Dr to a Minor Collector Downgrading Woodlake is a move in the right direction, however, increasing the traffic on Woodlake is a bad idea because of the nature of the neighborhood. There are no sidewalks in the neighborhood so people walk on the street. There is a strong and active walking community in Woodlake. increasing the traffic significantly will disrupt the neighborhood community that is active and one of the strengths of the neighborhood. Disrupting that would be a complete catastrophe. 80 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Add Riva Ridge Rd in ETJ between Woodlake Dr and Calumet Tr as a Minor Collector Downgrading Riva Ridge is a move in the right direction, however, increasing the traffic on Riva Ridge is a bad idea because of the nature of the neighborhood. There are no sidewalks in the neighborhood so people walk on the street. There is a strong and active walking community in Woodlake and Riva ridge is a big part of the walking loop. Increasing the traffic significantly will disrupt the neighborhood community that is active and one of the strengths of the neighborhood. Disrupting that would not only disrupt the people it would disrupt the natural environment and all the animals that currently frequent the area, including deer, roadrunners, rabbits, squires, turtles, hawks, kites, owls, and many more. It would also endanger the pets in the neighborhood including horses, chicken, horse people on horses dogs, cats and such. Increasing traffic significantly in this area is a detriment to the neighborhood. 81 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Remove future collector in ETJ between Woodlake Dr and Riva Ridge Rd removing this link is a good idea.... proposing it was a terrible idea to begin with.....thanks 82 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I like this Capstone Dr at Wellborn Rd Would like to see this area connected quickly. 83 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have an idea or alternative Wellborn Rd between George Bush Dr and Southwest Pkwy Keep the 4 lanes that exist, instead add TREES and PROTECTED BIKE LANES, to decrease traffic 84 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Add Ash St extension as Minor Collector (Potential Alternative A)seems unnecessary? 85 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Old Wellborn Rd at Rock Praire Rd West Traffic exiting Old Wellborn to the NE is an issue. A simple barricade here would alleviate most issues at this intersection. Traffic flows well both directions on Rock Prairie and Traffic enter and leaving the SW part of Wellborn is not an issue. There are no issues with East bound traffic turning left through the intersection on the SW part of Old Wellborn. Only witnessed issues are repeatedly the Barracks traffic. I believe that the traffic from this area should have to exit on Deacon. The other 3 remaining points of this intersection and median could remain untouched until the over or underpass proposed is completed. 86 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Downgrade Woodlake Dr to a Minor Collector I live on Woodlake. I do not want Woodlake to connect to Arrington rd. I want to preserve the beauty and integrity of our private neighborhood. Page 288 of 310 Comment #Map Name Source Category Location Comment 87 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Downgrade future collector in ETJ east of Woodlake to Minor Collector I live in Woodlake. I do not want access to other neighborhoods like Greens Prairie Reserve or Sweetwater. We want to remain a private neighborhood. 88 Thoroughfare Plan Virtual Map I have concerns about this Downgrade future collector in ETJ west of Woodlake to Minor Collector I live in Woodlake. I do not want access to Royder Rd. into Woodlake. We want our neighborhood to remain private with no changes to entrances or exits. 89 Thoroughfare Plan Open Houses I have concerns about this Nimitz St and Ash St Road widening is a big concern. Although I welcome the idea I dread the time it will take for contractor to complete project. The subcontractors you hire take way too long. Look @ Francis Dr - unbelieaveable!! 90 Thoroughfare Plan Open Houses I have concerns about this Luther St West extension west of Harvey Mithell Pkwy Concerned about Luther being removed from T-Fare Plan. 91 Thoroughfare Plan Open Houses I have concerns about this Future Minor Arterial west of Easterwood Airport Wish to see another outer route to Hwy 60 from Wellborn.. 92 Thoroughfare Plan Open Houses I have an idea or alternative Harvey Mitchell Pkwy at Welsh Ave Checkback 10 years of accidents. Too many high speed vehicles traveling on FM2818 have hit pedestrians & vehicles crossing at Welsh. Please make that intersection into a grade separation to bring relief to the danger everyone faces. 93 Thoroughfare Plan Open Houses I have an idea or alternative Langford St at Southwest Pkwy Langford going to Southknoll for cyclists & peds presents a congestion hazard by cars/buses. Could the street become one way toward S.K., change bus ingress route, widen sidewalk??? 94 Thoroughfare Plan Open Houses I have an idea or alternative Harvey Mitchell Pkwy at Welsh Ave I have witnessed tragic accidents @Welsh & 2818. This intersection also needs to be part of the grade separation! Check back in traffic accidents @ that location. 95 Thoroughfare Plan Open Houses I have concerns about this Pershing Ave I live on Pershing, which is a student-heavily traveled street. I would greatly appreciate placement of an electronic device that shows a drivers speed. This might assist in pedestrian traffic on this end connecting streets. 96 Thoroughfare Plan Open Houses I like this Wellborn Rd at Capstone Dr and Graham Rd Like moving Capstone to meet Barron Rd. Wellborn needs expansion as you know. Graham is a nightmare. 97 Thoroughfare Plan Open Houses I have concerns about this Future street connections in ETJ to Woodlake subdivsion I would like for Woodlake Dr. to not become a through street and I would like it to be downgraded further to be a residential road. I would like it to remain a dead end road that ends at the lake - as it now exists. I would also like for Calumet to not to connect to Arrington and to not connect to Riva Ridge Rd. I would like the future collector from WS Phillips Pkwy to Woodlake Dr to not be built. The reason for the above is that I want Woodlake neighborhood to remain a safe and quiet neighborhood. Adjoining neighborhoods have crime - I often hear of break ins of cars and packages stolen in these neighborhoods. To create through streets in Woodlake would give thieves several ways in and out of the neighborhood, it would damage the character and the integrity of the neighborhood. Thank you. Page 289 of 310 Comment #Map Name Source Category Location Comment 1 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I like this Proposed Shared-use Path on Rock Prairie Road A bike lane or path on Rock Prairie would be a gift from the gods. 2 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Lick Creek Greenway Trail at William D. Fitch Parkway This is hopeless at present if you want to get onto Fitch and not go into Pebble Creek! There should be a way on and off Fitch without clambering around on one side or wading through mud on the other! 3 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I like this Proposed Shared-use Path on William D. Fitch Parkway This junction is difficult for cyclists at present, would be great to make it easier. 4 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I like this Proposed Bicycle Facility at SH6 and William D. Fitch Parkway If the proposal here is to find a way for cyclists to get under 6 without the danger of Fitch as it currently is here, that would be fantastic! 5 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Rock Prairie Road and Wellborn Road This junction is currently a horror for cyclists. It is so dangerous to cross Wellborn at Rock Prairie here! Even at the pedestrian crossing, drivers turn right off Rock Prairie into Wellborn and I have nearly been hit. Making this junction safer for pedestrians and cyclists would be really good. 6 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Shared Use Path proposed along Utility Easement Why not use the existing crossing under WDF? 7 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Shared Use Path proposed along Utility Easement Why cant these two bike and path lines be combined? 8 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Existing Bike Route at the end of Forest Oaks Drive Why does this deadend here? 9 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Wellborn Community Where is the connectivity here? 10 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Existing Bike Lane on Jones Butler Road I believe that the bicycle path along Jones Butler to Marion Pugh should be two lanes on one side of the road in order to create a safe route and encourage substantial use of this route. 11 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Existing Bike Route on Dexter Drive This blue line on Dexter indicates a bike lane. Changing this to a red or green trail would enhance this area tremendously. It would make a safe area for students/professors to bike to campus and it would begin a GREEN corridor from Brison Park to Gabbard Park. This would begin a larger enhancement campaign to give more outdoor activities to all residents of College Station. 12 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Existing Bike Route on Dexter Drive If the Dexter trail were changed to be a red or green trail with a defined bike lane, then this could then lead to the next change, which is making the trail on Haines to be a red or green trail as well with well-defined bike lanes. This trail then leads all the way to Lemon Tree Park. Again, you are creating a loop around this highly populated park of College Station--you want to create an experience...you can bike for long lengths of time safely to green parks. These green parks can be updated as well. This is good for young children, young families, students, middle aged citizens, older citizens. 13 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Existing Bike Lane on Anderson Street The Anderson bike lane should be updated to a GREEN trail, adding trees along the way to make it an outdoor experience. This trail connects the schools to three parks in the inner city of College Station. Anderson Trail connects A&M Consolidated/Oakwood, Anderson Park (more entrances and things to do could be added here), Lemontree Park, down to Bee Creek Park and the cemetery. This could be a main biking trail in the city! Picture people biking to the tennis courts at Bee Creek and professors biking their children to school from all of the neighborhoods nearby. 14 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Existing Bike Lane on Holleman Drive It is absolutely great that Holleman has a red trail, but it would be even better to update it to GREEN, adding trees along the way. This bike trail can lead from John Crompton to Wolf Pen Creek Park. These trails need to be so nice that we can add them to the All Trails app for hikers and bikers. Trails should be added at both of these parks so that both walkers and bikers can continue to enjoy the outdoors in beautiful College Station! 15 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Proposed Bike Route on Texas Avenue Texas Avenue should be updated to be either a red or green trail. There needs to be a designated trail for bikers. This can be seen in other college towns where students ride scooters and bike easily through town. Texas Avenue is the entrance into the city and needs to look updated. The first step might be to update this trail all the way down to the interchange at highway six and Texas Ave. 16 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I like this Proposed Shared Use Path on F&B Road Great! 17 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative F&B Road on TAMU Property A multiuse sidewalk is needed along F&B road. There is no sidewalk at present, which is quite unbelievable to me. Please partner with TAMU to build this. 18 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Proposed Sidewalk on Walton Drive A sidewalk is needed along Walton Dr. I believe this should be a high priority. Public Comments on Bicycle and Pedestrian Maps Virtual Map and Open Houses, August-September 2021 Page 290 of 310 Comment #Map Name Source Category Location Comment 19 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Intersection of University Drive and Tarrow Street The crossing signal at University and Tarrow needs to be modified to give pedestrians priority when they push the button for crossing. Currently, traffic going south on Tarrow gets a green light when the pedestrian crossing signal is lit. A large percentage of drivers turn west on university in front, or potentially into, pedestrians crossing in the sidewalk. Currently, it is safer to jaywalk instead of using the button to activate the pedestrian signal. Easy modifications to save lives/injuries are to 1) Delay the green signal for drivers when the pedestrian button is pushed, 2) Set up a highly visible flashing red signal for drivers when the pedestrian signal is activated. Seems like a "cheap" solution to a currently dangerous situation. 20 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Intersection of Walton Drive and Texas Avenue The current traffic signal cycle is dangerous for pedestrians/cyclists. When the pedestrian signal is activated, cars should not be allowed to turn right or left. It is not unusual for cars to disrespect the pedestrian signal. Very easy and cheap change to make. 21 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I like this Shared Use Path proposed along Wellborn Road between George Bush Drive and Luther Street This mixed use path is extremely needed as walkability from the neighborhoods south of campus to campus is sorely lacking. extending it further maybe down to holleman would be ideal 22 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Wellborn Road near Southwest Parkway Welborne Road is in DIRE need of a protected bike lane that connects the university to the apartments south of Harvey Mitchel Pkwy 23 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative George Bush Drive near Penberthy Boulevard Protected Bike lane separate from Pedestrians. Gets rid of conflict between two modes of sustainable transportation 24 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have concerns about this Proposed Bike Route on Texas Avenue Shared with vehicles on a 45mph?!?! no. PLEASE make separate protected bike lanes on Texas, will improve business accessibility for everyone. 25 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Virtual Maps I have an idea or alternative Existing Bike Route on Southwest Parkway I live on Southwest. Riding the bike on the side walk is horrible, and going on the street is scary and cars usually speed here. LOWER speed limits, or give bikes the proper street space like a bike lane or protected bike lane 26 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I like this Proposed Bike Lanes on Holleman Drive West Bike lanes connecting Holleman and Wellborn would be awesome! 27 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I like this Proposed Bike Lanes on Proposed Street through the Lone Star Pavilion Shopping Center Bicycle lane addition is needed in this area. It is a big hazard for the public to ride bikes around here. 28 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I like this Existing Buffered Bike Lanes on George Bush Drive I love how the newly painted bike lanes are so much wider = safer which is great! 29 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I have an idea or alternative Existing Bike Route on Dexter Drive and Welsh Avenue Welsh & Dexter as current bike paths are death traps thru College Park. Perhaps closing Welsh to cars (except for property owners) & use it as a pedestrian/bike only pathway - especially on big events. 30 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I have an idea or alternative Intersection of Welsh Avenue and Harvey Mitchell Parkway Sun sails; artificial shade for pedestrians/bicyclists waiting at intersection. Very hot to sit and wait for light. 31 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I have concerns about this Proposed Bike Lanes on Woodcreek Drive Please update map; Woodcreek presently has a bike lane with designation. 32 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I have concerns about this Intersection of Victoria Avenue, Welsh Avenue and Rock Prairie Road It is so important to improve the bike facilities at Rock Prairie/Welsh & Victoria intersection! I bike through almost daily as I drop my son off for school. I'd LOVE the shared use path to be funded & built!! 33 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I have an idea or alternative Anderson Street, George Bush Drive, Dexter Drive and Holleman Drive Create loops in the city, green loops. #1 Anderson, George Bush, Dexter, Holleman 34 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I have an idea or alternative Existing Bike Route on Dexter Drive Change Dexter to a green mixed use path on one side. Any road where you have limited space... combine the existing skinny paths/sidewalks to a lonegr, useable path. 35 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I have an idea or alternative Holleman Drive On Holleman, one side of the road could ne changed to a green shared-path. There is a skinny sidewalk and skinny bike path. Combine these for one large path. Holleman can connect three parks. 36 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I have concerns about this Existing Bike Route on Longmire Drive The blike lane disapears for 2 blocks! 37 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I have an idea or alternative William D. Fitch Parkway Expand William D. Fitch to include wider turning lanes and increased bike paths to connect all communities. 38 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I have an idea or alternative Proposed Shared Use Path along Carters Creek I think it would be fabulous to add bike paths/pedestrian paths through the green areas on the other side (east) of HWY 6. This would give outdoor activities and green for all residents of College Station. 39 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I like this Proposed Sidewalk on Greens Prairie Road (county section) I know this section is the County, but I'd love to see the sidewalk available for the school aged kids who walk & bike to school. 40 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I like this Proposed Sidewalks in Eastgate Redevelopment Area Pedestrian map will be welcomed. This will help keep folks off my lawn. Page 291 of 310 Comment #Map Name Source Category Location Comment 41 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I have concerns about this Proposed Sidewalks on Fairview Avenue and Montclair Avenue Proposed sidewalks down Fairview and Montclair will take out 100 yr old oaks unless alternate construction is enforced by council (i.e. gravel, raised decking on piers). 42 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I have concerns about this Proposed Sidewalk on Foxfire Drive I think it is essential to fund sidewalks along this section of Foxfire Dr. It is dangerous at present to pedestrians and bicyclists. 43 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I have concerns about this Lick Creek Greenway Trail at Midtown Drive The underpass at Midtown Dr and the greenway trail. It always floods and then is closed. People ignore the barriers. We should fix the problem so the trail is useful all year round! 44 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I like this Existing Sidewalks behind Oakwood Intermediate School I am so happy to see 10' side walks behind Oakwood/AMCMS for the safe walking of students. Also thank you for taking down a tree at glade + P.P. which cast so much shadow on students crossing PP that drivers on Glade couldn't safely see them. 45 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I have concerns about this Normand Drive, Jennifer Drive and Wildrye Drive Normand Dr, Jennifer Dr, and Wildrye Dr. need sidewalks and street lights. People have to walk in streets which are littered w/ nails, glass, metal, etc. Lights would help deter crime. Cars litter and congest Wildrye. Very unsightly. 46 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I have an idea Near Castlegate Subdivision More walking paths will encourage increased health and possible fewer health problems, and encourage families walking more together. 47 Bicycle & Pedestrian Maps Open House I have concerns about this Comal Circle and Arboles Circle Pedestrian path between Comal Circle and Arboles. I spoke to Venessa Garza and she was very helpful. She was aware of the issue from a previous CS survey in 2013/2014. Page 292 of 310 October 14, 2021 Item No. 8.2. Resolution to set a public hearing on amendments to land use assumptions, capital improvement plans, and impact fees for roadway, water, and wastewater. Sponsor:Jason Schubert, Carol Cotter Reviewed By CBC:N/A Agenda Caption:Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding a resolution to set a public hearing on amendments to land use assumptions, capital improvement plans, and impact fees for roadway, water, and wastewater. Relationship to Strategic Goals: Financial Sustainability Core Services & Infrastructure Diverse & Growing Economy Improving Mobility Recommendation(s): Staff recommends approval of the resolution. Summary: This resolution sets the date and time for a public hearing on amendments to land use assumptions, capital improvement plans, and impact fees for roadway, water, and wastewater on the November 22, 2021, City Council Regular Meeting. The City adopted city-wide impact fees for roadway, water, and wastewater facilities in 2016. State law requires municipalities to consider updates to the impact fee studies every 5 years. Kimley-Horn & Associates, Inc. (KHA) was contracted to perform the roadway impact fee study update and Freese and Nichols, Inc. (FNI) for the water and wastewater impact fee study updates that are in progress. In accordance with the Texas Local Government Code, a resolution must be approved by City Council to establish a public hearing date to consider the amendments to the land use assumptions, capital improvements plan, and impact fees. At their November 22, 2021, meeting, City Council will consider the amendments, impact fees, and associated ordinances. Budget & Financial Summary: N/A Attachments: 1.Resolution Page 293 of 310 RESOLUTION NO. ____________ A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS, SETTING A PUBLIC HEARING DATE OF NOVEMBER 22, 2021, FOR CONSIDERATION OF AMENDMENTS TO LAND USE ASSUMPTIONS, CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLANS, AND IMPACT FEES FOR ROADWAY, WATER AND WASTEWATER. WHEREAS, the City Council adopted maximum assessable system-wide impact fees, and imposed reduced collection rates, on September 22, 2016 for water and wastewater, and on November 10, 2016 for roadways; and WHEREAS, § 395.054 Texas Local Government Code sets forth that a political subdivision must adopt an order or resolution establishing a public hearing date to discuss the amendments to the land use assumptions, capital improvement plans, and impact fees; and WHEREAS, the Impact Fee Advisory Committee for Roadways, and Water and Wastewater will review and provide written comments to City Council; and WHEREAS, in accordance with the aforesaid statutory requirement the City Council desires to call a public hearing to discuss and consider amendments to the land use assumptions, capital improvement plans, and impact fees, now therefore, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS: PART 1: That the facts and recitations set forth in the preamble of this Resolution are hereby declared true and correct. PART 2: That the City Council of the City of College Station, Texas hereby calls for a public hearing to be held during the Regular Council session on November 22, 2021, at 5:00 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers at 1101 Texas Avenue, College Station, Texas. The purpose of this public hearing is to discuss the amendment of City-wide roadway impact fees divided into four quadrants, water impact fees, and wastewater impact fees. PART 2: That City staff is hereby authorized and directed to notice said public hearing and to take all reasonable measures to give effect to this Resolution, including preparing notice in accordance with § 395.055 Texas Local Government Code. ADOPTED this 14th day of October, A.D. 2021. ATTEST: APPROVED: ______________________________ _________________________________ City Secretary MAYOR APPROVED: _______________________________ City Attorney Page 294 of 310 October 14, 2021 Item No. 8.3. Ordinance Extending Mayoral Renewal of Disaster Declaration Sponsor:Bryan Woods, City Manager Reviewed By CBC:City Council Agenda Caption:Presentation, discussion, and possible action regarding an ordinance consenting to and extending the Mayor's renewal of a disaster declaration due to public health emergency. Relationship to Strategic Goals: Good Governance Recommendation(s): Staff recommend that Council adopt the ordinance. Summary: On March 17, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation declaring a state of disaster for the City of College Station resulting from the threat of a public health emergency resulting from coronavirus disease 2019, now designated SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19). On March 18, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued an order closing all bars, limiting restaurants to only take-out, drive-through, or delivery services and amended the declaration to limit gatherings to less than ten (10) people in the best interest of the public health, safety and welfare to protect life in College Station in response to COVID-19. On March 23, 2020, the College Station City Council adopted an Extension of Disaster Ordinance with Ordinance No. 2020-4164 extending the March 17, 2020, Disaster Declaration and extending the Mayor’s Order of March 18, 2020. On March 23, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a Second Mayoral Order mandating the citizens of College Station to shelter in place until Tuesday, April 7, 2020. On March 30, 2020, the College Station City Council adopted an ordinance consenting and approving the Second Mayoral Order. On April 21, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a renewal to the Disaster Declaration. On April 23, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020-4169 to the Mayor’s April 21, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal. On May 22, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a renewal to the Disaster Declaration. On May 28, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020-4181 to the Mayor’s May 22, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal. On June 22, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a renewal to the Disaster Declaration. On June 25, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020-4195 to the Mayor’s June 22, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal. On June 25, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a Third Mayoral Order mandating face coverings for commercial entities until Friday, July 10, 2020. On July 9, 2020, the College Station Page 295 of 310 City Council consented with Ordinance No. 2020-4197 to the Third Mayoral Order of June 25, 2020, mandating commercial entities to require face coverings. On July 22, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a renewal to the Disaster Declaration. On July 23, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020-4203 to the Mayor’s July 22, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal. On August 13, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a Fourth Mayoral Order delegating authority to the Texas A&M University President to approve gatherings over 10 people on state lands and facilities it owns or controls. On August 21, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a renewal to the Disaster Declaration. On August 27, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020-4209 to the Mayor’s August 21, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal. On September 21, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a renewal to the Disaster Declaration. On September 24, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020-4211 to the Mayor’s September 21, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal. On October 20, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a renewal to the Disaster Declaration. On October 22, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020-4220 to the Mayor’s October 20, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal. On November 20, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a renewal to the Disaster Declaration. On November 23, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020-4226 to the Mayor’s November 20, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal. On December 7, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a renewal to the Disaster Declaration. On December 10, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020-4231 to the Mayor’s December 7, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal. On January 8, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a renewal to the Disaster Declaration. On January 14, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021-4239 to the Mayor’s January 8, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal. On February 8, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a renewal to the Disaster Declaration. On February 11, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021-4240 to the Mayor’s February 8, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal. On March 8, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a renewal to the Disaster Declaration. On March 11, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021-4246 to the Mayor’s March 8, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal. On April 6, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a renewal to the Disaster Declaration. On April 8, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021-4258 to the Mayor’s April 6, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal. On May 7, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a renewal to the Disaster Declaration. On May 13, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021-4263 to the Mayor’s May Page 296 of 310 7, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal. On June 7, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a renewal to the Disaster Declaration. On June 10, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021-4271 to the Mayor’s June 7, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal. On July 2, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a renewal to the Disaster Declaration. On July 8, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021-4275 to the Mayor’s July 2, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal. On August 6, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a renewal to the Disaster Declaration. On August 12, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021-4288 to the Mayor’s August 6, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal. On September 6, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a renewal to the Disaster Declaration. On September 9, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021-4299 to the Mayor’s September 6, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal. On October 7, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020, December 7, 2020, January 8, 2021, February 8, 2021, March 8, 2021, April 6, 2021, May 7, 2021, June 7, 2021, July 2, 2021, August 6, 2021, and September 6, 2021. The conditions necessitating the declaration of a state of disaster and mayoral orders continue to exist. The Council needs to consent to and approve the Mayor's Disaster Declaration renewal. Budget & Financial Summary: N/A Attachments: 1.Disaster Declaration Renewal Ordinance 10-14-21 Page 297 of 310 ORDINANCE NO.__________ DISASTER DECLARATION RENEWAL AND EXTENSION ORDINANCE WHEREAS, on March 17, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation declaring a state of disaster for the City of College Station resulting from the threat of a public health emergency resulting from coronavirus disease 2019, now designated SARS-CoV2, (COVID-19); and WHEREAS, on March 18, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued an order closing all bars, limiting restaurants to only take-out, drive-through, or delivery services and amended the declaration to limit gatherings to less than ten (10) people in the best interest of the public health, safety and welfare to protect life in College Station in response to COVID-19; and WHEREAS, on March 23, 2020, the College Station City Council adopted an Extension of Disaster Ordinance with Ordinance No. 2020-4164 extending the March 17, 2020, Disaster Declaration and extending the Mayor’s Order of March 18, 2020; and WHEREAS, on March 23, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a Second Mayoral Order mandating the citizens of College Station to shelter in place until Tuesday, April 7, 2020; and WHEREAS, on March 30, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance No. 2020-4166 to the Second Mayoral Order of March 23, 2020, mandating the citizens of College Station to shelter in place until Tuesday, April 7, 2020; and WHEREAS, on April 21, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, the order and amended disaster declaration proclaimed by the Mayor on March 18, 2020, both consented to and extended by the City Council on March 23P , P2020, in Ordinance No. 2020-4164; and WHEREAS, on April 23, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020- 4169 to the Mayor’s April 21, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on May 22, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, and April 21, 2020; and WHEREAS, on May 28, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020- 4181 to the Mayor’s May 22, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on June 22, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, and May 22, 2020; and Page 298 of 310 Ordinance No. Page 2 of 7 WHEREAS, on June 25, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020- 4195 to the June 22, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on June 25, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a Third Mayoral Order mandating commercial entities to require face coverings from: 6:00 A.M., Monday, June 29, 2020, and ending at 11:59 P.M., Friday, July 10, 2020; and WHEREAS, on July 9, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance No. 2020-4197 to the Third Mayoral Order of June 25, 2020, mandating commercial entities to require face coverings; and WHEREAS, on July 22, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, and June 22, 2020; and WHEREAS, on July 23, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020- 4203 to the June 22, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on August 13, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a Fourth Mayoral Order delegating authority to the Texas A&M University President to approve gatherings over 10 people on state lands and facilities it owns or controls; and WHEREAS, on August 21, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, and July 22, 2020; and WHEREAS, on August 27, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020-4209 to the June 22, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on September 21, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020 and August 21, 2020; and WHEREAS, on September 24, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020-4211 to the September 21, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on October 20, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020; and September 21, 2020, and WHEREAS, on October 22, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020-4220 to the October 20, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and Page 299 of 310 Ordinance No. Page 3 of 7 WHEREAS, on November 20, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, and October 20, 2020, and WHEREAS, on November 23, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020-4226 to the November 20, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on December 7, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, October 20, 2020, and November 20, 2020, and WHEREAS, on December 10, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020-4231 to the November 20, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on January 8, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020 and December 7, 2020, and WHEREAS, on January 14, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021-4239 to the January 8, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on February 8, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020, December 7, 2020, and January 8, 2021, and WHEREAS, on February 11, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021-4240 to the February 8, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on March 8, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020, December 7, 2020, January 8, 2021, and February 8, 2021, and WHEREAS, on March 11, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021-4246 to the March 8, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on April 6, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, Page 300 of 310 Ordinance No. Page 4 of 7 September 21, 2020, October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020, December 7, 2020, January 8, 2021, February 8, 2021, and March 8, 2021, and WHEREAS, on April 8, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021- 4258 to the April 6, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on May 7, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020, December 7, 2020, January 8, 2021, February 8, 2021, March 8, 2021, and April 6, 2021; and WHEREAS, on May 13, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021- 4263 to the May 7, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on June 7, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020, December 7, 2020, January 8, 2021, February 8, 2021, March 8, 2021, April 6, 202 and May 7, 2021; and WHEREAS, on June 10, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021- 4271 to the June 7, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on July 2, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020, December 7, 2020, January 8, 2021, February 8, 2021, March 8, 2021, April 6, 2021, May 7, 2021; June 7, 2021; and WHEREAS, on July 8, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021- 4275 to the June 7, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on August 6, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020, December 7, 2020, January 8, 2021, February 8, 2021, March 8, 2021, April 6, 2021, May 7, 2021; June 7, 2021, and July 2, 2021; and WHEREAS, on August 12, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021-4288 to the August 6, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on September 6, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020, December 7, 2020, January 8, 2021, Page 301 of 310 Ordinance No. Page 5 of 7 February 8, 2021, March 8, 2021, April 6, 2021, May 7, 2021; June 7, 2021, July 2, 2021, and August 6, 2021; and WHEREAS, on September 9, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021-4299 to the September 6, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on October 7, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020, December 7, 2020, January 8, 2021, February 8, 2021, March 8, 2021, April 6, 2021, May 7, 2021; June 7, 2021, July 2, 2021, August 6, 2021, and September 6, 2021; and WHEREAS, said state of disaster requires that certain emergency measures be taken pursuant to the Texas Government Code, Chapter 418; and the following regulations shall take effect immediately upon issuance, and shall remain in effect until the state of disaster is terminated or as stated below; and WHEREAS, the conditions necessitating declaration of a state of disaster and mayoral orders continue to exist; and WHEREAS, said state of disaster requires that certain emergency measures be taken pursuant to the Texas Government Code, Chapter 418; and the following regulations shall take effect immediately upon issuance, and shall remain in effect until the state of disaster is terminated or as stated below; and NOW THEREFORE, BE IT ORDERED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF COLLEGE STATION: 1. That the state of disaster renewal proclaimed by the Mayor on October 7, 2021, as set out in Exhibit A is consented to and extended by the College Station City Council and shall continue until terminated by the College Station City Council. 2. This Ordinance is passed as an emergency measure and pursuant to local authority for emergency measures and shall become effective on the 14th P day of October, 2021. Page 302 of 310 Ordinance No. Page 6 of 7 PASSED AND ADOPTED, this 14th P day of October, 2021. APPROVED: ATTEST: ___________________ ___________________ Mayor City Secretary APPROVED: ___________________ City Attorney Page 303 of 310 Ordinance No. Page 7 of 7 EXHIBIT A DISASTER RENEWAL PROCLAIMED BY THE MAYOR ON OCTOBER 7, 2021 Page 304 of 310 DECLARATION OF DISASTER RENEWAL WHEREAS, on March 17, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation declaring a state of disaster for the City of College Station resulting from the threat of a public health emergency resulting from coronavirus disease 2019, now designated SARS-CoV2, (COVID-19); and WHEREAS, on March 18, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued an order closing all bars, limiting restaurants to only take-out, drive-through, or delivery services and amended the declaration to limit gatherings to less than ten (10) people in the best interest of the public health, safety and welfare to protect life in College Station in response to COVID-19; and WHEREAS, on March 23, 2020, the College Station City Council adopted an Extension of Disaster Ordinance with Ordinance No. 2020-4164 extending the March 17, 2020, Disaster Declaration and extending the Mayor’s Order of March 18, 2020; and WHEREAS, on March 23, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a Second Mayoral Order mandating the citizens of College Station to shelter in place until Tuesday, April 7, 2020; and WHEREAS, on March 30, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance No. 2020-4166 to the Second Mayoral Order of March 23, 2020, mandating the citizens of College Station to shelter in place until Tuesday, April 7, 2020; and WHEREAS, on April 21, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, the order and amended disaster declaration proclaimed by the Mayor on March 18, 2020, both consented to and extended by the City Council on March 23, 2020, in Ordinance No. 2020-4164; and WHEREAS, on April 23, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020- 4169 to the Mayor’s April 21, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on May 22, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, and April 21, 2020; and WHEREAS, on May 28, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020- 4181 to the Mayor’s May 22, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on June 22, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, and May 22, 2020; and Page 305 of 310 Disaster Declaration Renewal Page 2 of 6 COVID-19 WHEREAS, on June 25, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020- 4195 to the June 22, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on June 25, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a Third Mayoral Order mandating commercial entities to require face coverings from: 6:00 A.M., Monday, June 29, 2020, and ending at 11:59 P.M., Friday, July 10, 2020; and WHEREAS, on July 9, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance No. 2020-4197 to the Third Mayoral Order of June 25, 2020, mandating commercial entities to require face coverings; and WHEREAS, on July 22, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, and June 22, 2020; and WHEREAS, on July 23, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020- 4203 to the July 22, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on August 13, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a Fourth Mayoral Order delegating authority to the Texas A&M University President to approve gatherings over 10 people on state lands and facilities it owns or controls; and WHEREAS, on August 21, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020; and July 22, 2020, and WHEREAS, on August 27, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020-4209 to the August 21, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on September 21, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020; July 22, 2020, and August 21, 2020, and WHEREAS, on September 24, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020-4211 to the September 21, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on October 20, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, and September 21, 2020, and WHEREAS, on October 22, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020-4220 to the October 20, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and Page 306 of 310 Disaster Declaration Renewal Page 3 of 6 COVID-19 WHEREAS, on November 20, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, and October 20, 2020, and WHEREAS, on November 23, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020-4226 to the November 20, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on December 7, 2020, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020; July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, and October 20, 2020, and November 20, 2020, and WHEREAS, on December 10, 2020, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2020-4231 to the December 7, 2020, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on January 8, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, and October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020, and December 7, 2020, and WHEREAS, on January 14, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021-4239 to the January 8, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on February 8, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, and October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020, December 7, 2020, and January 8, 2021, and WHEREAS, on February 11, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021-4240 to the February 8, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on March 8, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, and October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020, December 7, 2020, January 8, 2021, and February 8, 2021, and WHEREAS, on March 11, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021-4246 to the March 8, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on April 6, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, Page 307 of 310 Disaster Declaration Renewal Page 4 of 6 COVID-19 September 21, 2020, and October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020, December 7, 2020, January 8, 2021, February 8, 2021, and March 8, 2021; and WHEREAS, on April 8, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021- 4258 to the April 6, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on May 7, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, and October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020, December 7, 2020, January 8, 2021, February 8, 2021, and March 8, 2021, April 6, 2021; and WHEREAS, on May 13, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021- 4263 to the April 6, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on June 7, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, and October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020, December 7, 2020, January 8, 2021, February 8, 2021, March 8, 2021, April 6, 2021, and May 7, 2021; and WHEREAS, on June 10, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021- 4271 to the April 6, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on July 2, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020, December 7, 2020, January 8, 2021, February 8, 2021, March 8, 2021, April 6, 2021, May 7, 2021, and June 7, 2021; and WHEREAS, on July 8, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021- 4275 to the June 7, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on August 6, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020, December 7, 2020, January 8, 2021, February 8, 2021, March 8, 2021, April 6, 2021, May 7, 2021, June 7, 2021, and July 2, 2021; and WHEREAS, on August 12, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021-4288 to the August 6, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, on September 6, 2021, the Mayor of College Station issued a proclamation pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code renewing the state of disaster proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020, December 7, 2020, J anuary 8, 2021, Page 308 of 310 Disaster Declaration Renewal Page 5 of 6 COVID-19 February 8, 2021, March 8, 2021, April 6, 2021, May 7, 2021, June 7, 2021; July 2, 2021, And August 6, 2021; and WHEREAS, on September 9, 2021, the College Station City Council consented with Ordinance 2021-4299 to the September 6, 2021, Disaster Declaration Renewal; and WHEREAS, said state of disaster requires that certain emergency measures be taken pursuant to the Texas Government Code, Chapter 418; and the following regulations shall take effect immediately upon issuance, and shall remain in effect until the state of disaster is terminated or as stated below; and WHEREAS, the conditions necessitating declaration of a state of disaster and mayoral orders continue to exist; and WHEREAS, said state of disaster requires that certain emergency measures be taken pursuant to the Texas Government Code, Chapter 418; and the following regulations shall take effect immediately upon issuance, and shall remain in effect until the state of disaster is terminated or as stated below; and NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT PROCLAIMED BY THE MAYOR OF THE CITY OF COLLEGE STATION: 1. Pursuant to §418.014 of the Texas Government Code the state of disaster is hereby renewed as proclaimed by the Mayor on March 17, 2020, April 21, 2020, May 22, 2020, June 22, 2020, July 22, 2020, August 21, 2020, September 21, 2020, October 20, 2020, November 20, 2020 December 7, 2020, January 8, 2021, February 8, 2021, March 8, 2021, April 6, 2021, May 7, 2021, June 7, 2021, July 2, 2021, August 6, 2021, and September 6, 2021 are renewed, until terminated by the College Station City Council. 2. Pursuant to §418.108(b) of the Texas Government Code, the state of disaster shall continue for a period of not more than seven days from the date of this declaration, unless continued or renewed by the City Council of College Station. 3. Pursuant to §418.108(c) of the Texas Government Code, this declaration of a local state of disaster shall be given prompt and general publicity and shall be filed promptly with the City Secretary. 4. That this proclamation shall take effect on October 7, 2021. Page 309 of 310 Disaster Declaration Renewal Page 6 of 6 COVID-19 DECLARED this 7th day of October, 2021. APPROVED: ATTEST: ___________________ ___________________ Mayor City Secretary APPROVED: ___________________ City Attorney Page 310 of 310